(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Advanced Microdevices Manuals | Linear Circuits Manuals | Supertex Manuals | Sundry Manuals | Echelon Manuals | RCA Manuals | National Semiconductor Manuals | Hewlett Packard Manuals | Signetics Manuals | Fluke Manuals | Datel Manuals | Intersil Manuals | Zilog Manuals | Maxim Manuals | Dallas Semiconductor Manuals | Temperature Manuals | SGS Manuals | Quantum Electronics Manuals | STDBus Manuals | Texas Instruments Manuals | IBM Microsoft Manuals | Grammar Analysis | Harris Manuals | Arrow Manuals | Monolithic Memories Manuals | Intel Manuals | Fault Tolerance Manuals | Johns Hopkins University Commencement | PHOIBLE Online | International Rectifier Manuals | Rectifiers scrs Triacs Manuals | Standard Microsystems Manuals | Additional Collections | Control PID Fuzzy Logic Manuals | Densitron Manuals | Philips Manuals | The Andhra Pradesh Legislative Assembly Debates | Linear Technologies Manuals | Cermetek Manuals | Miscellaneous Manuals | Hitachi Manuals | The Video Box | Communication Manuals | Scenix Manuals | Motorola Manuals | Agilent Manuals
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A tuberculosis directory : containing a list of institutions, associations, and other agencies dealing with tuberculosis in the United States and Canada"

HX641 66627 
RC31 3. A2 N21 1 91 1 A tuberculosis direc 



RECAP 










"^e.'^v^.Xx- 



Columt3ia ©nibergitPcX. 
in t\)e Citp of i^eto |9orfe x 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 
AND SURGEONS 




Reference Library 

Given by 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
THE LIBRARIES 



HEALTH SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 



%A^^*^^0^ c^ 



, . -.\. 



A 

TUBERCULOSIS 

DIRECTORY 



CONTAINING 

A LIST OF INSTITUTIONS, ASSOCI- 
ATIONS AND OTHER AGENCIES 
DEALING WITH TUBERCULOSIS IN 
THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



COMPILED FOR 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR 

THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 

TUBERCULOSIS 

BY 

PHILIP P. JACOBS, Ph.D. 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 



NEW YORK 

105 EAST TWENTY-SECOND STREET 

1911 



Copyright, 191 i, by 

The National Association for the Study and Prevention of 

Tuberculosis 



PRESS OF 

WM. F. FELL COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA 



Table of Contents 

PACE 

Introduction 5 

Sanatoria, Hospitals, and Day Camps for the Treatment of Tuberculosis 

in the United States 9 

Hospitals for the Insane Making Special Provision for Their Tuberculous 

Patients in the United States 69 

Penal Institutions Making Special Provision for Their Tuberculous Pa- 
tients in the United States Si 

Dispensaries, Clinics, and Classes for the Special Treatment of Tubercu- 
losis in the United States 89 

Open Air Schools and Classes for Children in the United States 129 

Associations and Committees for the Study and Prevention of Tubercu- 
losis in the United States 139 

Typical Forms of Organization of Associations in the United States 197 

Legislation Affecting Tuberculosis in the United States 215 

Typical Laws and Ordinances 257 

Supplementary Directory of Anti-Tuberculosis Institutions and Organiza- 
tions in Canada 2S1 

Appendix, Containing Statistical Tables 297 

Index 303 

Advertisements 333 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Open Knowledge Commons 



http://www.archive.org/details/tuberculosisdireOOjaco 



Introduction 

The rapid increase in the number of anti-tuberculosis agencies in the United 
States since the appearance of the last issue of the Directory in 1908 has made 
a revision of that volume imperative. The same general plan and classifica- 
tion have been adopted in the present edition as in its predecessor. The attempt 
has been made to exclude all private institutions of undesirable character, but 
inclusion is not to be understood as a recommendation or endorsement. Other- 
wise no effort has been spared in making the Directory as complete as possible. 

Certain changes in matter and in arrangement have been found necessary 
in the present edition of the book. The number of agencies now in the field 
has forced the exclusion of practically all descriptive material. This is un- 
fortunate from certain points of view, but it has been unavoidable. Any other 
plan would have called for an expansion of the volume beyond the limits of 
practicability. It is hoped, however, that in its present form the Directory 
will still meet all the essential requirements of a book of authoritative reference. 

In arrangement, the most notable change has been the grouping of the 
anti-tuberculosis agencies of Canada in an independent section. While the 
relation of the National Association to the Canadian field is naturally less 
intimate than to that of the United States it is believed that the Canadian 
section is approximately complete and will be found of service in both countries. 

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the cordial co-operation which has been 
met on every side in procuring the information here recorded. 

A study of the extraordinary development of the national equipment 
against tuberculosis as described in the following pages, while revealing the 
familiar general lines of earlier operation, will also demonstrate the increasing 
definition of method which is characterizing the campaign. 

The educational movement, which has been notably effective, has been 
grounded in the voluntary associations for the prevention of tuberculosis which 
have been organized during the last six years in all parts of the United States. 
When the Sixth International Congress on Tuberculosis, which met in Wash- 
ington in 1908, afforded a favorable opportunity for a survey of conditions it 
was found that 195 associations were in existence. At this writing there are 
over 500 such societies representing all parts of the country and charged with 

5 



INTRODUCTION 

the responsibility of dealing with the problem in their respective states and 
communities. 

The acknowledged function of these associations has been not only the 
education of their communities with regard to the causes, methods of preven- 
tion and cure of tuberculosis, but also the creation of a body of opinion which 
should demand the acceptance of responsibihty by pubhc officials and should 
support subsequent official action directed toward the suppression of the 
disease. It is to this latter end that the organized educational energy has been 
especially directed during the three years just past and with results which are 
strikingly shown in the sections dealing with institutional establishment and 
legislation. It is justly to be regarded as perhaps the most encouraging sign 
of progress that with each succeeding year less and less pressure is needed to 
obtain the recognition of responsibility on the part of the public authorities. 

It was inevitable that this appreciation of responsibility should offer new 
problems of difficulty and these are now under active discussion. It is fairly 
generally agreed that the tuberculosis situation is one which cannot adequately 
be dealt with on a federal basis. The question of what political unit shall be 
regarded as best adapted to handle the problem is not entirely clear. There 
is a growing feeling that the State sanatorium, which signalized the first accept- 
ance of responsibility in many commonwealths, fails to secure results of marked 
consequence. There would seem to be a growing opinion that in large cities 
municipal provision is logical and wise. There remains, however, the greater 
part of the population resident in small towns and rural districts. To reach 
such communities it is obvious that another unit must be selected and the 
coimty becomes the probable choice. While the efficiency of the county as the 
responsible agency has not yet been sufficiently tested there are indications 
that it will in the immediate future represent the most important political 
factor in our problem except where the largest cities are concerned. 

It is probable that in certain sections, by reason of peculiar conditions both 
historical and psychological, the State may play the leading role. A uniform 
system seems to be impracticable and not necessarily advisable. It is also 
probable that a compromise in method may be reached by which responsibility 
shall be distributed between the state, county and municipality or other local 
unit as the case may be. 

It has been suggested that such distribution might assign to the state 
the care of incipient cases and to the local authorities the provision for patients 
in advanced stages. With the tendency, now evident, to break down the lines 
between the different stages of the disease so far as institutional treatment is 
concerned it is doubtful if such distribution would stand the test of experience. 

The problem is presenting itself with increasing insistence in connection 

6 



INTRODUCTION 

with the rapidly growing movement for the establishment of hospitals for ad- 
vanced cases. It was evident three years ago that the movement for the estab- 
lishment of sanatoria for curable cases would proceed by its own momentum. 
There was also evident a fairly satisfactory growth in the number of dis- 
pensaries, always recognized as a fundamental factor in the equipment. There 
was, however, at that time a striking lack of provision for advanced cases, 
also recognized as an essential point in the national defense. 

Stimulated by the concentration of opinion on this point exhibited at the 
Washington Congress, the effort to obtain such hospitals was taken up with 
energy. It was in the prosecution of this effort that the importance of the 
county came to be recognized and the difficulties mentioned above were 
especially met. While it is too soon to forecast with confidence the ultimate 
outcome of the discussion it is certain that another triennial period will 
witness a much closer approach to unanimity of opinion. 

Viewing the situation broadly the growth of the institutional equipment 
is highly encouraging. The last issue of the Directory hsted 240 special insti- 
tutions for the care of tuberculous patients. The present volume records 422 
such foundations with an increase in bed capacity from 14,000 to 26,360. 

When it is remembered that these public foundations usually require 
preliminary legislative enabling acts together with the necessarily slow pro- 
cedure of appropriation and erection the growth is striking. 

Aside from the more general recognition of the importance of the advanced 
case, perhaps the most saHent feature in the recent development of the campaign 
is the emphasis upon the relation of the child to the tuberculosis problem. 
Various studies have appeared which show in a startling way the previously 
unsuspected prevalence of the disease in those of school age. As a consequence 
there is manifest on every side a desire to carry the teaching of personal and 
pubHc hygiene into the schools and to afford provision for the care of predis- 
posed or already tuberculous children in special classes or outdoor schools. 
This movement, now in its infancy, will doubtless require in the next issue of 
the Directory a much more voluminous section for its description. 

With the movement for hospitals, sanatoria, dispensaries and schools well 
organized and making satisfactory progress it is probable that the next phase 
to attract concentrated attention will be the development of plans for the care 
of consumptives in their homes under efficient supervision and management. 
Granted that it were desirable that all tuberculous patients should be segregated 
in institutions it is clear that such a condition is immediately, if not permanently, 
impracticable. Without relaxing the effort to secure as near an approach as 
may be to such ideal conditions, there remains the present necessity of dealing 
with the very large niunber of cases which for one reason or another remain 

7 



INTRODUCTION 

in their homes. Just how this problem will be met in its details it is impossible 
to say, but the success which is attending the wise coordination of dispensary 
work and visiting nursing in some of our larger cities indicates that an exten- 
sion and adaptation of these methods to smaller towns and even rural com- 
munities will be a possible course. 

It is obviously too early to expect a definite drop in the mortality curve 
as a result of the specific campaign against tuberculosis in the United States. 
Viewed from the national point of view, the movement is hardly six years old 
and the provisions which could produce observable results in vital statistics 
are naturally of still briefer standing. There are, however, in certain quarters 
indications which offer distinct encouragement, and perhaps it is within the 
limits of conservative judgment to look for a specific result within the next 
five years and for a reduction of marked dimensions within a decade. 

Livingston Farrand 

New York, April i, 191 1 Executive Secretary 



Sanatoria, Hospitals, and Day Camps 

for the 

Treatment of Tuberculosis in the 
United States 



Sanatoria, Hospitals, and Day Camps 

for the 
Treatment of Tuberculosis in the United States 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

The expansion in the scope of institutional treatment of tuberculosis makes 
this section more than a catalog of sanatoria. The day camp, the night camp, 
the temporary hospital, open only part of the year, the general hospital and 
almshouse, making special provision for tuberculosis — these are all included 
in this section. Each variety of work is, however, plainly indicated. The 
dates in parentheses after the names of the sanatoria indicate, as a rule, the 
date when the institution was opened. Unless otherwise stated, the institu- 
tion may be considered as solely for the treatment of tuberculosis. 

The institutions are arranged alphabetically according to location under 
their separate States, the only exception being that the State Sanatoria are 
listed first in all cases. 

Hospitals for the insane and penal institutions making special provision 
for tuberculosis and open-air schools are treated in separate sections. 

Canadian sanatoria and hospitals are listed in the last section, which con- 
tains all of the Canadian anti-tuberculosis agencies. 



ALABAMA 

STATE SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) 

The State Legislature in 1907 appropriated $40,000 for a state sanatorium, to be made 
available at the discretion of the Governor. In 191 1, a commission began to inspect sites 
with view to immediate building. 



BIRMINGHAM • 

TUBERCULOSIS CAMP OF THE JEFFERSON COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCU- 
LOSIS ASSOCIATION (August i, 1910): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — $20.00 per 



SANATORIA ALASKA, ARIZONA 

month, wlicii aljle to paj^; no charges when indigent. Secretary: — William M. McGrath. 
Visiting Physicians:— Dr. Cabot Lull and Dr. H. S. Ward. Application should be made 
to the Secretary. 



ALASKA 

HAINES 

THE PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL (December 12, 1907): 

A general hospital making provision for all classes of cases. Capacity: — 10. Rates; 
There are no charges. Superintendent: — Rev. A. F. McLean. Resident Physician: 
Dr. C. W. Presnall. 



ARIZONA 

PHOENIX 

EAST FARM SANATORIUM, PHOENIX INDIAN SCHOOL (1909): 
For tuberculous Indians. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Superinten- 
dent: — Charles W. Goodman. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — 
Dr. E. A. Marden. Note :— Conducted by the Office of Indian Affairs. 

THE HANWOOD HOME, R. F. D. No. i (February i, 1911): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates:— $12.00 per week. Medical Director: 
— Dr. H. A. Hughes. Superintendent: — Steward Warren Hanwood. 

MARICOPA HOSPITAL, under direction of Associated Charities (February i, 1909): 

For advanced cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — Free for patients while undergoing 

investigation. Superintendent: — Miss C. G. Gilchrist, Room 12, City Hall. Medical 

Director: — Dr. H. A. Hughes. Application should be made to the Associated Charities. 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL (1893): 

A general hospital admitting all classes of cases. Capacity: — 35. Rates: — $16.00 to 
$20.00 per week. Application should be made to the Sister Superior. 

ST. LUKE'S HOME (December 27, 1907): 

Preferably for incipient cases, but others are admitted. Capacity: — 35. Rates: — 
$12.00 to $18.00 per week for those who are able to pay; others pay according to their 
ability. President:— Rt. Rev. J. W. Atwood. Superintendent:— Rev. B. R. Cocks, P. O. 
Box 278. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

PRESCOTT 

PAMSETGAAF, AMONG THE PINES (May i, 1903): 

For cases of pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis which offer a reasonable prospect of 
arrest or cure. Capacity: — 18. Rates: — $25.00 to $40.00 per week, for board, medical 
attendance and medicines. Superintendent:— Dr. John W. Fhnn. Consulting Physi- 
cian : — Major Charles N. Barney, Medical Corps, U. S. Army. Application should be 
made to the Superintendent. 

TUCSON 

ARIZONA HEALTH LEAGUE OPEN AIR CAMP (December 15, 1909): 
For any person not constantly confined to bed, who is deserving and without means. 
Capacity: — 8. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Mrs. G. W. Pittock. 



SANATORIA ARKANSAS, CALIFORNIA 

Application should be made to the Superintendent. Only those who have been residents 
of Pima County for a year or longer are admitted. 

ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL (December, 1900): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 30. Rates: — $15.00 
per week. Application should be made to the Sister Superior. 

WHITERIVER 

FORT APACHE TUBERCULAR CAMP (1910) : 

For tuberculous Indians. Capacity for tuberculous patients:— 10. Superinten- 
dent: — C. W. Grouse. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. Hubert 
V. Hailman. Note : — Conducted by the Ofiice of Indian Affairs. 



ARKANSAS 

BOONEVILLE 

ARKANSAS TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (State Sanatorium) (August, 1910) : 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 74. Rates: — $10.00 per 
week. Superintendent:— Dr. J. S. Shibley. Application should be made to the Superin- 
tendent. 



CALIFORNIA 



ALTA 

WHITE CRUSADERS' SANATORIUM (August i, 1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 35. Rates: — $60.00 to 
$100.00 per month. Superintendent and Medical Director: — Dr. Burt F. Howard. 
Application should be made to "The White Crusaders," P. O. Box 185, Sacramento, Cal. 

BANNING 

DOCTOR KING'S SANATORIUM (October 15. 1909) : 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 15. Rates: — 
$15.00 per week. Medical Director: — Dr. John C. King. Application should be made to 
the Medical Director. 

BELMONT (San Mateo County) 

CALIFORNIA SANATORIUM FOR THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS 

Qune 15, 1910): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $30.00 per 
week and upwards. Medical Director: — Dr. Max Rothschild, 350 Post Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Resident Physician: — Dr. Agnes Walker. Application should be made to the 
Medical Director. 

COLFAX 

COLFAX SCHOOL FOR THE TUBERCULOUS (December, 1908): 
For all cases offering hope of arrest. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $75.00 to $100.00 per 
month. Superintendent: — Dr. Robert A. Peers. Manager: — J. E. Tade, looi K Street, 
Sacramento. Application should be made either to the Superintendent or the Manager. 

13 



SANATORIA CALIFORNIA 

FAIRFAX 

AREQUIPA SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) : / 

The Telegraph Hill Neighborhood Association of San Francisco will erect a Sanatorium 
in 191 1 for 20 patients at Fairfax, Marin County. The Medical^Director will be Dr. Philip 
King Brown, 350 Post Street, San Francisco. 

LOS ANGELES 

THE BARLOW SANATORIUM (incorporated September, 1902): 
For patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who have been residents of Los Angeles County 
for at least one year, who are without means to go elsewhere, and who are capable of cure or 
marked improvement. Capacity: — 44. Rates: — $5.00 per week for those who are able 
to pay and for societies and associations who wish to keep patients in the sanatorium. This 
price includes everything, including laundry, medicine, etc. Several are cared for free of 
charge. Medical Director: — Dr. W. Jarvis Barlow. Resident Physician:— Dr. R. L. 
Cunningham. Application should be made at the sanatorium, or 616 Security Building, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

HIGHLAND PARK SANATORIUM (November 14, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $15.00 to 
S30.00 per week. Medical Director: — Dr. Neil Trew. General Superintendent: — 
Miss Maude Summers, 5605 Hub Street. Application should be made to the Medical 
Director. 

KASPARE COHN HOSPITAL AND TRAINING SCHOOL, Stephenson Avenue 

(August, 1910): 
A general hospital admitting all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients : 
— 10. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. Henry H. Lissner, 611 
Lissner Building. 

LOS ANGELES CITY AND COUNTY HOSPITAL (1S88): 

A general hospital admitting advanced cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 
1 20. Rates : — There are no charges. Superintendent : — Dr. Charles H. Whitman. Resi- 
dent Physician: — Dr. J. M. Dunsmoore. Application should be made to county officials 
or at the office of the Associated Charities. 

MONROVLA 

POTTENGER SANATORIUM FOR DISEASES OF THE LUNGS AND THROAT 

(December, 1903): 
For all patients that offer an opportunity of cure or of making material improvement. 
Capacity: — 100. Rates: — $32.50 to $52.50 per week. Superintendent: — Dr. F. M. 
Pottenger. Assistant Superintendent: — Dr. J. E. Pottenger. Application should be 
made to the Superintendent. (See advertisement, p. v.) 

NEEDLES 

NEEDLES COTTAGE SANATORIUM (December 24, 1908): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 24. Rates: — $40.00 per 

week; $150.00 per month. Medical Director: — Dr. Charles A. Shepard. Application 

should be made to the Medical Director. 

OAKLAND 

KING'S DAUGHTERS HOME FOR INCURABLES (July i, 1897): 

Receives advanced cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 12. Rates: — $35.00 

per month. Resident Physician: — Dr. A. S. Kelly. President: — Mrs. Matilda Brown. 

Application should be made at the Home. 

PASADENA 

LA VINA SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (August 22, 1909): 

For patients in moderate circumstances or indigent who are residents of Pasadena and 

14 



SANATORIA CALIFORNIA 

vicinity. Capacity: — 35. Rates: — Maximum charge, $7.00 per week; patients pay what 
they can afiford. Medical Director: — Dr. Henry B. Stehman, 70 South Grand Avenue. 
Resident Physician: — Dr. Caroline McQuiston. Application should be made to the 
Medical Director. 

MARTYN SANATORIUM (1909): 

For women in early stages only. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — $30.00 per week. Super- 
intendent: — Miss G. Graham. Resident Physician: — Dr. George Martyn. Application 
should be made to the Resident Physician, 825 Security Building, Los Angeles. 

REDLANDS 

THEMENTONE SANATORIUM (Formerly THE SETTLEMENT) (1901): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $15.00 to $35.00 per week; has a 
charity fund for the care of needy consumptives who have an established residence in 
Redlands. Medical Director: — Dr. Gayle G. Moseley. Application should be made to 
the Medical Director. 

RIVERSIDE 

BOX SPRING SANATORIUM (not yet in operation).— In December, 1910, an 
association of the leading citizens of Riverside was formed for the purpose of erecting a sana- 
torium at Box Spring, near the city, for the treatment of indigent consumptives resident 
in Riverside and vicinity. The institution will probably accommodate about 30 patients 
and will be erected in 191 1. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

CITY AND COUNTY HOSPITAL: 

Special buildings for all classes of indigent consumptives who are residents of San 
Francisco. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 150. Superintendent and Resident 
Physician: — Dr. William R. Dorr. Application should be made at the Central Emergency 
Hospital. 

THE DIGGINS SANATORIUM (August, 1909): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 6. Rates: — $25.00 per week exclusive of medical 
fees. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Edward A. Diggins, 277 Devisadero Street. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Superintendent. 

SAN JOSE 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY HOSPITAL (June i, 1911) (not yet in operation): 
Receives all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 26. Rates : — 
There are no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. J. Clark. 

SAN LEANDRO 

ALAMEDA COUNTY INFIRMARY (1903): 

Receives all classes of cases. Capacity: — 72. Rates: — There are no charges. Super- 
intendent: — Dr. W. A. Clark. Physician in charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. 
Edward von Adelung. Application should be made to the County Supervisors. 

SIERRE MADRE 

EL REPOSO SANATORIUM (January 14, 1909): 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — 
$15.00 to $35.00 per week. Superintendent and Manager : — Mrs. H. H. Lund. Resident 
Physician: — Dr. George S. Wells. Application should be made to the Manager. 

SOLDIERS' HOME 

PACIFIC BRANCH NATIONAL HOME FOR DISABLED VOLUNTEER SOL- 
DIERS (1890): 
For all tuberculous soldiers who have served in any war of the United States, and who 

IS 



SANATORIA CANADA, COLORADO 

have received an honorable discharge. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Rates: 
— There are no charges. Major and Surgeon: — Dr. O. C. ISlcNavy. 

STOCKTON 

RED CROSS TUBERCULOSIS CAMP OF SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY (July 10, 

1909): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 14. Rates: — $25.00 per 
month. Superintendent: — Miss N. E. Wells. Medical Director: — Dr. M. Goodman. 
Application should be made to the Medical Director. 



CANADA 

[See Supplementary Directory of Anti-tuberculosis Institutions and Organizations in 

Canada, page 281.] 



COLORADO 

ANTONITO 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CAMP SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) (June i, 191 1): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $50.00 per month. Medical 
Director :— Dr. John Carling. Application should be made to the Medical Director. Note : 
— This sanatorium will be open only during the months from June i to October i. 

BRUSH 

EBEN-EZER MERCY INSTITUTE (1904): 

For incipient cases, but others are received. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $7.00 to $12.00 
per week. Some free beds are maintained although none is endowed. Entrance examination, 
$5.00. Superintendent: — Rev. J. Madsen. Application should be made to the Superin- 
tendent. 

COLORADO SPRINGS 

COLORADO SPRINGS SANATORIUIM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 
The Associated Charities of Colorado Springs have selected a site for a sanatorium to 
accommodate 20 patients and have raised $20,000 for the erection of the sanatorium. 

CRAGMOR SANATORIUM (June i, 1907): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $25.00 per week. Physician-in- 
Chief : — Dr. Alexius M. Forster. Consulting Physicians: — Dr. Gerald B. Webb and Dr. 
William Whitridge Williams. Application should be made to the Physician-in-Chief. 
(See advertisement, p. v.) 

GLOCKNER SANATORIUM (began treatment of tuberculosis in 1880): 
A general sanatorium, but special provision is made for tuberculous patients in any 
stage of the disease. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 175. Rates: — $10.00 to $35.00 
per week. Superintendent: — Sister Rose Alexius. Application should be made to the 

Superintendent. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA SANATORIUM (January t, 1909): 
I'or members of the Modern Woodmen of America in incipient and moderately advanced 
stages of tuberculosis. Capacity: — 180 at present; to be enlarged to 500 capacity. Rates: 

16 



SANATORIA COLORADO 

— Free to beneficiary members of Modern Woodmen of America; no others admitted. 
Medical Superintendent : — Dr. John E. White. 

THE NORDRACH RANCH SANATORIUM (1901) : 

For all classes of consumptives except the far advanced. Capacity :— -60. Rates: — 
$75.00 per month, which includes everything except personal laundry. Medical Director :— 
Dr. John E. White. Resident Physician :— Dr. George Rea. Application should be made 
to the Medical Director. 

STAR RANCH, IN THE PINES (April i, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — $3.00 per 
day; $15.00 to $20.00 per week; $60.00 to $80.00 per month, depending on size and location 
of room or cabin. Manager: — Maurice G. Witkind. Application should be made to the 
Manager. 

UNION PRINTERS' HOME (1898): 

Receives all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 70. Rates : — 
There are no charges. Superintendent: — Charles W. Deacon. Visiting Physician: 
— Dr. D. I. Christopher. Application: — Any member in good standing of a subordinate 
union of the International Typographical Union, who has been such for five continuous 
years, may apply for admission. His application must be made upon the form provided 
by the trustees, be indorsed by the union with which he is affiliated, and must set forth, by a 
physician's certificate, his physical condition at date of application. 

DENVER 

THE AGNES MEMORIAL SANATORIUM (September, 1904) : 

Exclusively for early cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. When accommodations are 
limited, preference will be given to candidates from western Pennsylvania. Capacity: — 150. 
Rates:— $9.00 to $12.00 per week, which includes medical attendance and ordinary nursing. 
Superintendent: — Dr. G. Walter Holden. Application should be made to the Superin- 
tendent, Montclair Station, Denver, Colo. 

THE ASSOCIATION HEALTH FARM (May, 1903) (not in operation): 

Especially for early cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, but also for others in need of outdoor 
life. For young men of limited means who have a good prospect of recovery. Capacity : — 
50. Rates: — $28.00 per month if able to live in tents; $32.00 in pavilion. The Young 
Men's Christian Association Health Farm was temporarily closed on May i, 1910, and will 
probably not be re-opened until January i, 19 12. 

THE HOME, an Episcopal Church Home (September, 1894) : 

The only requirements for admission are that a person is worthy of a Christian home, 
has a good chance of being benefited by the climate, and presents a letter from some clergy- 
man or from some one the superintendent knows. Capacity: — -150. Rates: — From $25.00 
a month to $25.00 a week according to service. Superintendent : — Rev. Frederick W. Oakes. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

MRS. LARE'S TENT SANATORIUM (1901): 

For consumptives in any stage of the disease. Capacity: — 33. Rates: — $1.00 per day 
and up according to nursing and care required. Superintendent: — Mrs. M. W. Lare. 
Application shoidd be made to Mrs. M. W. Lare, 4633 Bert Street, Denver. 

THE NATIONAL JEWISH HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES (1899): 
For indigent consumptives in whose cases the prognosis is fair or good. Capacity : — 135. 
Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent and Medical Director: — Dr. Moses 
ColHns. Secretary : — Mr. Alfred Muller. Application for admission can be made through 
directors of the Jewish Charities in all of the larger cities of the country. Each application 
must be accompanied by a guarantee that the patient shall not become a charge upon the 
community of Denver after he leaves the Hospital, and that his return transportation will be 
given in case of need. 

2 17 



SANATORIA COLORADO, CONNECTICUT 

SANATORIUM OF THE JEWISH CONSUMPTIVES' RELIEF SOCIETY (June, 
1904): 

For destitute consumptives in any stage of the disease. Capacity: — no. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Herman Schwatt. Secretary: — 
Dr. C. D. Spivak, 337 Jackson Building, Denver. Application should be made to the Secre- 
tary. 

THE SUNLIGHT SANATORIUM, 2727 W. 33d Avenue (1905): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates:— $10.00 to $25.00 per week. Super- 
intendent: — Dr. M. W. Page. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

THE SWEDISH NATIONAL SANATORIUM (July, 1906. Consolidated in 1909 
with the Swedish Consumptive Sanatorium): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $6.00 per week; 25 per cent, of the 
patients are treated free, although there are no endowed beds. Superintendent: — Rev. W. 
F. Leufsledt. Medical Director: — Dr. John Lindahl. Application should be made to 
the Medical Director. 

EDGEWATER 

THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SANATORIUM (1905): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 38. Rates: — $10.00 per week; $35.00 to $50.00 
per month, including medical care and medicines. Some free beds are maintained, the num- 
ber being lixed by the board of directors. Superintendent: — John Schlerf. Medical 
Director: — Dr. W. N. Beggs. Financial Secretary: — Mr. Will M. Walther. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Superintendent, R. F. D., Edgewater, Colo. 

FERN HILL SANATORIUM, Cor. W. 26th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard (1903): 
For incipient and advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $10.00 to $35.00 per 

week. Superintendent: — Mrs. Anna H. Ralston. Resident Physician: — Dr. C. P. 

Conroy. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

LA JUNTA 

MENNONITE SANATORIUM (October 28, 1908): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $30.00 per 
month. Superintendent: — J. M. Hershey. Medical Director: — Dr. W. M. Moore. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

LAS ANIMAS 

UNITED STATES NAVAL HOSPITAL (May 4, 1907): 

For consumptives in all stages of the disease who are connected with the United States 
Navy and are recommended by the Surgeon-General of the Navy. Capacity: — 254. Medi- 
cal Inspector: — -Dr. Philip Leach, U. S. N. Application for admission should be made 
through the medical officers of the navy. Only officers and enlisted men of the U. S. Navy 
and Marine Corps are eligible for admission. 



CONNECTICUT 



HARTFORD 

HARTFORD COUNTY STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (Oct. 3,1910): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 114. Rates: — There are no charges for indigent 

cases; other patients from $4.00 to $10.00 per week. Superintendent: — Dr. C. C. Corson. 

Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

18 



SANATORIA CONNECTICUT 

MERIDEN 

NEW HAVEN COUNTY STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (January i, 
1910): 

For all classes of cases, both medical and surgical. Capacity: — 122. Rates: — There 
are no charges for indigent cases; other patients from $4.00 to $10.00 per week. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. J. B. Dinnan. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

SHELTON 

FAIRFIELD COUNTY STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (August 10, 
1909): 

For all classes of cases, both medical and surgical. Capacity: — 102. Rates: — There 
are no charges for indigent cases; other patients from $4.00 to $10.00 per week. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. W. M. Stockwell. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 



BRIDGEPORT 

LAKE VIEW TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (May 18, 1907): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent: — M. C. Cowles. Application should be made to J. V. Brennan, Superintendent of 
Poor. Applicant must be a resident of Bridgeport. 

CROMWELL 

MIDDLESEX TUBERCULOSIS CAMP (August 22, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity : — 14. Rates : — $1.00 per day. 
Matron: — Annie E. Roxborough. Medical Director: — Dr. James Murphy. Applica- 
tion should be made to the Medical Director. 

FALLS VILLAGE 

DR. SHANNON'S SANITARIUM (November, 1906); 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $25.00 to 
$35.00 per week. Superintendent: — Dr. Thomas I. Shannon. Application should be 
made to the Superintendent. 

GREENWICH 

NATHANIEL WITHERELL MEMORIAL TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION OF 
THE GREENWICH GENERAL HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

Late in 1910, Mrs. Nathaniel Witherell donated to the town of Greenwich a sum of money 
sufficient to erect a tuberculosis pavilion which will be built in 1911. 

HARTFORD 

FORESTERS OF AMERICA TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (not yet in 
operation) : 

The Supreme Court of the Foresters of America authorized the appointment of a com- 
mittee at its annual meeting in 1910 to examine proposed sites for a National Sanatorium 
for Tuberculosis and Other Diseases, to prociure estimates as to cost of building and main- 
tenance and to report at the next meeting, in August, 1911. John F. Cosgrove, 36 Pearl 
Street, Hartford, Supreme Chief Ranger. 

THE PREVENTORIUM OF THE HARTFORD SOCIETY FOR THE PREVEN- 
TION OF TUBERCULOSIS (July, 1909): 

For children with closed tuberculosis. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — 5 cents per day when 
able to pay it. Superintendent :— Dr. Henry F. Stoll, 75 Pratt Street. Application should 
be made to the Superintendent. 

19 



SANATORIA CONNECTICUT, DELAWARE 

WILDWOOD SANATORIUM (iqo:): 

For early and curable cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity :— 50. Rates : — $7.00 
per week. Six private rooms at $10.00 per week are maintained. Resident Physician: — 
Dr. William B. Bartlett. Application should be made to the Resident Physician. 

NEW CANAAN 

DR. BROOKS SANATORIUM (1S96): 

P'or the treatment of the earlier stage cases of pulmonary tuberculosis only. Capacity : — 
28. Rates: — S25.00 per week, including everj'thing. Resident Physician and Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. M. J. Brooks. Application should be made at the sanatorium, Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday afternoons. 

NEW HAVEN 

NEW HAVEN TUBERCULOSIS DAY CAMP OF THE VISITING NURSE ASSO- 
CIATION (May I, 1910): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 25. Rates:— There are no charges. Medical 
Superintendent: — Dr. F. B. Standish, 310 Elm Street. Application should be made to the 
Visiting Nurse Association. 

TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT OF THE NEW HAVEN GENERAL HOSPI- 
TAL (not yet in operation): 

In 19 10 a gift of $600,000 was made to the New Haven General Hospital by an 
anonymous donor, the fund to be devoted to tuberculosis work. Definite plans for the ex- 
penditure of this money had not been worked out on March i, 1911, but a tract of 40 acres 
near New Haven had been purchased, for hospital and camp purposes. 

STAMFORD 

STAMFORD TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (June i, 1910): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — Free to town poor, $1.00 per day 
for others. Superintendent: — T. Miller. Application should be made to the Selectmen 
or the Directors. 

WALLINGFORD 

GAYLORD FARM SANATORIUM (September, 1904): 

Exclusively for persons in the early stages of pulmonary tuberculosis who are of very 
moderate means and residents of the State. Capacity: — 85. Rates: — $7.00 per week. 
Medical Superintendent: — Dr. David R.Lyman. Application should be made to the 
Superintendent. 



DELAWARE 
MARSHALLTON (R. F. D.) 

HOPE FARM (1907. Removed to present location, March, 1910): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity:— 33. Rates:— $8.00 to $12.00 per week. Super- 
intendent: — Miss Rose Geiger. Note: — This sanatorium is operated by the Delaware 
Anti-Tuberculosis Society and is subsidized by the State. It serves the purpose of a State 
sanatorium. Application should be made at any of the State tuberculosis dispensaries. 



SANATORIA DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, FLORIDA, GEORGIA 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



WASHINGTON 

TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 14th and 
Upshur Streets, N. W. (July I, 1908): 

For indigent consumptives in all stages of the disease. Capacity: — 120. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. W. D. Tewksbury. Application should be 
made to the Board of Charities of the District of Columbia. 

WASHINGTON RED CROSS DAY CAMP (1908): 

For ambulatory cases only. Capacity : — 30. Rates : — There are no charges. Super- 
intendent: — Isabell L. Strong. Application should be made to the Association for the 
Prevention of Tuberculosis, 923 H Street, N. W., or to the Superintendent of the Instructive 
Visiting Nurse Society, 2001 I Street, N. W. 

SANATORIUM OF THE BENEVOLENT AND PROTECTIVE ORDER OF 
ELKS (not yet in operation) : 

In 1910 a committee was appointed by the Grand Exalted Ruler of the Elks to consider 
the advisability of erecting a national sanatorium for members of the Order and to report at 
the annual meeting in 1911. Joseph A. Burkart, Washington, D. C, is chairman of this 
committee. 

STARMONT SANATORIUM (see Washington Grove, Md.) 



FLORIDA 



STATE SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) 

The Legislature in 1909 gave to the State Board of Health permission to erect and main- 
tain a State Sanatorium, but owing to a diversion of funds from the State Health appro- 
priations, the sanatorium has not yet been established. 



OKAHUMPKA 

GRANDVIEW SANATORIUM (1887): 

Open from November i to May i. (See Newport, Term., for details.) 



GEORGL^ 



ALTO 

GEORGIA STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (March 15, 1911): 
Capacity: — 70. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. E. W, 
Glidden. 



SANATORIA GEORGIA, HAWAII, IDAHO 

ATLANTA 

BATTLE HILL TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (Municipal Sanatorium) 

(January i, iQii): 
For moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Application should be made to the Health Officer. 

HOME FOR INCURABLES, South Boulevard and Woodward Avenue. (Began 
special treatment of tuberculous patients in 1900): 

For advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity of tuberculosis pavilion : — 14. Rates : 
— There are no charges. Superintendent: — j\lrs. MoUie Rosenberg. Application should 
be made to the Superintendent. 

DR. E. C. THRASH'S SANATORIUM FOR THE TREATMENT OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (August, 1909) :■ 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 22. Rates: — $25.00 per 
week. Superintendent: — Dr. E. C. Thrash. Application should be made to the Superin- 
tendent at City Office, 4th National Bank. Building, Atlanta, Ga. 

AUGUSTA 

RICHMOND COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (May i, 1909): 

For consumptives in all stages. Capacity: — 24. Rates: — There are no charges. 

Medical Director: — Dr. Charles J. Montgomery. Application should be made to the 

Medical Director. 

CAMP YONAH 

CAMP YONAH SANATORIUM (October, 1907): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — S65.00 per 
month. Medical Director: — Dr. W. C. Bryant. Application should be made to the 
Medical Director. 

PINEDALE 

PINE MOUNTAIN TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (April i, 1909): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $2.50 per 
day; $13.50 per week; $60.00 per month and up. Superintendent: — Dr. Jesse Monroe 
Anderson, Pinedale, Talbot Co., Ga. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 



HAWAII 

HONOLULU 

LEAHI HOME, HONOLULU HOME FOR INCURABLES: 

Receives all classes of consumptives. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 36. 
Rates: — $1.50 per day; there are 8 free beds. Superintendent: — Dr. A. N. Sinclair, 
P. O. Bo.x 801. 

IDAHO 

LAPWAI 

FORT LAPWAI SANATORIUM (1910): 

For tuberculous Indians. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 45. Superinten- 
dent: — Theodore Sharp. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. John 
N. Alley. Note : — Conducted by the Office of Indian Affairs. 



SANATORIA ILLINOIS 

ILLINOIS 
CHICAGO 

CHICAGO FRESH AIR HOSPITAL (July i, 1910): 

Primarily for self-supporting patients in all stages. Capacity : — 30. Rates : — $2.00 per 
day; private rooms $3.50 per day. Superintendent and Medical Director : — Dr. Ethan A. 
Gray. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

CHICAGO HOME FOR INCURABLES, 5535 Ellis Avenue (1890): 
Receives advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 60. 
Rates: — Some patients are treated free; others are charged varying amounts according to 
the circumstances of each individual. Medical Director:— Dr. W. P. Goodsmith. Appli- 
cation should be made to H. N. Higinbotham, President, 1200 First National Bank Building. 

COOK COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (September i, 1909): 
For advanced cases only. Capacity:— 324. Rates: — There are no charges. Super- 
intendent: — Miss Catherine McNamara, Harrison and Lincoln Streets. Application 
should be made to the Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL TUBERCULOSIS SANITARIUM OF iCHICAGO (not yet in 
operation) : 

Provided for by [a. 'referendum vote^in 1909, and a direct tax for the first year in 1910. 
Will be erected in 191 1. Probable capacity: — 300. Rates: — For the free treatment of 
citizens of Chicago. Superintendent: — FranJc E. Wing, 157 West Adams Street. 

VALMORA INDUSTRIAL SANATORIUM (see Watrous, N. Mex.) 

CHICAGO (P. O. Oak Forest) 

OPEN AIR PAVILIONS OF COOK COUNTY INFIRMARY (1910): 
For tuberculous patients in the Infirmary only. Capacity : — 1 20. Rates : — There are 
no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. Ernest S. Moore. 

NAPERVILLE 

THE EDWARD SANATORIUM (January 15, 1907): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — $ro.oo per week. There are 16 
supported beds. Medical Director: — Dr. Theodore B. Sachs. Superintendent: — Miss 
Winifred McEdward. Application should be made at the Chicago Tuberculosis Institute, 
157 West Adams Street, Chicago. 

OTTAWA 

OTTAWA TENT COLONY (1904): 

For early cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — S18.00 to $30.00 
per week. Medical Director: — Dr. J. W. Pettit. Superintendent: — H. V. Pettit. 
Application for admission should be made to the Superintendent. 

QUINCY 

ILLINOIS SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' HOME (1911): 

Receives incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity for tuber- 
culous patients: — 15. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — J. M. Elder. 

ROCK ISLAND 

ROCK ISLAND MUNICIPAL SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) : 

Provided for by a referendum vote in April, 1910. In 191 1 about $5845 will be avail- 
able for the sanatorium from a direct tax of one mill. No steps for construction will 

23 



SANATORIA ILLINOIS, INDIANA 

be taken probably until more money is available. The directors of the sanatorium are Dr. 
Joseph De Silva, \V. A. Rosenfield, and Dr. A. N. Mueller. 

WAUKEGAN 

LAKE COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS INSTITUTE COLONY (July 28, 1908): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 25 in winter and 32 in 
summer. Rates: — $1.00 per day to county patients, $10.00 to $12.50 per week and $40.00 
to $50.00 per month for others. Superintendent and Manager: — Dr. W. H. Watterson, 
125 North Genessee St., Waukegan. Application should be made to the Manager. 

WINFIELD 

CHICAGO WINFIELD TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (October, 1908): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 68. Rates: — There are no fixed charges. 
Physician in chief: — Dr. Theodore B. Sachs, 100 State St., Chicago. Resident Physician 
and Superintendent: — Dr. S. B. Hirshberg. Application for admission should be made 
to Mrs. Johanna M. Loeb, 4715 Greenwood Avenue, Chicago, 111. 



INDIANA 



ROCKVILLE 

STATE TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (April i, 1911): 

For incipient pulmonary cases only. Capacity: — 100. Rates: — There are no charges 
for indigent cases; others are charged $9.00 per week. Superintendent : — Dr. H. B. Leavitt. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 



DANVILLE 

ROCKWOOD TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (October, 1907): 

Chiefly for early cases, though special arrangements are made for advanced cases. 

Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $15.00, $20.00, and $25.00 per week. Arrangements are being 

made for some free beds. Medical Director: — Dr. Thomas J. Beasley. Application 

should be made to the Medical Director. 

EVANSVILLE 

BOEHNE FARM (December i, 1910): 

For incipient and advanced cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — There are no charges. 
Superintendent:— Dr. James Y. Welborn. Application should be made at the tuberculosis 
clinic, Evansville. Note: — Conducted by the Evansville and Vanderburgh County Anti- 
Tuberculosis Association. 

FORT ^AYNE 

ST. ROCHUS HOSPITAL: 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 10. Rates: — There are no charges. Applica- 
tion should be made to the Sister Superior. 

FRANKFORT 

FRANKFORT TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (August, 1910): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $15.00 per week; $60 per month. 

Superintendent:— Dr. Charles Chittick. Vice-President and Medical Director:— Dr. 

Albert H. Coble. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

24 



SANATORIA INDIANA, IOWA 

INDIANAPOLIS 

FLOWER MISSION PAVILION FOR INCURABLES, CITY HOSPITAL 

(January, 1904): 
For incurable cases of consumption who are recommended by the Flower Mission So- 
ciety and approved by the superintendent of the Hospital. Capacity for tuberculous 
patients: — 26. Rates: — ^There are no charges. Superintendent:— Dr. J. L. Freeland. 

INDIANAPOLIS TUBERCULOSIS COLONY (May 4, 1909): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 16. Rates: — ^There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent : — -Dr. Jewett W. Reed, Market and Senate Streets. Application should be made 
at the Tuberculosis Clinic. 

SOUTH BEND 

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS PAVILIONS (January i, 

1909): 
For all classes of consumptives. Capacity of tuberculosis department : — 16. Rates : 
— ^There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. C. B. Crumpacker, 206 W. Jeff Street. 

SOUTH BEND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS CAMP, River Park (June 26, 1908): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — Free for indigent cases; others, 
$9.00 per week. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Walter H. Baker. Secretary: — Mrs. 
Mary S. Robinson, 925 West Washington Avenue, South Bend. Note: — County took over 
this colony on September i, 1910, but Anti-Tuberculosis League stiH continues to provide 
medical supervision and administration. Application should be made to the secretary of 
the medical staff. Dr. R. L. Sensenick, Jefferson Building, South Bend. 



IOWA 
OAKDALE 

STATE SANATORIUM FOR THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS (Febru- 
ary I, 1908): 

For incipient cases or those who offer a fair chance of recovery. Capacity: — 120. 
Rates: — $30.00 per month for those who are able to pay; otherwise expenses are paid by the 
State. Superintendent and Medical Director: — Dr. H. E. Kirschner. Application 
should be made to examining physicians of the different counties, who fill out admission blanks 
and send them to the superintendent, who, in turn, decides on the suitability of the applicant. 



DAVENPORT 

SCOTT COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

In the fall of 1910, the voters of Scott County by a large majority approved of a bond 

issue of $20,000 for a county isolation hospital, with special provision for tuberculous patients. 

Owing to_ an irregularity in the election, the bonds were declared illegal, but legislation is 

expected in 191 1 legalizing them. 

DES MOINES 

RIDGE CAMP (1909): . 

For all classes of cases. Capacity : — 14. Rates : — There are no charges. Secretary : 
— H. S. Hollingsworth. Application should be made at the Associated Charities, by whom 
the camp is conducted. 

25 



SANATORIA IOWA, KANSAS, KENTUCKY 

FORT DODGE 

BOULDER LODGE SANATORIUM (July, 1901): 

Exclusively for the treatment of early cases of all forms of tuberculosis. Capacity: — 25. 
Rates: — S25.00 per week. Medical Director: — Dr. J. VV. Kime. Application should 
be made to the Medical Director. 

JEFFERSON COUNTY 

JEFFERSON COUNTY HOSPITAL (1911) (not yet in operation) : 
A general hospital which will receive all classes of tuberculosis cases in a special build- 
ing. Capacity for tuberculosis patients: — 12. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 

WASHINGTON COUNTY HOSPITAL (191 1) (not yet in operation): 

A general hospital which will receive alt classes of tuberculosis cases in a special building. 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 12. 



KANSAS 
STATE SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) 

In 191 1 the Legislatvure appropriated $50,000 for a State sanatorium, to be erected in 191 1 
by an Advisory Commission of four. 



ROSEDALE 

ELEANOR TAYLOR BELL MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS TENTS 

(September, 1907): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 6. Rates: — $12.00 
to $15.00 per week. Superintendent: — Dr. George Howard Hoxie. 

TOPEKA 

HEALTH CAMP OF TOPEKA ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PRE- 
VENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (April i, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 11. Rates:— $5.00 per 
week. Medical Director: — Dr. W. M. Mills, Central Baiik Building. Application should 
be made at the tuberculosis dispensary. 

WICHITA 

SEDGWICK HOME, 223 West 3rd Street (April, 1910): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 6. Rates: — There 
are no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. M. W. Woods. Application should be 
made at the Associated Charities, by whom the Home is conducted. 



KENTUCKY 

HENDERSON 

HENDERSON TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (not yet in operation): 

A small fund has been collected for a county sanatorium, and plans have been perfected 
or the erection of such an institution in 191 1. 

26 



SANATORIA KENTUCKY, LOUISIANA 

LOUISVILLE (R. F. D. 2) 

THE HAZELWOOD SANATORIUM (September 9, 1907): 

For curable cases, or those promising to derive permanent benefit. Capacity: — 34. 
Rates: — $10.00 per week, which includes all expenses except a small charge for personal 
laundry. Medical Director: — Dr. Dunning S. Wilson. Application: — Patients are ad- 
mitted only upon personal examination by the Medical Director. 

OUCHTERLONY HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

The Late Dr. John A. Ouchterlony, of Louisville, left a fund of $35,000 to erect and equip 
a tuberculosis hospital in Kentuck3^ The money was left in the hands of John W. Barr, Jr., 
John T. Malone, and the Rev. Charles Raffo. This board of trustees has selected a suitable 
site for such hospital, near Louisville. When completed, the institution will be turned over 
to the Nazarene Sisters, of Nelson County, Kentucky, who have agreed to maintain it there- 
after. The institution will be eleemosynary in character. 

WAVERLYHILL SANATORIUM OF BOARD OF TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL 

(July 26, 1910) : 
For incipient cases. Capacity : — 40. Rates : — $3.00 to $5.00 per week for those able to 
pay; otherwise free. Superintendent: — Dr. S. Wickes Merritt. Medical Director: — Dr. 
Dunning S. Wilson. Application should be made to the Medical Director, 121 W. Chestnut 
Street, Louisville. Note: — This is a municipal institution. 

PADUCAH 

PADUCAH TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (1911) (not yet in operation): 
Capacity: — 10. Rates: — There are no charges. Secretary: — A.R.Meyers. Note: 
— Owned and operated by the Paducah Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuber- 
culosis. 



LOUISIANA 



COVINGTON 

COVINGTON TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (December 16, 1904): 

For all classes of cases, except the far advanced. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $125.00 

per month. Medical Director: — Dr. Wallace J. Durel. Application should be made to 

the Medical Director. 

DOCTOR AMES' TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (August i, 1909): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity : — 100. Rates : — $25.00 per week. Resident Phy- 
sician and Proprietor: — Dr. E. Y. Ames. Application should be made to the proprietor. 

HAMMOND 

DOCTOR McGEHEE'S COTTAGE COLONY (1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 24. Rates: — $1.00 to 
$5.00 per day. Medical Director:— Dr. E. L. McGehee. Application should be made to 
the Medical Director, 1227 Maison Blanche Building, New Orleans, La. 

NEW ORLEANS 

CAMP HYGEIA (March 18, 190S): 

For incipient cases. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — There are no charges. Application 
should be made at the office of the Louisiana Anti-Tuberculosis League, 1309 Tulane 
Avenue. Note : — The Camp is located outside of the city. 

27 



SANATORIA . MAINE, MARYLAND 

STATE CHARITY HOSPITAL OF NEW ORLEANS: 

A general hospital admitting cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in all stages. Capacity 
for tuberculous patients: — 40. Rates: — There are no charges. House Surgeon: — 
Dr. J. A. Danna. Application should be made at the hospital. 



MAINE 



HEBRON 

THE MAINE SANATORIUM (November i, 1904) :_ 

Exclusively for incipient cases of pidmonary tuberculosis. Capacity: — 100. Rates: — 

$14.00 per week. Llany patients from Maine are taken at reduced prices. Superinten- 
dent: — Dr. Estes Nichols. Application should be made to the Superintendent, Congress 

Building, Portland, or at Hebron. Note: — Conducted by a private society but serves as a 

State sanatorium. , 



ANDOVER 

GLENELLIS SANATORIUM (January i, 1905): 

Receives incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity for tuberculous pa- 
tients: — TO. Rates: — $2.00 to $5.00 per day; $12.00 to $25.00 per week; $48.00 to $100.00 
per month. Superintendent: — Dr. F. E. Leslie. Application should be made to the 
Superintendent. 

BANGOR 

CAMP OF THE BANGOR ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (November, 

1910): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 6. Rates: — $5.00 per 
week. Nurse in charge: — Miss Alice Clements. 

FAIRFIELD 

SANATORIUM AND DAY CAMP OF CENTRAL MAINE ANTI-TUBERCULO- 
SIS ASSOCIATION (October 12, 1910): 
Capacity : — 25. Rates : — $4.00 per week. Resident Physician and Medical Direc- 
tor: — Dr. A. A. Downs. Application should be made to the Medical Director. 



MARYLAND 



SABILLASVILLE 

MARYLAND STATE SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (190S): 
For all cases of tuberculosis which are deemed curable. White persons only admitted. 
Capacity: — 225. Appropriation in 1910 provides for 200 additional beds. Rates: — 50 
cents per day. Superintendent: — Dr. Victor F. Cullen. Application blanks for admis- 
sion may be obtained from the municipal or county Health Officer in the district in which the 
applicant lives, or by writing to any member of the Board of Directors. Applicants must 
have been residents of the State of Maryland for at least one year preceding the date of 
application. 



28 



SANATORIA MARYLAND, MASSACHUSETTS 

BALTIMORE 

HOSPITAL FOR THE RELIEF OF CRIPPLED AND DEFORMED CHILDREN 
OF BALTIMORE (i8qs) : 

Receives children with non-pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity for tuberculous 
patients : — 50. Rates : — There are City, State, endowed and pay beds. Superintendent : 
—Dr. R. T. Taylor, 2000 N. Charles St. Resident Physician:— Henry W. Kenwood. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL: 

For destitute tuberculosis patients of Baltimore. Capacity: — 165. Rates: — There 
are no charges; no pay patients are received. Physician in charge: — Dr. Gordon Wilson, 
1318 N. Charles St. Application: — Control of and admission to the hospital is lodged in the 
hands of the Supervisors of City Charities. 

REISTERSTOWN 

JEWISH HOME FOR CONSUMPTIVES OF BALTIMORE CITY (July i, 1908): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 46. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. Louis Rubin. Application for admission should be made to the Superin- 
tendent, or to Louis H. Levin, Secretary, 411 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore. 

TOWSON 

THE HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES OF MARYLAND, EUDOWOOD 

SANATORIUM (1896): 
For white citizens of Maryland in incipient and advanced stages of tuberculosis. Ca- 
pacity: — 112, including a sanatorium for incipient cases with 50 beds; a hospital fpr advanced 
cases with 34 beds; a farm colony for convalescent, arrested, or cured cases with 13 beds; 
and 15 beds at the sanatorium and hospital occupied by employed ex-patients, who continue 
in a measure to take the "cure." A training-school for nurses is also maintained for women 
who have had tuberculosis. Rates: — $3.00 to $12.00 per week to those able to pay; free to 
others. Resident Physician: — Dr. Martin F. Sloan. Applications for admission are 
made to the resident physician, who attends, on three mornings of the week, the tuberculo- 
sis clinic of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

WASHINGTON GROVE 

STARMONT SANATORIUM (October, 1905): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity:— 35. Rates:— $10.00 to 
$15.00 per week. Resident Physician: — Dr. John H. Lindsey. Medical Director: — 
Gen. George M. Sternbei-g, 2005 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, D. C. Application 
should be made to the Resident Physician or the Medical Director. 



MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLEBORO 

LAKEVILLE STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (January, 1910): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 150. Rates: — $4.00 per week; indigent cases 

treated at town or state expense. Superintendent and Resident Physician: — Dr. 

Sumner Coohdge. Application may be made to any registered physician in the State of 

Massachusetts. 

NORTH READING 

NORTH READING STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (September 22, 

1909): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 150. Rates: — $4.00 per week; indigent cases 

29 



SANATORIA MASSACHUSETTS 

treated at town or state expense. Superintendent and Resident Physician: — Dr. E. B. 
Emerson. Application may be made to any registered physician in the State of Massa- 
chusetts. 

RUTLAND 

RUTLAND STATE SANATORIUM (October, 189S): 

For early cases of jjulmonary tuberculosis; patients must be citizens of the United States 
not loo far advanced to admit of reasonable hope of radical improv'ement. Capacity: — 350. 
Rates:— S4. 00 per week; indigent cases treated at town or state e.\-pense. There are no 
free beds, but in many cases the bills are paid by cities or charitable organizations. Super- 
intendent: — Dr. P. ChalUs Bartlett. Application may be made to any registered physi- 
cian in the State of Massachusetts. 

WESTFIELD 

WESTFIELD STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (February, 1910): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 150. Rates: — .l!!4.oo per week; indigent cases 

treated at town or state expense. Superintendent and Resident Physician: — Dr. H. 

D. Chadwick. Application may be made to any registered physician in the State of 

Massachusetts. 

TEWKSBURY 

STATE INFIRMARY (Tuberculosis building opened in 1900): 

Separate buildings for consumptives who are state charges; all classes of cases are re- 
ceived. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 300. Rates: — There are no charges. Su- 
perintendent: — Dr. John H. Nichols. Application: — Admission is granted by the Over- 
seers of the Poor. 



ADAMS 

SUMMER CAMP SANATORIUM OF ADAMS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSO- 
CIATION (August 8, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 10. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Superintendent: — Miss Elizabeth Collins. 

BOSTON 

BOSTON CONSUMPTIVES HOSPITAL AND DAY CALIP (Main Hospital build- 
ing opened October 26, 1909): 

Capacity: — 2 so. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. 
Simon F. Cox. Resident Physician:— Dr. F. P. McCarthy. Chief of Staff :— Dr. Edwin 
A. Locke. Application should be made at the Out-patient Department, 13 Burroughs Place. 

CHANNING HOME, Francis and Bellevue Streets (1857) : 

For white women in all stages of pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity: — 23. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Superintendent: — Mrs. E. P. Fennell. There is no resident 
physician, but an attending staff: — Dr. William H. Smith and Dr. Frederick T. Lord. 
Application for admission should be made to any of the staff or to the Superintendent. 

THE CULLIS CONSUMPTIVES' HOME, Grove Ilall Station, Boston (1864): 
For persons in the last stages of pulmonary tuberculosis who are without means of support 
or friends able to care for them. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — There are no charges. Su- 
perintendent: — Rev. Edward D. Mallory. Application should be made to the Superin- 
tendent. 

FREE HOME FOR CONSUMPTIVES IN THE CITY OF BOSTON, 428 Quincy 

Street, Dorchester (1892): 
For poor consumptives of every age, stage, nationality, creed, and color. Capacity: — 

30 



SANATORIA MASSACHUSETTS 

no. Rates: — There are no charges. There is no resident physician, but the list of visiting 
and consulting physicians inckides the names of well-known specialists. Application for 
admission should be made at the Home. 

THE HOUSE OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN, corner Francis and Binney Streets 

(1861): 
Gives free care and medical treatment to white women and children; patients are re- 
ceived in all stages of tuberculosis, and are separated from other patients. Capacity for 
tuberculous patients: — 68, of which 25 beds are in day camps. Rates: — There are no 
charges. Superintendent: — Miss Louise Coleman. Visiting Physicians: — Dr. Arthur 
K. Stone and Dr. Roger I. Lee. Application for admission should be made to the Superin- 
tendent between the hours of g and 12. 

McCREIGHT SANITARIUM, 56-58 Bowdoin Avenue, Dorchester (1904): 
Receives incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity for tuberculous pa- 
tients: — 12. Rates: — $8.00 to $25.00 per week. Physician in charge: — Dr. William B. 
Keelor. 

LONG ISLAND HOSPITAL, Boston Harbor: 

A general hospital, admitting all classes of destitute consumptives. Capacity: — 85. 
Resident Physician: — Dr. George W. Holmes. Superintendent: — Dr. Charles E. Don- 
Ian. Application should be made to the Institutions Registration Department, 28 Court 
Square, Boston. 

PRENDERGAST CAMP, Harvard and Ashland Streets (Aug. 6, 1909): 
For male patients discharged as arrested and able to work from State and other sanatoria. 
Capacity : — 12. Rates : — $6.00 per week. Application should be made to the Boston Asso- 
ciation for Relief and Control of Tuberculosis, 4 Joy Street. 

ST. MONICA'S HOME, 125 Highland Street, Roxbury (1888): 

Receives tuberculosis cases in all stages; for colored women and children only. Capacity 
for tuberculous patients: — 10. Rates: — $5.00 to I8.00 per week. Most of the patients 
are supported by the city. Superintendent: — Sister Vera Margaret. Application should 
be made to the Superintendent. 

ROOKLINE 

BROOKLINE BOARD OF HEALTH HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS DEPART- 
MENT (1905): 

For men in advanced stages. Capacity: — 6. Rates: — 17.00 per week, if board is paid 
by patient or other party; others are admitted free. Superintendent and Visiting Physi- 
cian: — Dr. H. Lincoln Chase. Matron and Resident Nurse: — Miss Martha W. Meek. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent or to the Board of Health. 

DAY CAMP FOR CHILDREN (July 2, 1908): 

For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — There are no 
charges. Medical Director: — Dr. H. Lincoln Chase. Camp Physician: — Dr. Arthur A. 
Gushing. Application should be made either to the Anti-Tuberculosis Society, the Board 
of Health, or the Camp Physician. 

CAMBRIDGE 

CAMBRIDGE TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL, Concord Avenue (July 23, 1908): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity : — 60. Rates : — Permanent patients, $8.00 per week 

for residents of Cambridge; $10.00 per week for non-residents; day patients, $3.50 per week. 

Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Bradford H. Pierce. Resident Physician: — Dr. Felix 

F. McGirr. Application should "be made to the Board of Health. 

HOLY GHOST HOSPITAL FOR INCURABLES, Cambridge Street (1894): 
Receives advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity of tuberculosis department:— 45. 

31 



SANATORIA MASSACHUSETTS 

Rates: — 25 free beds; S7.00 per week for others in wards. Superintendent: — Sister N. 
D'Arche. Medical Director: — Dr. John S. Sommers. Application should be made to the 
Superintendent. 

CHELSEA 

SOLDIERS' HOME (igoQ): 

Receives all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 12. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Physician in charge of tuberculosis department: — Dr. G. H. 
Maxfield. 

CLINTON 

TUBERCULOSIS CAMP OF THE CLINTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE RE- 
LIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS, Box 67 (May 21, 1900): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 8. Rates: — $4.00 to $6.00 per week. Matron: 
— Mrs. Jacob Bowman. Medical Director:— Dr. Irene M. Morse. Application should 
be made to the Medical Director. 

EAST BRIDGEWATER 

THE MILLET SANATORIUM (May, 1900): 

Exclusively for curable cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — 
S15.00 to S40.00 per week; a limited number of patients can be received at reduced rates. 
Medical Director: — Dr. C. S. Millet, Brockton, Mass. Application should be made to 
the i\Iillet Sanatorium. 

FALL RIVER 

BAY VIEW HOSPITAL, Corner of Bay and Woodman Street Quly 1, 1907; new 
hospital in December i, 1910): 

For moderately advanced and advanced cases; incipient cases are received only tempora- 
rily until they can be removed to a State sanatorium. Capacity: — 60. Rates : — There are 
no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. David H. Fuller. Application should be 
made to the Board of Health. 

HOLYOKE 

DAY CAMP FOR CONSUMPTIVES (June i, 1908): 

For moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — Actual cost of mainte- 
nance for those who are able to pay; others free, or according to their means. Medical Di- 
rector : — Dr. C. A. Allen. Application should be made to the Medical Director. Residents 
of Holyoke are given the preference. 

MUNICIPAL TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION AT POOR FARM (not yet in opera- 
tion) (191 1): 
Capacity: — 28. Note: — This pavilion will be erected in 1911. 

LAWRENCE 

DAY CAMP OF THE LAWRENCE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (May 16, 
1908): 

For ambulant cases. Capacity:— 16. Rates :— There are no charges. Medical Di- 
rector: — Dr. H. F. Dearborn. Application should be made to the Medical Director. 

MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL FOR TUBERCULOSIS (October 26, 1910): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity :— 88. Rates :— $4.00 per week for city cases; $1 2.00 

per week for non-residents. Medical Director: — Dr. A. L. Siskind. Application should 

be made to the Medical Director. 

32 



SANATORIA MASSACHUSETTS 

LOWELL 

LOWELL GENERAL HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS CAMP (1906): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 28. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent: — Miss Sara A. Bowen. Application should be made at the hospital. 

LUNNENBURG 

HILLCROFT (October i, 1909): 

For any case not in the last stages. Capacity: — 4- Rates: — $2.00 per day and 
$10.00 to $15.00 per week. Superintendent: — Mrs. George Justice Ewing. Visiting 
Physician: — Dr. Robert A. Rice. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

LYNN 

LYNN TUBERCULOSIS CAMP (July, 1909) : 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases; children given the preference. Capacity : 
— 20. Rates: — $4.00 per week; no charge to worthy cases; Board of Health assists by 
pajdng $4.00 per week for city cases. Resident Physician and Medical Director: — 
Dr. H. P. Bennett, 41 Lewis Street. Application should be made to the Medical Director. 

NEW BEDFORD 

SANATORIUM OF THE NEW BEDFORD ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSO- 
CIATION (January 26, 1908; new sanatorium in 191 1): 

For all classes of needy consumptives. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no fixed 
charges. Medical Director: — Dr. E. F. Cody. Application should be made to the Medi- 
cal Director. Note: — A new sanatorium was begun early in 1910 at Sassaquin on the out- 
skirts of New Bedford, and will be completed in 191 1. The sanatorium in the city will then 
be abandoned. 

NEWTON LOWER FALLS 

NEWTON HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (April, 1910): 

Capacity: — 10. Rates:— $15.00 per week. Superintendent: — Miss Mary M. Riddle. 

PITTSFIELD 

SPRINGSIDE SANATORIUM (December, 1906): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — $18.00 per 
week. Superintendent: — Miss Mary E. SuUivan. Application should be made to the 
Superintendent. 

QUINCY 

CAMP MOUNT PLEASANT (May 28, 1910): 

For advanced and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 10 for day and night pa- 
tients; 50 for day patients only. Rates: — $1.00 per day. President: — Henry M. Faxon. 
Application should be made to the President. 

RUTLAND 

CENTRAL ELM SANATORIUM (1909) : 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 18. Rates: — $8.00 to 
$10.00 per week. Physician in Charge : — Dr. George N. Lapham. Application should be 
made to the Physician in Charge. 

THE CRANE SANATORIUM (November 12, 1910): 

For promising cases in any stage. Capacity :— 20. Rates : — $15.00 to $25.00 per week. 
Consulting Physician: — Dr. Walter C. Bailey. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Bayard 
T. Crane. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

3 23 



SANATORIA MASSACHUSETTS 

HUNTRESS HOUSE (1909): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — $10.00 to $15.00 per week. Phy- 
sician in Charge : — Dr. George N. Lapham. Application should be made to the Physician 
in Charge. 

MAPLE LODGE SANATORIUM (October, 1906): 

For Incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — $15.00 to 
$18.00 per week. Physician in charge: — Dr. George N. Lapham. Superintendent: — 
Miss Rose M. Bodman. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

PINE COTTAGE (1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 11. Rates: — $8.00 to 
$10.00 per week. Physician in Charge : — Dr. George N. Lapham. Application should be 
made to the Physician in Charge. 

POWER COTTAGE (1909): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 6. Rates: — $8.00 per week. Physician in 
Charge : — Dr. George N. Lapham. Application should be made to the Physician in Charge. 

WACHUSETT COTTAGE (1903): 

For promising cases in any stage. Capacity: — 15. Rates: — $12.00 to $15.00 per week. 
Attending Physician : — Dr. Bayard T. Crane. Application should be made to the Attend- 
ing Physician. 

SALEM 

HOSPITAL FOR CONTAGIOUS DISEASES (December, 1907): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 8. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Augustus 

H. Galvin. Physician in charge : — Dr. WiUiam H, Noyce. 

SALEM DAY CAMP (July i, 1908): 

Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Miss Teresa A. 
Trepaney. Medical Director : — Dr. Walter G. Phippen. Application should be made to 
the Superintendent, 10 Washington Square, West. 

SHARON 

THE SHARON SANATORIUM (February, 1891): 

For women of limited means who are in comparatively early stages of pulmonary tu- 
berculosis; not for the far advanced. Capacity: — 23. Rates: — $10.00 per week, exclusive 
of laundry. Medical Director: — Dr. Vincent Y. Bowditch, Boston. Resident Physi- 
cian:— Dr. Walter A. Griffin. Superintendent: — Miss Alice R.Hodges. Application 
must be made to the Superintendent. 

SOMERVILLE 

CITY OF SOMERVILLE, HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES (not yet in opera- 
tion) (1911): 

Capacity: — 30. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. Frank L. 
Morse. 

SPRINGFIELD 

SUMMER CAMP OF THE SPRINGFIELD ASSOCIATION FOR THE PRE- 
VENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (June 4, 1908): 

For early cases only. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $2.50 per week for those able to pay. 
Medical Director: — Dr. Ralph B. Ober. 

WALTHAM 

WALTHAM TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 
Provision has been made for a mimicipal tuberculosis hospital, but the site has not yet 
been chosen. 

34 



SANATORIA MICHIGAN 

WELLESLEY HILLS 

THE CONVALESCENT HOME OF THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL (1903): 
Receives children wlio have been under treatment for tuberculous diseases of bones, 
glands, etc., in the Children's Hospital of Boston. Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 35, 
though more can be cared for if necessary. (Pulmonary tuberculosis not treated.) Rates : — 
$7.00 per week or whatever the patients can pay. Superintendent: — Sister Susanna Mar- 
garet. Secretary: — Mrs. H. S. Hunnewell, 146 Beacon Street, Boston. Application 
should be made at the Children's Hospital, Huntington Avenue, Boston. 



MICHIGAN 
HOWELL 

MICHIGAN STATE SANATORIUM (September i, 1907): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 16. Superintendent: — Dr. Eugene B. Pierce. 
Rates: — $11.50 per week. Those unable to pay are cared for as state and county charges. 
Application should be made on printed blanks to the Superintendent through a regular 
examining physician. 



ANN ARBOR 

SANATORIUM OF THE ANN ARBOR ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVEN- 
TION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (not yet in operation): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 10. Rates: — $10.00 up 
per week. Chairman of Committee : — Dr. A. W. Hewlett. 

DETROIT 

DETROIT TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (January, 191 1): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 40. Superintendent: — Dr. H. A. Shankwiler. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH (July, 1908): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 75. Rates:— There are no charges. Medical 
Director: — Dr. G. L. Kiefer. Attending Physician: — Dr. V. C. Vaughan, Jr. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Board of Health. 

ELOISE 

WAYNE COUNTY HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT (1904): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 24. Rates:— There 

are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. J. J. Marker. Application should be made to the 

Superintendent of the Poor at Detroit. 

GRAND RAPIDS 

MUNICIPAL TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (June, 1907): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 48. Rates: — $10.00 per week for non-residents. 

Indigent consumptives of Grand Rapids are treated free. Attending Physician: — Dr. 

Ralph Apted. Medical Director: — Dr. Clyde C. Slemons. Application should be made 

to Secretary of the Board of Health, Charles Carpenter. 

HOUGHTON 

HOUGHTON COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (January i, 1911): 
Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. W. H. 
Jackson. Application shovdd be made to the Superintendent. 

35 



SANATORIA ' MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA 

IONIA 

IONIA COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION, COUNTY FARM (not yet in 

operation): 
Capacity :—S,. Note: — An appropriation of $1,500 was made for a tuberculosis pavil- 
ion in October, igio. 

KALAMAZOO 

KALAI^IAZOO TUBERCULOSIS COLONY (April i, iqdq): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — -lo. Rates:— Si. 50 per day and $10.00 per week. 
Resident Physician: — Dr. W. E. Collins. Medical Director: — Dr. A. H. Rockewell. 
Application should be made to the Medical Director. 

MARQUETTE 

MARQUETTE COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 
Capacity: — 20. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. F. McD. 

Harkin. 

SAGINAW 

SAGINAW TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) (191 1): 
Capacity: — 12. Rates: — There are no charges. 

SAULT STE. MARIE 

CHIPPEWA COUNTY HOSPITAL (At County Poor Farm) (not yet in operation) : 

In October, 1910, a small appropriation was made for a tuberculosis pavilion to be con- 
structed at the County Poor Farm. The contract was let on December 4th and the building 
will be ready for use in 191 1. 



MINNESOTA 



WALKER 

STATE SANATORIUM FOR CONSUMPTIVES (January i, 1908): 
For persons in the early stages of pulmonary tuberculosis who have been residents of 
Minnesota for at least one year. Capacity: — 90. Rates: — $7.00 per week. No free beds, 
but county and city officials pay expenses of some patients. Superintendent and Resi- 
dent Physician: — Dr. L. B. Ohhnger. Application should be made to the local medical 
examiners in various parts of the state or to any of the city or county officials of the poor. 



DULUTH 

ST. LOUIS COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (191 1) (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 

For incipient and advanced cases. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — .$7. 00 per week. Medi- 
cal Director: — Dr. William M. Hart. Note: — Hospital being erected by County Sana- 
torium Commission. Details of administration not yet settled. Application should be made 
to the Medical Director. 

TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION OF THE COUNTY FARM (January, 1910): 
For consumptives resident at the county farm in all stages of the disease. Capacity: — 
30. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. Robert Graham. 

36 



SANATORIA MINNESOTA, MISSOURI 

GLADSTONE 

CUENCA SANATORIUM, R. F. D. No. 2 (January 25, 1910)— Owned and operated 
by the St. Paul Anti-Tuberculosis Committee: 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity:— 20. Rates: — $1.00 per 
day; $7.00 per week. MedicalDirector: — Dr. H. Longstreet Taylor. Resident Nurse: 
— Miss Olive Rosenhaug. Application should be made to the St. Paul Anti-Tuberculosis 
Committee, 61 East 6th Street, B. Rosing, Executive Secretary. 

MINNEAPOLIS 

HOPEWELL HOSPITAL (Tuberculosis Department of Minneapolis City Hospital) 
(Aug. I, 1908): 

For indigent advanced cases. Capacity: — no. Rates: — There are no charges. 
Superintendent : — Dr. Herbert O. Collins. Application should be made to the superin- 
tendent. 

SUMMER CAMP FOR CHILDREN OF VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION 

(July, 1908): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Superintendent: — Dr. C. B. Wright. Head Nurse:— Miss Miimie F. Paterson. 

THE THOMAS HOSPITAL (October i, 1908): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 48. Rates: — $10.00 per week for ward patients; 
$12, $15 and $20 for private rooms. Superintendent: — Miss Emilie M. Eggen, 2340 Sixth 
Street, South. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

PINE CITY 

POKEGAMA SANATORIUM (1905): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — $16 to $30 per week. Medical 
Director: — Dr. H. L. Taylor. Superintendent: — Dr. E. B. Daugherty. Application 
should be made to the Medical Director, Lowry Arcade, St. Paul. 

ST. PAUL 

CUENCA SANATORIUM (See Gladstone, Minn.). 

EVA SHAPIRO MEMORIAL CAMP FOR PREDISPOSED AND ANEMIC 
CHILDREN (See White Bear Lake, Minn.). 

WHITE BEAR LAKE 

EVA SHAPIRO MEMORIAL CAMP FOR PREDISPOSED AND AN.SMIC 

CHILDREN (August 8, 1910) — Under the control and management of the St. Paul 

Anti-Tuberculosis Committee : 

Capacity: — 20. Rates: — There are no charges. Matron: — Miss Margaret Blank. 

Application should be made to the St. Paul Anti-Tuberculosis Committee, 61 East 6th Street, 

St. Paul, B. Rosing, Executive Secretary. 



MISSOURI 



MOUNT VERNON 

MISSOURI STATE SANATORIUM FOR THE TREATMENT OF INCIPIENT 

TUBERCULOSIS (August i, 1907): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 155. Rates: — Pay patients, $50.00 per month. 
Free patients are sent by their counties, which pay $5.00 per week. The State pays deficit, 

37 



SANATORIA MISSOURI, MONTANA 

which is $6.25 per week. Superintendent: — Dr. John Stewart. Resident Physician: — 
Dr. Carlos C. Enghsh. Application should be made through the local medical examiners 
to the Superintendent. 



KANSAS CITY 

KANSAS CITY TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION, Twenty-second and Cherry Streets 
(October 15, 1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 22. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. E. W. Schauffler, 317 Argyle Building. Application 
should be made to the Medical Director. 

MUNICIPAL TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) : 
In 1910 the voters of the city approved a bond issue of $75,000 for a municipal tubercu- 
losis sanatorium to be erected on city land at Leeds, about nine miles from the city. 

QUARANTINE 

ROBERT KOCH HOSPITAL (September 21, 1910): 

For all classes of consumptives. Capacity: — 120. Rates:— There are no charges. 
Superintendent: — Dr. M. J. D^\yer. Application should be made to the Hospital 
Department of the City of St. Louis. Note: — ^This is a municipal hospital for the city of 
St. Louis. 

ST. JOSEPH 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT: 

For all classes of consumptives. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 5. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. E. S. Ballard. 

ST. LOUIS 

JEWISH HOME FOR INCURABLES AND CONSUMPTIVES (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 
An organization was perfected in 1910 for the erection of this institution, but up to Jan- 
uary I, 191 1, nothing further had been done, except to secure an option on a site. 

MOUNT ST. ROSE HOSPITAL, 9100 South Broadway (1902): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 75. Rates: — $5.00 to $25.00 per week for those 

able to pay; others admitted free if there is room. Medical Director: — Dr. Louis C. 

Boisliniere. Application for admission should be made to Mount St. Rose Hospital. 

ROBERT KOCH HOSPITAL (See Quarantine, Mo.). 

ST. LOUIS CHILDREN'S FREE HOSPITAL (1910): 

For tuberculous children. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 7. Rates: — There 
are no charges. 



MONTANA 
STATE SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) 

The legislature of 191 1 voted to estabhsh the Montana State Tuberculosis Sanitarium 
and appropriated $20,000 for the erection and $10,000 for the maintenance of the institution. 
The sanatorium will be erected in 1911. 

38 



SANATORIA NEBRASKA, NEW HAMPSfflRE, NEW JERSEY 

NEBRASKA 
STATE SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) 

The Legislature in 191 1 appropriated $40,000 for a State sanatorium, which will prob- 
ably be erected in 191 1. 



OMAHA 

DOUGLAS COUNTY HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS WARD (June, 1908): 
For consumptive inmates of the County Hospital. Capacity:— 30. Rates: — There 
are no charges. Superintendent: — Andrew Farrar. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



WARREN SUMMIT 

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE SANATORIUM (September, 1909): 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 34. Rates: — 

$10.00 per week. If applicant cannot pay $10.00, State Board of Charities and Correction 

determines rate. Average rate per week, $4.75. Superintendent: — Dr. J. E. Runnells. 

Application should be made to a state sanatorium examiner in the district where the patient 

resides. 



CONCORD 

PEMBROKE SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (1901): 

For early and moderately advanced cases of consumption. Capacity: — 35. Rates:— 

$15.00 to $25.00 per week. President: — Rev. Thomas Chalmers, D.D., Manchester. 

Superintendent: — Jennie M. Fontaine, R.N. Application for admission should be made 

to Physician in charge, Pembroke Sanatorium, Concord, N. H. 

GRASMERE 

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (not 
yet in operation) : 

An appropriation of $15,000 has been made by Hillsborough Coimty to erect a tuber- 
culosis pavilion at the county hospital. The pavilion will accommodate about 40 patients 
and will be opened in 191 1. 



NEW JERSEY 

GLEN GARDNER 

NEW JERSEY SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOUS DISEASES (Oct. 25, 1907) : 

A State sanatorium for cases of a curable nature. Capacity: — 170. Rates: — $5.00 

per week. Patients are admitted without charge whose inabihty to pay $5.00 a week is 

determined by a competent court. Superintendent: — Dr. Samuel B. English. Resident 

Physician: — Dr. H. B. Dunham. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

39 



SANATORIA NEW JERSEY 

BELLEVILLE (Essex County) 

TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT OF ESSEX COUNTY HOSPITAL FOR CON- 
TAGIOUS DISEASES (April, 1911): 

For advanced cases only. Capacity: — 96. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. Henry E. Ricketts. Application should be made to the Superintendent or 
to the city Dispensary. 

FARMINGDALE 

TUBERCULOSIS PREVENTORIUM FOR CHILDREN (July, 1909): 
For children between the ages of four and fourteen years who are surrounded in their 
homes by individuals who have open tuberculosis. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Superintendent:— Mrs. A. James. Medical Director: — Dr. Alfred F. 
Hess, 154 West 72nd Street, New York City. Application is granted through the clinics 
in the New York City and Brooklj^n Associations of Tuberculosis Clinics. 

HACKENSACK 

HILL CREST OPEN AIR SANATORIUM (April, 1907): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — Private 
rooms, $15.00 to $25.00 per week; wards, $10.00 to $12.00 per week. Medical Director: — 
Dr. Horace Greeley, Pacific and Clinton Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y. Application should be 
made to the Medical Director at the sanatorium or at his office from i to 2 P. M. daily except 
Saturday and Sunday. 

NEWARK 

DAY CAMP OF THE NEWARK ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION, 425 

South Orange Avenue (June 28, 1909): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — ^There are 
no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. T. W. Corwin. Nurse in charge: — Mrs. 
Eleanor A. Fornachon. Application should be made to the Newark Anti-Tuberculosis 
Association, 40 Clinton Street. 

TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT OF THE ESSEX COUNTY HOSPITAL FOR 
CONTAGIOUS DISEASES (See BeUeville). 

NEWARK CITY HOSPITAL (April, 1909): 

A general hospital, admitting advanced cases of tuberculosis only. Capacity: — 36. 
Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Charles E. Talbot. Application 
should be made to the Superintendent. 

NEWARK CITY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (See Verona). 

NORTH VINELAND 

THE GROVE (January, 19 10): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 10. Rates: — $10.00 to $15.00 per week; chil- 
dren $7.00 to $10.00 per week. Superintendent: — Miss Agnes J. Brophy Smith, P. 0. Box 
3 7 A. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

ORANGE 

DAY CAMP OF THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF THE ORANGES 

(July 7, 1909): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 15. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Resident Physician : — Dr. Ralph H. Hunt. Application should be made at 

the office of the Anti-Tuberculosis League. 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 224 Essex Avenue (Special building opened in 1906): 
A general hospital with a separate pavilion for all tuberculosis cases. Capacity of the 

40 



SANATORIA NEW JERSEY, NEW MEXICO 

tuberculosis building: — 26. Rates: — For patients able to pay, $8.00 per week. Super- 
intendent:— Miss Grace E. Stamp. Physician in Charge:— Dr. K^lph H. Hunt. Appli- 
cation for admission should be made at the office of the Hospital. 

PASSAIC 

CITY HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (July 31, 1909): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 14. Rates: — There are no charges. Health 
Officer: — Dr. Nelson Elliot. Application should be made to the Health Officer. 

PATERSON 

PATERSON ISOLATION HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (January 
30, 1910): 

For advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity :— 40. Rates:— There are no charges. 
Visiting Physician: — Dr. Frank E. Agnew. Superintendent:— Patrick Croughan. 
Application should be made to the Board of Health. 

PLAINFIELD 

PLAINFIELD TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (December i, 1909): 

For incipient cases. Capacity: — 8. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: 

—Miss Josephine Hughes. Medical Director:— Dr. F. J. Hughes. Application should 

be made to the Medical Director. 

SECAUCUS 

HUDSON COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (October, 1909): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 132. Medical Director: — Dr. Berthold S. 

Pollak, 241 Grove Street, Jersey City, N. J. Application should be made to the Medical 

Director. 

UNION COUNTY 

UNION COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

In 1910 the Board of Freeholders appropriated $50,000 for a county tuberculosis hospital. 
A site has been selected and buildings will be erected in 191 1. 

VERONA 

NEWARK CITY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (April i, 1908): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — $5 .00 per 
week; there are four private beds. Superintendent: — Miss Edith Riley. Applica- 
tion should be made at the Newark City Dispensary on Broad Street. 



NEW MEXICO 



ALAMOGORDO 

ALAMO COTTAGE SANATORIUM (December i, 1908): 

Capacity: — 10. Rates: — $75.00 per month. Superintendent: — Dr. O. W. Miller. 

ALAMOGORDO SANATORIUM (Succeeding Fraternal City Sanatorium in 1909. 
August, 1906): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — $15.00 per week and up. Medical 
Superintendent and Resident Physician: — Dr. W. R. Saltzgaber. Application should 
be made to the Superintendent. 

41 



SANATORIA NEW MEXICO 

ALBUQUERQUE 

ALBUQUERQUE SANATORIUM (April i, 1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 35. Rates: — $20.00 to 
S25.00 per week. Superintendent and Medical Director: — Dr. A. G. Shortle. Applica- 
tion should be made to the Superintendent. 

ST. JOSEPH'S SANATORIUM (Alay, 1902; special building for tuberculosis, Oc- 
tober, 1903) : 

Not exclusively for the treatment of tuberculosis patients, but the annex is reserved for 
their accommodation; all stages of the disease are received. Capacity of Annex: — 40. 
Rates: — There are 15 free beds; for other patients the rates are $10.00 per week in wards; 
S15.00 to $25.00 in private rooms and in tents, $15.00. There is no resident physician, but 
a visiting and consulting staflf of fifteen. There is also a training school for nurses. Appli- 
cation should be addressed to the Sister Superior. 

SOUTHWESTERN PRESBYTERIAN SANATORIUM (July i, 1908): 
For all classes of cases, except those in the hopeless stages of the disease. Capacity : — 30, 
to be increased to 60 by April, 1911. Rates: — $45.00 per month. Superintendent: — 
Rev. Hugh A. Cooper. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

EAST LAS VEGAS 

ST. ANTHONY'S SANATORIUM (1896): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity:— 35. Rates: — $9.00 to $15.00 per week. There 
is no resident physician. Application should be made to the Sister Superior. 

FORT BAYARD 

UNITED STATES ARMY GENERAL HOSPITAL (1899): 

For tuberculous soldiers of the regular army; for discharged tuberculous soldiers who are 
beneficiaries of the Soldiers' Home, Washington, D. C; and for officers of the army on the 
active or retired list who have tuberculosis. Capacity: — 400. Rates: — For officers, $1.00 
per day. The expenses of maintenance of the other patients are defrayed from army appro- 
priations and from the funds of the Soldiers' Home. Commanding Officer: — Lt.-Col. G. E. 
Bushnell. Six other physicians are on duty at the hospital. Application should be made 
to the Surgeon-General or Adjutant-General, all admissions being by authority of the War 
Department. Civilians not connected with the military estabhshment are not admitted to 
this hospital. 

FORT STANTON (Railway and Express Station, Capitan) 

PUBLIC HEALTH AND MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE SANATORIUM (1899): 
Exclusively for the treatment of tuberculosis; admission is governed by regulations of 
the Public Health and Marine Hospital Service; eligible persons are received in any stage of 
the disease. Capacity: — 250. Rates: — There are no charges for accepted apphcants. 
Medical Officer in Command: — Passed Assistant Surgeon H. S. Mathewson; there are 
also in residence four assistant physicians and two pharmacists. Application should be 
made to the Surgeon-General, United States Public Health and Marine Hospital Service. 

LAGUNA 

LAGUNA SANATORIUM (1910): 

For tuberculous Indians. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Superinten- 
dent: — Reuben Perry, Albuquerque. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Depart- 
ment: — Dr. Fred Dillon. Note: — Conducted by the Office of Indian Affairs. 

LINCOLN 

RANCH SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (July i, 1906): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $12.50 to $15.00 per week, including 

42 



SANATORIA NEW MEXICO, NEW YORK 

all expenses at the sanatorium except medicines and laundry. Superintendent and Resi- 
dent Physician : — Dr. James W. Laws. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 
(See advertisement, p. iv.) 

SANTA FE 

ST. VINCENT'S SANATORIUM AND HOSPITAL: 

Not primarily for tuberculosis, but cases of consumption are admitted in any stage. 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 75. Rates: — $10.00 to $25.00 per week, general 
nursing included. Resident Physician : — Dr. J. H. Sloan. Application should be made 
to the Sister Superior. 

SUNMOUNT SANATORIUM (1907): 

For consumptives in the first and second stages of the disease. Capacity : — 25. Rates : 
— $15.00 per week and upward. Resident Physician: — Dr. Frank E. Mera. Business 
Manager: — J. S. Harris. Application should be made to the Business Manager. 

SILVER CITY 

NEW MEXICO COTTAGE SANATORIUM (1905): 

For pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis in curable or improvable stages of the disease. 
Capacity: — 80. Rates: — Porch cottages, $100 per month; cement cottages and infirmary, 
$95.00 per month; Tent Cottages, $90.00 per month; laryngeal treatment, nursing, medi- 
cine, and laundry extra. There are two endowed cottages. Medical Directors : — Drs. E. S. 
Bullock and Leroy S. Peters. Business Manager:— Wayne MacV. Wilson. Application 
should be made to the Business Manager. (See advertisement, p. iii.) 

ST. JOSEPH'S SANATORIUM (October, 1901): 

For cases of pulmonary tuberculosis promising cure. Capacity: — 35. Rates: — $100 
per month, including all necessary expenses. Superintendent :— Sister Dominic. Medi- 
cal Director: — Dr. Oliver T. Hyde. Application should be made to the Medical Director. 
(See advertisement, p. iv.) 

WATROUS 

VALMORA INDUSTRIAL SANATORIUM (September i, 1910): 
Capacity : — 30. Rates : — $10.00 per week. Superintendent : — Dr. William T. Brown. 
President : — Dr. E. Fletcher Ingals, 34 Washington Street, Chicago, 111. Application should 
be made to the President. Residents of Chicago are given the preference. 



NEW YORK 



RAY BROOK (Essex County) 

STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE TREATMENT OF INCIPIENT PULMONARY 
TUBERCULOSIS (July i, 1904): 

Primarily for the poor, but pay patients will be received when there is room for them; 
one year's residence in this State is a required condition. Incipient cases only are admitted. 
Capacity: — 260. Rates: — By a provision of its charter the Hospital is required to give 
preference to the indigent, admitting others only when vacancies occur. The authorities by 
whom the patient is sent are required to pay transportation to and from the Hospital and 
$5.00 per week for maintenance. Physician in Charge and Superintendent: — Dr. Albert 
H. Garvin. Application should be made to the nearest public authorities having charge of 
the relief of the poor, or to the ofi&cial medical examiners, whose names may be obtained from 
the Superintendent. 

43 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

ALBANY 

ALBANY COUNTY ALMSHOUSE: 

For advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 34. 
Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — William H. Storrs. Application 
should be made to tlie Overseers of the Poor. 

ALBANY HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (April 10, igio): 
For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity for tuberculous 
patients: — 60. Rates: — $8.00 per week; some charitable cases are received. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. Harold C. Goodwin. Application should be made to the Superintendent at 
the hospital. 

CENTRAL FEDERATION OF LABOR TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION, McCarthy 
Avenue (August i, 1908): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 14. Rates: — $1.00 per day and $7.00 per week. 
Medical Director: — Dr. Andrew McFarlane. Application should be made to the Medical 
Director. 

BATH 

NEW YORK STATE SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' HOME (January, 191 1): 
Receives all stages of the disease. Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 100. Rates : 
— There are no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. C. K. Haskell. Commandant: 
— J. E. Ewell. The Tuberculosis Department is only for inmates of the Home who have 
tuberculosis. 

BEDFORD STATION (Westchester County) 

MONTEFIORE HOME COUNTRY SANATORIUM (1897): 

Exclusively for poor consumptives in the early stages of the disease. Capacity: — 180. 
Rates: — There are no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. L. Rosenberg. Con- 
sulting Physician: — Dr. Alfred Meyer. Application should be made at the city office, 
138th Street and Broadway, New York City. (See New York, Borough of Manhattan.) 

BINGHAMTON 

MOUNTAIN SANATORIUM OF THE BINGHAMTON CITY HOSPITAL (July 9, 
igo8): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 19. Rates: — City patients are required to pay 
all or part of fees if they are able; out of town patients, full charge. Superintendent: — 
Miss Grace C. Wagner. Visiting Physician: — Dr. J. W. Sheffield. Application should be 
made to the Visiting Physician. 

BROOKLYN (See New York, Borough of Brooklyn). 

BUFFALO 

J. N. ADAM HOSPITAL FOR INCIPIENT TUBERCULOSIS (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 

For incipient cases only. Provided by grant of municipal council in 1910 of $200,000. 
Hospital will accommodate 140 patients, and will be free to indigent cases of Buffalo. It will 
not be completed before March, 191 2. President of Board of Trustees: — Dr. John H. 
Pryor. 

DAY CAMP FOR CONSUMPTIVES (July i, 1908): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — There are no charges. Physician 
in Charge: — Dr. George J. Eckel. Supervisor and Visiting Physician: — Dr. John H. 
Pryor. Application should be made to the physician in charge at the Tuberculosis Dis- 
pensary of the Buffalo Association for the Relief and Control of Tuberculosis, 165 Swan 
Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

44 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

ERIE COUNTY HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS WARD, 3399 Main Street (March 

25, 1902): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 90. Rates:— $5.00 per week if able to pay; there 
are no charges for others. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Carroll J. Roberts. 

TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION OF THE BUFFALO CITY HOSPITAL (not yet in 
operation) : 

The city officials of Buffalo in 1910 authorized the erection of a general hospital to cost 
not less than $500,000. In connection with this hospital, a special pavilion for 200 advanced 
cases of tuberculosis will be erected. The hospital will be located within the city limits. 

CATTARAUGUS COUNTY 

CATTARAUGUS COUNTY HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

Has been substantially authorized and a committee has been appointed to inspect sites 
and report in April, 191 1, to the Board of Supervisors. 

EAST BLOOMFIELD 

OAK MOUNT, ONTARIO COUNTY SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOUS 
INVALIDS (November 15, 1910): 

For incipient, moderately advanced, and advanced cases. Capacity: — 16. Rates: — 
Maximum charge, $8.50 per week. Patients pay according to their ability. Superinten- 
dent: — Dr. S. R. Wheeler. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

EAST VIEW 

WESTCHESTER COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (1904): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 64. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Superintendent: — Dr. Frank E. Russell, Tarrytown. Application should be made to the 
Superintendent of the Poor of Westchester County. Note : — This institution is part of the 
Westchester County Almshouse. 

ELMIRA 

ELMIRA CITY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM, R. F. D. No. 3 (August 2, 1909): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $10.00 per week; free to citizens of 

Elmira. Medical Director: — Dr. Arthur W. Booth. Application should be made to the 

Medical Director. 

FULTON COUNTY 

FULTON COUNTY HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

Has been substantially authorized and a committee has been appointed to inspect sites 
and report in 191 1 to the Board of Supervisors. 

GABRIELS STATION (P. O. Gabriels) 

SANATORIUM GABRIELS (1897): 

For early cases of consumption and convalescents from other pulmonary diseases. Ca- 
pacity: — 70. Rates: — From $10.00 to $15.00 per week, according to location of rooms; 
a limited number of free patients are taken. Resident Physician: — Dr. H. J. Blankemeyer. 
Application should be made to the Mother Superior. (See advertisement, p. vii.) 

JEFFERSON COUNTY 

JEFFERSON COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation): 
A site has been selected at Natural Bridge and a bond issue of $15,000 has been authorized. 
The institution will probably be erected in 191 1. 

45 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

KINGSTON 

ULSTER COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (August lo, 1909, as a camp; 
1910 as county hospital): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. A. C. Gates. Note: — Operated jointly by the county and the Tuberculosis 
Committee of the State Charities Aid Association. Application should be made to the 
^ledical Director. 

LAKE KUSHAQUA 

STONY WOLD SANATORIUM (October, 1903): 

For women and children in the early stages of tuberculosis who are not able to pay in full 
for treatment. Capacity: — 106, of whom 22 are children. The plan contemplates room for 
150. Rates: — $7.00 per week. Superintendent: — Dr. H. S. Goodall. President: — Mrs. 
James E. Newcomb, 118 West 69th Street, New York City. Application should be made to 
the President. 

LIBERTY 

THE BUCKLEY HOUSE (June i, 1895): 

For incipient cases. Capacity: — 75. Rates: — $2.00 per day, $10.00 to $25.00 per 
week, and $40.00 up per month. Proprietor: — A. P. Buckley. 

THEHALLIDAY COTTAGE, 76 Wedemeyer Terrace (January i, 1907): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — $1.75 per 
day and $8.00 to $15.00 per week. Proprietor: — Mrs. Kate Halliday. 

LOOMIS SANATORIUM (1896): 

Exclusively for the treatment of tuberculosis. Capacity : — 1 25 in the Sanatorium proper 
(Rates: — $15.00 to $40.00 per week); 40 in the Annex (Rates: — $5. 00 per week); 14 in the 
intermediate division (Rates : — ^$10.00 per week) ; there are 29 supported beds. Physician- 
in-Chief : — Dr. Herbert Maxon King; there are three assistants, who are also in residence at 
the Sanatorium. Application : — All inquiries of a medical nature or regarding the ad- 
mission of patients should be addressed to the Physician- in-Chief. 

THE METROPOLITAN COTTAGE, 199 Chestnut Street (1909): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 14. Rates: — $1.25 per day, $8.00 per week, and 
$34.50 per month. Proprietor: — S. Rappoport. 

SUNNYSIDE, Box 716 (July i, 1909): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — $1.50 per day and $8.00 up per 
week. Proprietor: — Mrs. L. M. Ryan. 

TOBIN COTTAGE, 116 Wedemeyer Terrace (December i, 1908): 
For convalescents from tuberculosis. Capacity: — 8. Rates: — $10.00 to $15.00 per 
week. Proprietor: — Mrs. Thomas Tobin. 

WILKINSON HOUSE (1909): 

For incipient and convalescent cases. Capacity: — 13. Rates: — $10.00 to $18.00 per 
week. Proprietor:— Miss Esther Wilkinson, R. N. 

WORKMEN'S CIRCLE'S TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (February 12, 1909): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 80. Rates: — Six months 
free treatment to the members of the Workmen's Circle (a fraternal organization). Resi- 
dent Physician: — Dr. E. Singer. Visiting Physician: — Dr. Charles Rayevsky. 

MONROE COUNTY 

MONROE COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (See lola Sanatorium, 
Rochester). 

46 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

Has been substantially authorized and a committee has been appointed to inspect sites 
and report in 1911 to the Board of Supervisors. 

MOUNT McGregor (Saratoga County) 

METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY'S SANATORIUM (191 2) 
(not yet in operation) : 

For tuberculous employees of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Capacity : — 
100. Rates: — There are no charges. Note: — This sanatorium will probably be finished 
early in 191 2. Lee K. Frankel, Ph.D., i Madison Avenue, New York City, is in charge of 
the work. 

NEWBURGH 

NEWBURGH TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (Opened July 8, 1910, with camp of 
six tents; November 28, 1910, moved into permanent building): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $1.00 per day. Medical Staff:— 
Drs. WiUiam H. Snyder, John T. Howell, Charles E. Townsend, and W. S. Gleason. Secre- 
tary : — George R. Brewster, 45 Third Street. Application should be made to the Secretary. 

NEW YORK (Boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx) 

FERRY BOAT MIDDLETOWN DAY CAMP (May, 1907) Conducted by the De- 
partment of Health: 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 126. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Superintendent : — Miss M. C. Plaukett. Medical Director : — Dr. 
B. H. Waters. 

FERRY BOAT SOUTHFIELD DAY CAMP (June i, 1908) Conducted by Bellevue 
and AUied Hospitals: 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 100; there is also a night camp for 20 cases. Rates: 
— There are no charges. Physician in Charge : — Dr. James Alexander Miller. Applica- 
tion should be made at the Tuberculosis Clinic of Bellevue Hospital. 

FERRY BOAT WESTFIELD DAY CAMP, Jackson Slip, foot of Jackson Street (JNIay 
10, 1909) Conducted by Bellevue and Allied Hospitals: 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity:— 100. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. John H. Huddleston. Application may be made 
through any tuberculosis clinic in New York City. 

THE HOME FOR INCURABLES, occupying the blocks on Third Avenue between 
i8ist and 184th Streets: 

Receives a few consumptives in single rooms. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 
13. Rates: — $10.00 per week and up, in single rooms. Medical Superintendent: — Dr, 
Israel C. Jones. Application should be made to the Medical Superintendent. 

THE HOUSE OF REST FOR CONSUMPTIVES, Bolton Road and 209th Street 

(1869): 
Chiefly for advanced cases. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — There are no charges. Su- 
perintendent: — George F. Sauer. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS INFIRMARY DIVISION 

Qanuary, 1902) Conducted by the Department of Charities: 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 800. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Charles 
B. Bacon. Resident Physician: — Dr. William A. Polglase. Application should be made 
at the Tuberculosis Hospital Admission Bureau, 426 First Avenue. 

47 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

MONTEFIORE HOME, A Hospital for Chronic Invalids and a Country Sanatorium 
for Consumptives, Broadway and 138th Street (1884): 

One ward is reserved for patients in advanced stages of consumption who are unable to 
pay for treatment. Capacity of the consumptive ward: — 44. Rates: — There are no 
charges. Superintendent: — A. Hausmann. There are four resident physicians. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Superintendent. (See Bedford Station.) 

NEW YORK COUNTY RED CROSS DAY CAMP (October i, 1908): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 75. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Superintendent: — Charles B. Grimshaw. Medical Director:- — Dr. Morris 
Class. Application should be made at the Vanderbilt Clinic, but tuberculosis cases from 
other clinics are received. 

OTISVILLE SANATORIUM OF THE NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF 
HEALTH (See Otisville, N. Y.). 

TUBERCULOSIS PREVENTORIUM FOR CHILDREN (See Farmingdale, N. J.). 

RIVERSIDE SANATORIUM FOR PULMONARY DISEASES (1903) Conducted 
by the Department of Health: 

For poor consumptives of New York City in any stage of pulmonary tuberculosis. Ca- 
pacity: — 322. Rates: — There are no charges. Resident Physician: — Dr. F. S. West- 
morland. Application for admission should be made at the Tuberculosis Hospital Admis- 
sion Bureau, 426 First Avenue. 

ST. GEORGE'S ROOF CAMP FOR TUBERCULOSIS, 208 East i6th Street (Feb- 
ruary 26, 1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases of women and children only. Capacity : — 
20 for day and night patients. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. 
N. Gilbert Seymour, 129 East 17th Street, New York City. 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES, St. Ann's Avenue and 143rd 
Street (1882): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 525. Rates: — There are 450 free beds; the 
charge in private wards is $5.00 per week; in private rooms, $io.co. Physician in Charge: 
— Dr. Henry Wollner. Application should be made to the Sister Superior. 

SEA BREEZE HOSPITAL (See New York, Borough of Brooklyn). 

SEA VIEW HOSPITAL (See New York, Borough of Richmond). 

SETON HOSPITAL, Spuyten Duyvil Parkway (189s): 

For all stages of pulmonary tuberculosis and for other forms of tuberculosis in children. 
Capacity: — In Seton proper, 200 men; in new annex at Nazareth, 175 women and children. 
Rates : — The wards of the hospital are generally kept filled with patients dependent on the 
Department of Public Charities, and the cost of their treatment is met by the city. There are 
also twenty-five or thirty private rooms for persons able to pay from $10.00 to $20.00 per week. 
Application: — Private patients should apply directly to the superintendent of the Hospital; 
by others application should be made at the Tuberculosis Hospital Admission Bureau, 426 
First Avenue, New York City. 

TUBERCULOSIS CAMP OF THE NEW YORK THROAT, NOSE AND LUNG 

HOSPITAL, 229-233 East 57th Street (1909): 
For all classes in the day camp; night camp receives only moderately advanced cases. 
Capacity: — 40 in day camp; 25 in night camp. Rates: — No charges in day camp; max- 
imum charge in night camp, $7.00 per week. Medical Director: — Dr. H. Holbrook Curtis. 
Surgeoa-in-Chief: — Dr. E. J. Birmingham. Application should be made at the Hospital. 

48 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

NEW YORK (Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens) 

BROOKLYN CENTRAL LABOR UNION TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (not 
yet in operation) : 

A site for this institution has been seciu:ed in Sujffolk County, and a considerable fund 
has been subscribed. The institution will probably be erected in 191 1. It will be open for 
all consumptives, whether members of a labor union or not. 

BROOKLYN HOME FOR CONSUMPTIVES, 240 Kingston Avenue (1881): 
For all classes of cases who are residents of Brooklyn. Capacity: — 115. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Twelve visiting physicians attend the institution. Superintendent: 
— Mrs. F. M. Perkins. Application for admission should be made at the Home, or at the 
Tuberculosis Hospital Admission Bureau, 426 First Avenue. 

TUBERCULOSIS COTTAGES OF KINGS COUNTY HOSPITAL (1909) Con- 
ducted by the Department of Charities: 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 93. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Superintendent:— Dr. John F. Fitzgerald. Application should be 
made at the Brooklyn office of the Department of Charities, or at the Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital Admission Bureau, 426 First Avenue. 

ST. ANTHONY'S HOSPITAL, Woodhaven (not yet in operation) : 

A hospital for incurables which will receive advanced cases of tuberculosis. Will 

probably be opened in 191 1 or early in 191 2. Under the direction of The Sisters of the 

Poor of St. Francis. 

ST. PETER'S HOSPITAL, Henry, Congress and Warren Streets: 
A general hospital, but five wards are reserved for consumptive patients. Capacity, 
of consumptive wards : — 1 24. Rates : — ^There are no charges. Physicians in Charge : — 
Drs. T. M. Lloyd, J. A. Kene, T. A. McGoldrick, P. F. Pyburn, C. A. Phillips, P. J. York, 
L. M. Ryan and W. G. Siegel. Application for admission should be made at the Hospital 
between the hours of 9 A. M. and 12 M. and 3 and 5 P. M., or at the Tuberculosis Hospital 
Admission Bureau, 426 First Avenue. 

SEA BREEZE HOSPITAL, 29th Street and Surf Avenue (Coney Island) (June, 

1904): 
For tuberculosis of the bones, joints, or glands in young children. Capacity: — 43. 
Rates : — $8.00 per week. Some of the patients do not pay, but there is no fixed number of 
free beds. Superintendent: — Miss Alice Page Thomson. Attending Surgeon: — Dr. 
Frederick H. Albee. Application should be made to the New York Association for Improv- 
ing the Condition of the Poor, 105 East 22nd Street, New York City. 

SUSQUEHANNA FERRY BOAT DAY CAMP (July 16, 1909): 
For persons in fair physical condition. Capacity: — 200. Rates: — There are no 
charges. Superintendent: — Lucy F. Ryder, R. N. Secretary: — James Jenkins, Jr., 69 
Schermerhorn Street. Application should be made to the Secretary, or at the Tulserculo- 
sis Hospital Admission Bureau, 426 First Avenue. 

NEW YORK (Borough of Richmond) 

SEA VIEW HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) (January, 191 2): 
Capacity: — 800. Note: — This hospital is being erected by the New York City De- 
partment of Charities at a cost of more than $2,000,000. The contract calls for completion 
• in January, 191 2. 

NIAGARA COUNTY 

NIAGARA COUNTY HOSPITAL (not yet in operation): 

Has been substantially authorized and a committee has been appointed to inspect sites 
and report in 19 11 to the Board of Supervisors. 

4 49 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

ONONDAGA COUNTY 

ONONDAGA COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 
A site has been selected at Onondaga Valley but no appropriation has been made. 

ONTARIO COUNTY 

ONTARIO COUNTY SANATORIUM (See East Bloomfield). 

OSWEGO COUNTY 

OSWEGO COUNTY HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

Has been substantially authorized and a committee has been appointed to inspect sites 
and report in 191 1 to the Board of Supervisors. 

OTISVILLE 

OTISVILLE SANATORIUM OF THE NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF 
HEALTH (July, 1906): 

For incipient and hopeful cases. Capacity: — 402. Rates: — There are no charges. 
Superintendent: — Frederick Springer. Physician in Charge: — Dr. E. S. McSweeny. 
Application should be made at Tuberculosis Hospitals Admission Bureau of the City of 
New York, 426 First Avenue, New York City. 

POUGHKEEPSIE 

POUGHKEEPSIE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM AND HOSPITAL (June 7, 
1909) : 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — 
$1.00 per day; S7.00 per week; $30.00 per month to city and county cases. To cases out of 
county, $9.00 per week. Superintendent: — Mrs. A. B. Ferguson. Application should 
be made to the Chairman of the Hospital Committee, Dr. Grace N. Kimball, 337 Mill Street. 
Note:— This hospital was estabhshed by the Board of Health, but in 1910 the Supervisors 
of Dutchess County voted $25,000 for the enlargement of the institution, and after new 
buildings are erected in 191 1, the hospital wall be a joint city and county foundation. 

RAINBOW LAKE 

INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS' RAINBOW SANATORIUM FOR 
TUBERCULOSIS (July i, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 75. Rates: — Free to 
members of the Order, male or female. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. D. Albert Rose. 

RAY BROOK 

THE MOUNTAIN VIEW SANATORIUM (March 1,1911): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity:— 20. Rates: — $3.00 per 
day; $15.00 per week and up; $50.00 per month and up. Superintendent: — Mrs. M. C. 
MacCauseland. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

RENSSELAER COUNTY 

RENSSELAER COUNTY HOSPITAL (See Lakeview Sanatorium, Troy). 

ROCHESTER 

DAY CAMP OF THE ROCHESTER PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION (July 15, 

1908): 
For ambulant cases only. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no charges. Super- 
intendent: — Dr. Montgomery E. Leary. Application should be made at the office of the 
Rochester Public Health Association. 

50 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

lOLA SANATORIUM (Monroe County Tuberculosis Hospital) (October i, 1910): 
For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — 
Maximum charge, $10.00 per week. Patients pay according to their ability. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. M. E. Leary, 397 West Avenue. Application should be made to the Super- 
intendent. 

MUNICIPAL TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (May, 1904): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity: — 72. 
Rates: — According to the ability of the patient, up to $7.00 per week. Some pay a little. 
Physician in Charge: — Dr. G. W. Goler. Superintendent: — J. W. Thompson. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Physician in Charge, at the Bureau of Health. 

ROME 

TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION OF THE ROME FEDERATION OF LABOR 
AND TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE STATE CHARITIES AID 
ASSOCIATION (not yet in operation) : 
A site for this joint pavilion has been secured and it will probably be erected in 191 1. 

SANTA CLARA 

HILL CREST AND UPLANDS (June, 1895): 

For working girls and women in incipient and moderately advanced stages of tubercu- 
losis. Capacity: — 54. Rates: — $7.00 per week. Medical Director: — Dr. Marie L. 
Chard. Application should be made to Miss E. A. Buchanan, 105 East 22nd Street, New 
York City. Note: — These two cottages are open only for summer months from June ist 
to October 15th. 

SARANAC LAKE 

ADIRONDACK COTTAGE SANITARIUM, P. O. Trudeau (1885): 
For persons who cannot afford to pay more than $7.00 per week and who are in the early 
stages of pulmonary tuberculosis, or are at least favorable types. Capacity: — no. Rates: 
— The uniform charge is $7.00 per week; there is a free bed fund, the interest of which is 
applied to prolonging the stay of needy patients. President: — Dr. Edward L. Trudeau. 
Resident Physicians : — Drs. Lawrason Brown, F. H. Heise, and A. T. Laird, Pathologist. 
Application should be made to any of the following physicians: Dr. Lawrason Brown, Sara- 
nac Lake; Dr. James Alexander Miller, New York City; Dr. Linsly R. Williams, New York 
City. 

COLLINS COTTAGE, 96 Park Avenue: 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 5. Rates: — $25.00 to $45.00 per week. Pro- 
prietor: — Miss Ruth Collins. Application should be made to the Proprietor. 

EVERGREEN LODGE (1906): 

For incipient and ciu-able cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — $2.50 per day; $17.00 to 
$35.00 per week. Proprietors: — The Misses Mahan. Patients may have choice of seven 
visiting physicians residing in Saranac Lake. Application should be made to the Proprietors. 

HILLCREST COTTAGE, 5 Shepard Avenue: 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 11. Rates: — $12.00 to $20.00 per week. Pro- 
prietor: — Mrs. E. H. Jones. Application should be made to the Proprietor. 

MARQUIS COTTAGE, 42 Baker Street: 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 8. Rates: — $25.00 to $40.00 per week. Pro- 
prietor: — Mrs. M. A. Marquis. Application should be made to the Proprietor. 

NEAL COTTAGE, 36 Franklin Avenue: 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 7. Rates: — $13.00 to $25.00 per week. Pro- 
prietors : — The Misses Neal. Application should be made to the Proprietors. 

SI 



SANATORIA NEW YORK 

THE RECEPTION HOSPITAL FOR PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS (1903): 
First — To provide temporary care for tuberculous patients who reside in Saranac Lake 
and vicinity, and who require nursing. Second — To provide nursing and a short period of 
treatment for patients who come with the expectation of admission to the Adirondack Cottage 
Sanitarium, but are refused because of acute or advanced disease. Capacity : — 18. Rates : 
— S7.00 per week, including board, rooms, medical care, and nursing. Two weeks' board 
payable in advance. Medical Director :— Dr. Edward R. Baldwin. Superintendent: — 
Miss Sophie M. Hoerner. Visiting Physicians: — Drs. Charles C. Trembly, Hugh M. 
Kinghorn, Lawrason Brown, and J. Woods Price. Application: — Patients are received only 
when at Saranac Lake and by applying to Dr. Baldwin or one of the Visiting Physicians. A 
waiting list precludes the admission of patients directly from out of town. 

THE RUMEN APP COTTAGE (July, 1902): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 14 in winter; 22 in summer. Rates: — $2.00 per 

day, $12.00 per week. Application should be made to Miss Edith Rumenapp, Moody 
Pond Road. 

ST. MARY'S OF THE LAKE (June, 1910): 

For advanced cases only. Capacity: — 16. Rates: — From $5.00 to $25.00 per week; 
limited number of free patients. Supervisor : — Sister Mary Catherine, 94 Ampersand Ave- 
nue, Saranac Lake. Application should be made to the Supervisor. 

SARATOGA COUNTY 

SARATOGA COUNTY HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

Has been substantially authorized and a committee has been appointed to inspect sites 
and report in 191 1 to the Board of Supervisors. 

SCHENECTADY 

SCHENECTADY COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (July i, 1908, as Red 
Cross Day Camp; as county hospital, 1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are 
no fixed charges. Patients pay according to their ability. Superintendent: — Miss Sarah 
Palmer. Medical Director: — Dr. P. McPartlon. Application should be made at the 
Municipal Tuberculosis Dispensary. Note : — The County in 1909 took over and enlarged 
the Red Cross Day Camp as a temporary hospital, and in 1910 it was decided to erect a 
permanent hospital at a cost of $35,000, which was appropriated by the county. 

STEUBEN COUNTY 

STEUBEN COUNTY HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

Has been substantially authorized and a committee has been appointed to inspect sites 
and report in 191 1 to the Board of Supervisors. 

SYRACUSE 

SYRACUSE HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN, TUBERCULOSIS 
WARD (1909): 

All forms of tuberculosis received, except pulmonary tuberculosis in children. Capacity 
for tuberculous patients: — 20. Rates: — $1.00 to $4.00 per day. Superintendent: — 
Miss Laura A. Slee. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

TROY 

LAKEVIEW SANATORIUM (August 9, 1910): 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 52. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Superintendent: — S. E. Cordial. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. 
W. Carey, 87 Fourth Street, Troy, N. Y. Application should be made to the local Com- 
missioner of Charities. Note : — This sanatorium is connected with the Rensselaer County 
Hospital. 

52 



SANATORIA NEW YORK, NORTH CAROLINA 

TUPPER LAKE 

TUPPER LAKE SANATORIUM (October, igio): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity : — 20. Rates : — $25.00 to $40.00 per week. Super- 
intendent: — Dr. Charles Ryttenberg. Application should be made to the Superintendent, 
or to Examining Physicians in New York City. 

ULSTER COUNTY 

ULSTER COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (See Kingston). 

UTICA 

CAMP HEALTHMORE (June, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — There are 
no fixed charges. Chairman : — Dr. Florence I. Staunton, 14 Cottage Place. 

WARREN COUNTY 

WARREN COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 
A site has been selected but no appropriation has been made. 

WEST HAVERSTRAW 

NEW YORK STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE CARE OF CRIPPLED AND DE- 
FORMED CHILDREN (1900, began treatment of tuberculous cases): 

Receives children with tuberculosis of bones and joints in special wards and pavilions. 
Capacity for tuberculous children: — 36. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent : — Dr. Newton M. Shaffer. Resident Physician : — Dr. O. Howard Cobb. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Superintendent. Only indigent cases who are residents of 
New York State are admitted. 

WOODHAVEN 

ST. ANTHONY'S HOSPITAL (See New York, Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens). 

YONKERS 

MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES (not yet in operation) : 

An appropriation of $50,000 was made in 19 10 by the city of Yonkers for a tuberculosis 
hospital, and a committee is considering sites. 

SPRAIN RIDGE HOSPITAL (April 6, 1908) : 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $5.00 per week. Superintend- 
ent: — Mrs. Helen Smith. Attending Physician: — Dr. William J. Vogeler, 177 Pahsade 
Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Application should be made to the Attending Physician. Only 
residents of Yonkers are admitted. 



NORTH CAROLINA 

MONTROSE 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (Novem- 
ber 6, 1908): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — $10.00 per week. Superintend- 
ent: — Dr. J. E. Brooks. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

53 



SANATORIA NORTH CAROLINA 

ASHEVILLE 

Eight cottages are conducted by their proprietors for the exclusive use of patients under 
the treatment of Dr. Charles L. Minor. No one can be admitted to any of these cottages 
without consulting Dr. Minor, and all applications for admission should be addressed to him. 
All classes of cases are received and are referred to different cottages according to their 
condition. 

Two cottages are conducted also in a similar manner for Dr. William L. Dunn, and no 
one can be admitted to them without consulting Dr. Dunn. 

ST. JOSEPH'S SANATORIUM (1910): 

Capacity: — 20. Superintendent: — Sister Scholastica. 

THEWINYAH SANATORIUM (October, 1888): 

For diseases of the lungs and tliroat; advanced or hopelessly exhausted cases of consump- 
tion are not admitted. Capacity: — 80. Rates: — $30.00 per week and upward. Medical 
Director: — Dr. Silvio von Ruck. Consultant: — Dr. Karl von Ruck. Application should 
be addressed to the Winyah Sanatorium. (See advertisement, p. vi.) 

BILTMORE 

ASHEVILLE-BILTMORE SANATORIUM (January, 1908): 

For early cases only. Capacity: — 35. Rates: — $8.00 to $25.00 per week; $60.00 to 
$100.00 per month; medical services are extra. Proprietor: — Miss Amelia Pulliam. 
Medical Director: — Dr. Paul Paquin. Application should be made to the Proprietor. 

BLACK MOUNTAIN 

CRAGMONT SANATORIUM (1906): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $20.00 to $35.00 per week. Med- 
ical Director and Superintendent: — Dr. I. J. Archer. Application should be made to 
the Medical Director upon advice of family physician. 

FELLOWSHIP SANATORIUM OF THE ROYAL LEAGUE (August 23, 1905): 
For members of the Royal League in all stages of tuberculosis. Capacity : — 25. Rates : — ■ 
$1.00 per day to those who can pay; an arrangement may be perfected with the local lodge, 
so that cases may be received, though unable to pay. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. I. 
J. Archer. Applicants are admitted through the officials of their local council. 

THE PINES SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (1901): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 15. Rates: — $20.00 to 

$30.00 per week, including nursing and medical attention. Superintendent: — Dr. Clyde E. 

Cotton. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

FLAT ROCK 

HEIDELBERG SANATORIUM (January i, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $25.00 per 
week. Medical Director: — Dr. Arthur R. Guerard. Application should be made to the 
Medical Director. 

HENDERSONVILLE 

DR. MORSE'S SANATORIUM (July i, 1908): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — ^$20.00 to 
$35.00 per week. Superintendent and Resident Physician: — Dr. Lucius B. Morse. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

THE TUDOR AND CARSON COTTAGES (January, 1910): 

All classes received; different classes are placed in different cottages. Capacity: — 30. 
Rates: — $7.00 to $10.00 per week. Medical Director: — Dr. Wm. Redin Kirk. Applica- 

54 



SANATORIA NORTH DAKOTA, OHIO 

tion should be made to the Medical Director. Note: — Dr. Kirk conducts 12 cottages for 
tuberculous patients. 

HIGHLANDS 

HIGHLANDS CAMP SANATORIUM (July, 1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $20.00 per 
week. Medical Director: — Dr. Mary E. Lapham. Application should be made to the 
Medical Director. 

SOUTHERN PINES 

SOUTHERN PINES SANITARIUM (1898): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $15.00 per week and upward. 
Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Edwin Gladmon. Application should be made to the 
Medical Superintendent. (See advertisement, p. vi.) 



NORTH DAKOTA 



STATE SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) : 

A commission was appointed in accordance with an act of the Legislature of 1909 and 
$10,000 was appropriated for a site of a state sanatorium for tuberculosis and the improvement 
thereof. A site has been selected at Dunseith, and an appropriation of $37,500 for build- 
ings was made by the Legislature in 191 1. 

OHIO 

MOUNT VERNON 

OHIO STATE SANATORIUM (December i, 1909): 

For incipient pulmonary tuberculosis only. Ultimate Capacity: — 200. Rates: — 
$5.00 per week; cases up to two per cent, of the available capacity may be admitted for a 
sum less than •$5.00, as determined by the Board of Trustees. Superintendent: — Dr. 
Clayton B. Con well. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 



AICRON 

DISTRICT TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL OF STARK, SUT,1MIT, PORTAGE, 
COLUMBIANA AND MAHONING COUNTIES (not yet in operation) : 

In 1910 the five counties above mentioned agreed to build a joint hospital at Springfield 
Lake about three miles from Akron in Summit County. The hospital will cost about $100,000 
and will accommodate about 80 patients. The buildings will probably be erected in 191 1. 

CINCINNATI 

BRANCH HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES (July, 1897) : 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 300. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Superintendent: — Dr. Charles S. Rockhill. Application should be made at the Cincinnati 
Hospital. 

DAY CAMP OF THE CINCINNATI ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (July 11, 

1910): 
For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases* Capacity: — 80. Rates: — 

55 



SANATORIA OHIO 

There are no charges. Superintendent: — S. P. Withrow. Medical Director: — Dr. 
Charles S. Rockhill. Application should be made at the Tuberculosis Dispensary. 

CLEVELAND 

MUNICIPAL SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS OF THE CITY OF 

CLEVELAND (See Warrensville). 

MUNICIPAL TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) : 

At a general election in July, 1910, a bond issue of $250,000 for a Tuberculosis Sanatorium 
to be erected at Warrensville was authorized. Work on plans was begun at once, and the 
hospital will be ready early in 191 2. The hospital will accommodate 150 advanced and 80 
incipient cases, and 100 more beds will be added later. The work is being done under the 
supervision of F. C. Hogan, Director of Pubhc Safety. 

TENT COLONY OF THE CHILDREN'S FRESH AIR CAMP, Buckeye Road 

(May, 1908): 
For aU classes. Capacity: — 30 children. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Superintendent: — Dr. R. H. Bishop, Jr. 

TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM OF THE CLEVELAND CITY HOSPITAL 

(October, 1900): 
For moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 100. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. J. D. McAfee. Resident Physician: — Dr. J. C. 
Fox. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

COLUMBUS 

FRANKLIN COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (two pavilions opened Jan- 
uary 8, 1909; $80,000 Hospital for all classes of cases, in process of construction, 
will probably be opened in June, 191 1): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 32; Complete institution will accommodate 120. 
Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — O. K. Ellis. Chief Nurse: — Miss M. 
H. Pierson. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

DAYTON 

DISTRICT TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL OF MONTGOMERY AND PREBLE 
COUNTIES (March i, 1909): 

For all classes of pulmonary cases. Capacity : — 24. Rates : — $7.00 to $10.00 per week. 
Matron: — Mrs. Mattie E. Ahlborn. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Edward B. Markey, 
1 1 21 North Main Street, Dayton, Ohio. Application should be made to the Matron, who 
refers all cases to the proper Medical Examiner. 

THE MIAMI VALLEY HOSPITAL (1903) : 

Receives consumptives in all stages of the disease. Capacity for tuberculous pa- 
tients: — 6. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Miss Florence A. Bishop. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

NATIONAL MILITARY HOME, TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT (1904): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity of Tuberculosis Department: — 30. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. F. W. Roush. Application should be made 
to the Superintendent. Only volunteer soldiers who have served in war are admitted. 

DEFIANCE COUNTY 

DEFIANCE COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

The County Commissioners have decided to erect a county hospital near Defiance. It 
will probably be opened in 19 11 or early in 191 2. 

56 



SANATORIA OHIO 

JEFFERSON COUNTY 

JEFFERSON COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 
The County Commissioners have decided to erect a county hospital near Steubenville. 

It will probably be opened in 1911 or early in 191 2. 

LIMA 

DISTRICT TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL OF ALLEN, AUGLAIZE, SHELBY, 
MERCER AND VAN WERT COUNTIES (April i, 191 1): 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 28. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Superintendent and Medical Director: — Dr. J. W. Costolo. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

LORAIN COUNTY 

LORAIN COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

Plans have been approved for a tuberculosis hospital to be erected near Elyria in 191 1. 

LUCAS COUNTY 

LUCAS COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (See Toledo). 

SPRINGFIELD 

DISTRICT TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL OF CLARKE, MADISON, AND 
CHAMPAIGN COUNTIES (October 20, 1910) : 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — 
There are no fixed charges. Superintendent : — Dr. Henry Baldwin. Application should 
be made to the Superintendent. 

KLEEMAN MEMORIAL TUBERCULOSIS CAMP (June i, 1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 16. Rates: — There are no 

charges. Superintendent: — Miss Anna Lohrer. Resident Physician: — Dr. I. E. 

Seward, 310 West Main Street, Springfield, Ohio. 

TOLEDO 

LUCAS COUNTY INFIRMARY, TUBERCULOSIS PORCHES (1909): 
For advanced cases only. Capacity: — 16. Rates: — There are no charges. Physician 
in Charge of Tuberculous Department : — Dr. Abraham J. Hammer. Superintendent : — 

John S. Hofner. 

LUCAS COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (191 1) (not yet in operation) : 

A county hospital accommodating 60 patients will be erected near Toledo at a cost of 
$40,000 in 191 1. 

THALIAN FRESH AIR CAMP (May i, 1910) : 

For women in incipient and moderately advanced stages of tuberculosis. No advanced 
cases taken. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Miss 
Clara Anth. Medical Director: — Dr. Ralph P. Daniells. Application should be made at 
the Thalian Dispensary. 

TROY 

DISTRICT HOSPITAL OF MIAMI AND DRAKE COUNTIES (not yet in oper- 
ation) : 

In December, 1910, Dr. Warren Coleman of Troy and Hon. J. M. Bickle of Greenville 
were chosen as commissioners to erect a joint county hospital for Miami and Drake Coxmties 
on a site selected at Troy, Ohio. The building will probably be erected in 191 1. 

57 



SANATORIA OKLAHOMA, OREGON 

WARRENSVILLE 

MUNICIPAL SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS OF THE CITY OF CLEVE- 
LAND (1906): 

For cases of tuberculosis in first and second stages of the disease. Capacity: — 80. 
Rates : — Practically all beds are free. A few patients pay a nominal charge. Superintend- 
ent: — Dr. E. R. Brooks. Application should be made at the Anti-Tuberculosis League 
or Health Department Dispensaries in Cleveland. 

YOUNGSTOWN 

MAHONING COUNTY INFIRMARY, TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (1908): 
For male tuberculous inmates of the Infirmary. Capacity: — 14. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Superintendent: — R. S. Taylor. 



OKLAHOMA 



OKLAHOMA CITY 

OKLAHOMA CITY DETENTION HOSPITAL (February i, 1910): 

Receives all classes of cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Rates: — 

There are no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. John W. Riley. Application should be 

made to the Medical Director. 



OREGON 

SALEM 

OREGON STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (September i, 1910): 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — 

There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. P. H. Fitz Gerald. Application may be 

made through any examining physician to the Superintendent. 



CHEMAWA 

SALEM INDIAN SCHOOL SANATORIUM (1909): 

For tuberculous Indians. Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 25. Superintend- 
ent: — E. L. Chalcraft. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. 
Clarence D. Fulkerson. Note : — Conducted by the Office of Indian Affairs. 

PORTLAND (Milwaukee Heights) 

THE PORTLAND OPEN AIR SANATORIUM FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

PULMONAR.Y DISEASES (1905): 
Preferably for incipient cases, but moderately advanced cases are also received. Ca- 
pacity: — 40. Rates: — $15.00 to $35.00 per week. Superintendent: — Dr. Marion H. 
Ober. Medical Director: — Dr. E. A. Pierce. Application should be made to the Medical 
Director, 1008 Corbett Building. 

TUBERCULOSIS PAVILIONS OF MULTNOMAH COUNTY POOR FARM 

(1908): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity of Tuberculosis Department: — 24. Rates: — There 

58 



SANATORIA PENNSYLVANIA 

are no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. Edward P. Geary, County Physician. Applica- 
tion should be made to the County Physician, Oregonian Building. Note : — New buildings 
will be erected in 191 1 at the new poor farm. 



PENNSYLVANIA 



MONT ALTO (Franklin County) 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE SOUTH MOUNTAIN SANATORIUM (1907): 
For indigent citizens of Pennsylvania suffering with pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity: 
— 850. Rates: — There are no charges except for laundry. Medical Director:— Dr. Fred 
C. Johnson. Deputy Medical Director: — Dr. B. Swayne Putts. Application should be 
made at the State tuberculosis dispensary in the district where the patient resides. 

CRESSON (Cambria County) 

STATE SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (not yet in operation): 

Begun in 1910. Erected by State Department of Health, under appropriation of Legis- 
lature of 1909. Cost to be about $250,000. Capacity: — 250. Will receive consumptives 
in all stages of the disease. This sanatorium is designed to accommodate patients chiefly 
from the western part of the state. Commissioner of Health: — Dr. Samuel G. Dixon. 

HAMBURG (Berks County) 

STATE SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (not yet in operation): 

Site piurchased in 1910. Sanatorium will be erected by State Department of Health 
and will accommodate 250. It will receive consumptives in all stages and is designed to 
accommodate patients chiefly from the eastern part of the state. Commissioner of Health : 
— Dr. Samuel G. Dixon. 



BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT 

THE BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAIN SANATORIUM (1905): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases of pulmonary and surgical tuberculosis. 
Capacity: — 30 in winter and 35 in summer. Rates: — $12.00 to $25.00 per week. Super- 
intendent: — Florence M. Gottshall. Resident Physician and Medical Director: — Dr. 
A. Barr Snively. Application should be made to the Medical Director. (See advertise- 
ment, p. ix.) 

BRADFORD 

BON AIR SANATORIUM (May i, 1908): 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 36. Rates: — 
$5.00 per week. Superintendent and Medical Director: — Dr. O. F. Kunkel. Manager: 
— M. F. Melvin. Application should be made to the Manager. 

EAGLEVILLE (Montgomery County) 

PHILADELPHIA JEWISH SANATORIUM FOR CONSUMPTIVES (September 
4, 1909) : 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — ^40. Rates: — There are no 
charges. Superintendent: — C. S. Butts. Medical Director: — Dr. A. J. Cohen, 723 Pine 
Street, Philadelphia. Application should be made to the Medical Director. 

59 



SANATORIA PENNSYLVANIA 

LITITZ 

LITITZ SPRINGS SANATORIUM (1904): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 32. Rates: — $2.00 per day; $10.00 per week; 
$35.00 per month. Superintendent and Resident Physician: — Dr. James C. Brobst.. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

MARSHALSEA (Boyce P. O.) 

PITTSBURG CITY HOME AND HOSPITAL (1906): 

Receives all classes of tuberculous patients, but particularly for advanced cases. Ca- 
pacity for tuberculous patients: — 125. Rates: — $3.00 to $5.00 per week, but most of the 
patients are admitted without charge as indigents. Superintendent: — M. F. Larkin. 
Director of Department of Charities: — Dr. E. R. Walters. Application should be made 
to the Department of Charities, 511 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

MONT ALTO 

FORNEY SANATORIUM (September 25, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — $15.00 per 

week. Superintendent and Medical Director : — Dr. William S. Ash. Application should 
be made to the Superintendent. 

MORTON (Delaware County) 

THE DERMADY COTTAGE SANATORIUM (1903): 

Exclusively for pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $15.00 to $35.00 
per week. Superintendent: — Miss Margaret G. O'Hara. Application should be made 
to the Superintendent. 

OIL CITY 

GRAND VIEW SANATORIUM FOR THE CARE AND TREATMENT OF POOR 
CONSUMPTIVES (December, 1904): 

For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — 
Some beds are free. Superintendent :—M. J. Elizabeth Carpenter. Application should 
be made to the Superintendent. 

PHILADELPHLA. 

THE HOME FOR CONSUMPTIVES OF THE PHILADELPHIA PROTESTANT 
EPISCOPAL CITY MISSION, Chestnut Hill (1876): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 80. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent:— Rev. Herman L. Duhring, D.D. Resident Physician: — Dr. Charles M. 
Montgomery. Application : — Blank forms of apphcation are issued by the central office 
of the Protestant Episcopal City Mission, 225 South 3rd Street, Philadelphia. 

HOSPITAL OF THE HENRY PHIPPS INSTITUTE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 

PENNSYLVANIA, Corner 7th and Lombard Streets (1903): 
For incipient and advanced cases. Capacity: — 24. Rates: — There are no charges. 
Clinical Director: — Dr. H. R. M. Landis. Director of Laboratory:— Dr. Paul A. Lewis. 
Sociological and Executive Director:— Alexander M. Wilson. Application should be 
made at the Institute. Note: — A new building with open air roof will be erected in 191 1. 

LUCIEN MOSS HOME, Jewish Hospital, York Pike and Tabor Road (June, 1900) : 
For poor consumptives of Jewish faith, in any stage of the disease. Capacity: — 40. 

Rates: — There are no charges. Chief Resident Physician: — Dr. Edwin A. Jarecki. 

Application should be made to the Chief Resident Physician. 

PHILADELPHIA GENERAL HOSPITAL, 34th and Pine Streets (1898) : 
For the poor of the city; consumptives are segregated in special buildings. Capacity 
of the tuberculosis buildings : — 430. Rates : — There are no charges. Chief Resident 

60 



SANATORIA PENNSYLVANIA 

Physician: — Dr. Henry Sykes. Application should be made to the Chief Resident Phy- 
sician. 

RUSH HOSPITAL, Lancaster Avenue and Thirty-third Street (1892): 
Exclusively for the treatment of pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis; patients in all 
stages are received. Capacity: — City Hospital, 50, including 9 private rooms; Country 
Branch, 40. Rates: — $7.00 per week in the wards; $10.00 to $20.00 in private rooms. 
Visiting Physicians: — Drs. S. Solis Cohen, T. Mellor Tyson, and John D. McLean; there 
is no resident physician. Superintendent :— Miss Elizabeth Brophy. Application should 
be made to the Superintendent. 

PITTSBURG 

PITTSBURG MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

In 1910 a bond issue of $250,000 for a municipal tuberculosis hospital was approved. 

A site will be selected and work started probably in 191 1. The work wiU be carried on imder 

the direction of the Municipal Tuberculosis Commission. 

PITTSBURG CITY HOME AND HOSPITAL (See Marshalsea). 

THE TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE HOSPITAL OF PITTSBURG, Corner Bedford 
Avenue and Wandless Street (February, 1907) : 

For incipient and advanced cases. Capacity: — 80. Rates: — $1.00 to $1.50 per day; 
$7.00 to $10.00 per week. From 35 to 40 free beds are maintained. Conducts a night camp, 
an open air school at the hospital, a farm at Allison Park, Pa., a post-graduate course for 
nurses, and chnics for medical students. Medical Director: — Dr. WilUam Charles White. 
Resident Physician: — Dr. K. H. Van Norman. Superintendent: — Miss Alice E. Stew- 
art. Application should be made at the hospital or at the dispensary in connection with 
the Hospital. 

READING 

MOUNT ST. MICHAEL'S SANATORIUM (October 21, 1910): 
For Sisters of any Roman Catholic rehgious community in Pennsylvania in any stage of 
tuberculosis. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no charges. Visiting Physician: — 
Dr. A. M. Rothrock. Director:— Rev. Mgr. George Borneman. Application should 
be made to the Director. 

NEVERSINK MOUNTAIN TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (May 9, 1910): 
For incipient, moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — 

There are no charges. Superintendent and Medical Director: — Dr. A. M. Rothrock. 

Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

SCRANTON 

WEST MOUNTAIN SANATORIUM (August, 1903): 

For poor consumptives resident in Scranton; all stages are received. Capacity: — 24. 
Rates : — There is a maximum charge of $5.00 per week for Scranton patients who are able 
to pay; patients from outside the city are charged $7.00 per week. Scranton patients who 
are unable to pay are admitted free. There is no physician in residence, but there is an attend- 
ing staff of six. Medical Director: — Dr. J. M. Wainwright, 436 Wyoming Avenue, Scran- 
ton, Pa. Application should be made to the Medical Director. 

WHITE HAVEN 

CLAIR MONT SANATORIUM, P. O. Box 97 (August i, 1910) : 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity : — 10. Rates : — $10.00, $12.00, 
and $15.00 per week. Managers and Nurses in Charge: — Miss Agnes M. Heibel and 
Miss Carrie V. Ames. Applications should be addressed to the Sanatoriimi. 

FERN CLIFF SANATORIUM (1904): 

For moderately advanced cases only. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $12.00 to $15.00 per 

61 



SANATORIA PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, PORTO RICO 

week. Superintendent: — IMiss Margaret McDonald. Application should be made to 
the Superintendent. (See advertisement, p. viii.) 

SUNNYREST SANATORIUM (November, igoi) : 

For pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $20.00 to S30.00 per week. 
Superintendent: — Ehvell Stockdale. Visiting Physicians: — Dr. A. M. Shoemaker and 
Walter F. ^Vood. Application should be made to the Superintendent. (See advertise- 
ment, p. viii.) 

WHITEHAVEN SANATORIUM (1901): 

For all cases of tuberculosis who are not financially able to provide treatment for them- 
selves. Capacity: — 216. Rates: — S7.00 to $10.00 per week. Superintendent: — Dr. 
Ale.xander Armstrong. President of the Board of Managers: — Dr. Lawrence F. Flick. 
Secretary: — Miss Helen C. McDevitt, 204 South 7th Street, Philadelphia. Application 
should be made to the Secretary, to the Superintendent, or to any Official Examining Physician. 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

BAGUIO (Benguet Province) 

BAGUIO TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM OF THE BUREAU OF HEALTH 
(March i, 1910): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Director: — Dr. Victor G. Heiser. Resident Physician: — Dr. F. W. Vincent. Applica- 
tion should be made to the Bureau of Health. 

MANILA 

SAN JUAN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS CAMP OF THE BUREAU OF HEALTH 

(September 27, 1910): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 130. Rates: — Free for 
indigents; for others, $7.50 per month; for separate room accommodations, $25.00 per month. 
Medical Director: — Dr. Victor G. Heiser. Resident Physicians: — Dr. W. E. Musgrave 
and Dr. Arturo Garcia. Application should be made to the Bureau of Health. 

SAN JUAN DE BIOS CITY HOSPITAL Qanuary i, 1911): 

For advanced cases. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Rates: — There are 
no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. Victor G. Heiser. Application should be made to 
the Bureau of Health. 



PORTO RICO 



SAN JUAN (Santurce) 

OPEN-AIR SANATORIUM OF THE PORTO RICO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS 
LEAGUE (April i, 1907): 

For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 55. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Director: — Dr. Pedro Gutierrez Igaravidez. Superintendent: — Miss Marie Louise 
Craven. Application should be made to the Medical Director. 



62 



SANATORIA RHODE ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA 

RHODE ISLAND 

WALLUM LAKE 

RHODE ISLAND STATE SANATORIUM (1905): 

For incipient and early cases of tuberculosis. Capacity: — 130. Rates: — $5.00 per 
week. Trustees may admit patients free of charge. Superintendent: — Dr. Harry Lee 
Barnes. Application should be made to the Superintendent. Only residents of Rhode 
Island are admitted. 



EAST GREENWICH 

CRAWFORD ALLEN MEMORIAL BRANCH, RHODE ISLAND HOSPITAL 

(May, 1907): 
For tuberculosis of the bones and joints in children. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. John M. Peters. Application should be 
made to the Superintendent at the Rhode Island Hospital, Providence. The branch hos- 
pital is open only in the summer months. 

HILL'S GROVE 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL ANNEX (1905): 

For incurable cases chiefly. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — $7.00 per week. Most patients 
are admitted free. Superintendent : — Sister Mary Eulalia. Application should be made 
to the Superintendent, St. Joseph's Hospital, Providence. 

HOWARD 

STATE ALMSHOUSE, TUBERCULOSIS WARDS (1897): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 44. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. Fred B. Jewett. 

PROVIDENCE 

CITY HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS WARD (1910) : 

For advanced cases. Capacity: — 35. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. D. L. Richardson. Application should be made at the hospital. 

DAY CAMP OF THE PROVIDENCE LEAGUE FOR THE SUPPRESSION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS (May, 1908): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no charges. Carfare 
and heavy wraps furnished to the very poor. Application should be made at the office of 
the League for the Suppression of Tuberculosis, 55 Eddy Street, Providence, R. I., or at the 
Out-Patient Department of the Rhode Island Hospital. 

ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL (See Hill's Grove). 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

AIELEN 

THE AIKEN COTTAGES (October, 1896): 

For men in reduced circumstances with incipient pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity : — 
16. Rates: — $5.00 per week; there are four free beds. Application shoidd be made to 
Dr. H. T. Hall, Aiken, S. C, or to Dr. E. S. Cross, Aiken, S. C. 

63 



SANATORIA SOUTH DAKOTA, TENNESSEE 

SOUTH DAKOTA 



CUSTER 

SOUTH DAKOTA STATE SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (March i, 
1911): 

For curable cases only. Capacity: — 14. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent and Medical Director: — Dr. H. J. James. Application should be made to the 
Superintendent. 



HOT SPRINGS 

TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT OF THE BATTLE MOUNTAIN SANATO- 
RIUM, NATIONAL HOME FOR VOLUNTEER SOLDIERS (November i, 
1909) : 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no charges. Governor 
and Surgeon: — Col. James E. Miller. Application should be made to the Governor and 
Surgeon. Only volunteer soldiers who have served in some war of the United States are 
admitted. 



TENNESSEE 



CHATTANOOGA 

CHATTANOOGA TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (1911) (not yet in operation) : 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 36. Rates: — Not yet 
fixed. Chairman, Building Committee : — E. Y. Chapin, 815 Chestnut Street, Chattanooga, 
Term. 

MEMPHIS 

MEMPHIS TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (July i, 1908) : 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 16. Rates: — There are no charges. Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. M. Goltman. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

NASHVILLE 
CITY AND COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 
In 1910, an appropriation of $10,000 was made for a city and county tuberculosis hospital. 
A site has been selected and the institution wiU be erected in 191 1. 

NATIONAL SOLDIERS' HOME 

NATIONAL HOME FOR DISABLED VOLUNTEER SOLDIERS, MOUNTAIN 

BRANCH (1905): 
For all tuberculous soldiers who have served in any war for United States, and who have 
received an honorable discharge. Capacity: — 85. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Superintendent: — Major James C. Butler. Note: — It is planned to transfer tuberculous 
members of the Homes in the Central and Eastern parts of the country to the Mountain 
Branch for treatment. 

64 



SANATORIA TEXAS 

NEWPORT (From May i to November i) ; OKAHUMPKA, FLA. (From 
November i to May i) 

GRANDVIEW SANATORIUM (1887): 

Receives all cases that offer any hope of recovery. Capacity of Newport Sanato- 
rium: — 4s; of Okahiunpka Sanatorium: — 30. Rates: — $3.00 to $4.00 per day; $21.00 to 
$28.00 per week; $90.00 to $120.00 per month. Superintendent: — Dr. J. M. Masters. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

ROGERSVILLE (R. F. D. No. 9) 

PRINTING PRESSMEN AND ASSISTANTS' UNION OF NORTH AMERICA'S 
SANATORIUM (June, 191 1) (not yet in operation): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no charges. President: 
— George A. Berry, LjtIc Theatre Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. Application should be made 
to the President. Only members of the Union are admitted. 

TEXAS 



STATE SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) 

In March, 191 1, the Legislature appropriated $100,000 for the erection of two tubercu- 
losis colonies with a minimum capacity of 60 patients each, and $40,000 for maintenance. 
The sanatoria will be erected by a commission of which the State Health Officer, Dr. Ralph 
Steiner, Austin, is chairman. They will probably be opened in 191 1. 



EL PASO 

THE HOMAN SANATORIUM, Succeeding the Albert Baldwin Sanatorium (1908) : 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 45. Rates: — $25.00 to 

$40.00 per week including all medical and nursing attention. Superintendent: — Dr. 

Robert B. Homan. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

SISTERS' HOSPITAL, HOTEL DIEU (1894) : 

A general hospital; consumptives cared for in separate wing. Capacity for tuberculous 
patients: — 50. Superintendent: — Sister Catherine. Application should be made to the 
Superintendent. 

LLANO 

TEXAS SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS (1903): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $25.00 per 
week; $100.00 per month. Medical Director: — Dr. C. W. Coutant. Secretary: Dr. M. 
M. Smith, 415 Wilson Building, Dallas. Application should be made to the Secretary. 

SAN ANGELO 

SAN ANGELO HEIGHTS SANATORIUM (1906): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — $80.00 to $100.00 per month. 
Medical Superintendent: — Dr. F. B. Magruder. Application should be made to the 
Superintendent. 

THE SUNNYCREST BUNGALOWS, Box 267 (August 3,. 1908): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases only. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — $70.00 
per month and upwards. Medical DJyfCtor: — Dr. James D. Brooks, 

5 65 



SANATORIA VERJMONT, VIRGINIA 

SAN ANTONIO 

SAN ANTONIO TENT COLONY (1906): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity : — 40. Rates : — $20.00 to $50.00 per week. Super- 
intendent: — Dr. W. C. Farmer. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 



VERMONT 



BRATTLEBORO 

BRATTLEBORO TUBERCULOSIS DAY CAMP (April i, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 10. Rates: — $1.00 per 

day; $7.00 per week; most of those treated are charity patients. Superintendent: — Miss 

Mary E. Schumacher. 

PITTSFORD 

VERMONT SANATORIUM (December 16, 1907): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity: — 40. Rates: 
— Si.oo per day; $7.00 per week; $7.50 including board, laundry and supplies. Superin- 
tendent and Medical Director: — Dr. Walter C. Klotz. Application should be made to 
the Superintendent. Except under special conditions, patients must be residents of Vermont. 



VIRGINIA 



CATAWBA (Roanoke County) 

CATAWBA SANATORIUM (Virginia State Sanatorium) (July 15, 1909): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — no. Rates: — $5.00 per week. Business 
Manager: — A. Lambert Martin. Resident Physician: — Dr. W. E. Jennings. Applica- 
tion should be made to the Resident Physician. 



CATAWBA 

THE HOME COTTAGE (February, 1910): 

For incipient cases. Capacity: — 14. Rates:— Si 2.00 per week. Manager: — Mrs. 
Leslie G. Bamett. Visiting Physician : — Dr. W. E. Jennings. 

CHARLOTTESVILLE 

CHARLOTTESVILLE TUBERCULOSIS CAMP (1907): 

For moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — ^There are 
no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. R. W. Garnett. Application should be made to the 
Medical Director. 

NORFOLK 

SUMMER CAMP OF THE NORFOLK ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE Qune, 

1910): 
For children from families in which there is tuberculosis. Capacity: — 12. Rates: — 
There are no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. Charles R. Grandy. Applicants are ad- 
mitted through the Tuberculosis Clinic of the Anti-Tuberculosis League. 

66 



SANATORIA WASHINGTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION AT CITY HOME (1909): 

For advanced cases. Capacity: — 30; for white and colored. Rates: — There are no 
charges. Superintendent: — J. E. Parr. 

PETERSBURG 

BIRDVILLE SANATORIUM (January i, 191 1): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Director: — Dr. William F. Drewry. Secretary: — Mrs. G. Cleveland Wright. Applica- 
tion should be made to the Secretary. 

RICHMOND (Brook HiU) 

PINE CAMP (November 30, 1910) : 

For moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity : — 20. Rates : — There are no 
charges. Superintendent: — Dr. Giles B. Cook, 300 West Grace Street. Application 
should be made to the Superintendent. 

ROANOKE 

ROANOKE CITY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (August 10, 1910) : 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 16. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical 
Director: — Dr. T. D. Armistead. Application should be made to the Health Officer. 



WASHINGTON 

BELLINGHAM 

TUBERCULOSIS CAMP OF THE WHATCOM COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS 

LEAGUE (1910); 
Capacity: — 10. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical Director: — Dr. E. C. 

Ruge, 305 Sunset Building. Application should be made tc the Medical Director. 

SEATTLE 

WALTER H. HENRY MEMORIAL SANATORIUM (191 1): 
For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 40. Secretary: — W. K. McKibben. Application 
should be made to the Anti-Tuberculosis League of King County. 

KING COUNTY HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS WARD (Georgetown P. O.) 

(1903): 
For consumptives without resources. Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 40. 
Rates: — There are no charges. Superintendent: — Dr. W. H. Corson. Application 
should be made to the Superintendent. 

PULMONARY HOSPITAL OF THE CITY OF SEATTLE (February i, 1910): 
For incipient cases only. Capacity: — 32. Rates: — $10.00 to $25.00 per week. Super- 
intendent: — Dr. A. L. Cook. Medical Director: — Dr. Elmer E. Heg. Application 
should be made to the Medical Durector. 



WEST VIRGINIA 
STATE SANATORIUM (not yet in operation) 

In February, 191 1, the Legislature passed a bill appropriating $40,000 for a State Sana- 
torium to be erected and maintained under the direction of the Boards of Control and 
Health. The sanatorium will be erected in 191 1. 

67 



SANATORIA WISCONSIN 

WHEELING 

OHIO COUNTY INFIRMARY TUBERCULOSIS PAVILION (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 
An appropriation has been made for the erection of a tuberculosis pavilion at the Ohio 
County Infirmary. It will be opened in igri. 

OHIO COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (not yet in operation): 

In 1910, a canijDaign was started to raise $15,000 for a sanatorium for Wheeling and 
vicinity. By January i, 1911, a considerable sum had been collected, and a site chosen. 
The sanatorium will probably be opened in June, 191 1. 



WISCONSIN 

WALES 

WISCONSIN STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM (November 7, 1907): 
For incipient and moderately advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity : — 130. Rates : 

— $5.00 to $10.00 per week for those able to pay. Others are admitted free as county charges. 

Superintendent and Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. W. Coon. Application should be 

made to the Superintendent. In the case of indigent patients, admission is by order of a 

county judge. 



MILWAUKEE (Wauwatosa) 

BLUE MOUND SANATORIUM (May 19, 1907): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — $10.00 per 
week. Medical Superintendent:— Dr. G. W. Moorehouse. Application should be made 
to the Secretary, 309 Goldsmith Building. 

MILWAUKEE MUNICIPAL TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in oper- 
ation) (1911): 
Capacity :• — 40. Rates : — There are no charges. 

MILWAUKEE 

TUBERCULOSIS WARD OF THE MILWAUKEE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, 

219 Tenth Street (1907): 
For cases of tuberculosis of the bones. Capacity of Tuberculosis Ward: — 18. 
Rates: — Free for indigent cases, and $1.00 per day for others. Superintendent: — Miss 
Helen Wapshott. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

STEVENS POINT 

RIVER PINES COTTAGE SANATORIUM (1906): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — $25.00 to 
$50.00 per week; $100.00 to $140.00 per month, including all medical and nursing attendance. 
Resident Surgeon: — Dr. F, E. Walbridge. Medical Director: — Dr. Thomas H. Hay. 
Application should be made either to the Medical Director at the sanatorium or to the 
Associate Director, Dr. H. E. Dearholt, Goldsmith Building, Milwaukee. (See advertise- 
ment, p. vii.) 

SUPERIOR 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL (not yet in operation): 

The Supervisors of Douglas County in 19 10 appropriated $7000 for a county hospital 
which will be opened in 191 1. 

68 



Hospitals for the Insane Making 

Special Provision for their 

Tuberculous Patients 



in the 

United States 



Hospitals for the Insane Making Special 

Provision for their Tuberculous 

Patients 

in the 

United States 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

In this section and the one on Penal Institutions an effort has been made 
to list every State hospital and prison which provides for its tuberculous 
patients or inmates in special wards, tents, pavilions, or isolates them in some 
particular manner. The marked benefits derived from the outdoor treatment 
of the insane and criminals have led to a large increase in this class of special 
institutions. The dates given in parentheses are those of the estabHshment of 
the tuberculosis departments of the several institutions. 

A few epileptic colonies and other institutions for the treatment of defec- 
tives have been included in this section. 



ALABAMA 

MOUNT VERNON 

THE MT. VERNON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 25. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. J.^T. 
Searcy, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Assistant Superintendent: — Dr. E. L. McCafferty. 

TUSCALOOSA 

BRYCE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1903) : 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. J. T. 

Searcy. 

CALIFORNIA 
PATTON 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA STATE HOSPITAL Quly i, 1907): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — ^36. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. E. S. 
Blair. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. Jessie H. Simpson. 

71 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE CONNECTICUT, ILLINOIS 

TALMAGE 

MENDOCINO STATE HOSPITAL: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — loo. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. E. W. 
King. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department:— Dr. G. D. Marvin. 



CONNECTICUT 



MIDDLETOWN 

CONNECTICUT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1900): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 30. Medical Superintendent :— Dr. Henry S. 
Noble. 



DELAWARE 



FARNHURST 

DELAWARE STATE HOSPITAL (1903): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Superintendent: — Dr. William R. 

Hancker. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1901): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 84. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. William 
A. WTiite. 

GEORGIA 

MILLEDGEVILLE 

GEORGLA. STATE SANITARIUM: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 130. Superintendent: — Dr. L. M. Jones. 



ILLINOIS 

ELGIN 

ELGIN STATE HOSPITAL (1895): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 35. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Sidney 
D. WCgus. 

72 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE INDIANA, IOWA 

HOSPITAL 

KANKAKEE STATE HOSPITAL: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 36. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. F. P. 

Norbury. 

JACKSONVILLE 

JACKSONVILLE STATE HOSPITAL (April, 1910): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 24. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. H. B. 
Carriel. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. R. T. Hinton, 

PEORIA 

PEORIA STATE HOSPITAL (1905): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 125. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. George 
A. Zeller. 

WATERTOWN 

WATERTOWN STATE HOSPITAL (March i, 1906): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 65. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. W. A, 
Crooks. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. A. H. DoUear. 



INDIANA 



LOGANSPORT 

NORTHERN HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1900): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 12. Medical Superintendent : — Dr. Frederick 
W. Terflinger. 



IOWA 

CHEROKEE 

CHEROKEE STATE HOSPITAL: 

An entire ward is set apart for the treatment of tuberculous patients, but an appropria- 
tion for separate buildings will be asked of the Legislature in 191 1. Other State hospitals 
will ask for similar appropriations. Superintendent: — Dr. M. N. Voldeng. 

CLARINDA 

CLARINDA STATE HOSPITAL: 

There is no special building, but tuberculous patients are treated in special isolation 
wards. A special appropriation will be asked of the Legislature in 191 1. Superintend- 
ent:— Dr. Max E. Witte. 

MT. PLEASANT 

MT. PLEASANT STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1904): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 40, Medical Superintendent: — Dr. C. F. 

Applegate. 



73 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE KANSAS, MASSACHUSETTS 

KANSAS 
OSAWATOMIE 

OSAWATOMIE STATE HOSPITAL (March i, 1911): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Medical Superintendent: — L. L. Uhls. 

TOPEKA 

TOPEKA STATE HOSPITAL (September, 1908): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 25. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. T. C. 
Biddle. 



KENTUCKY 

HOPKINSVILLE 

WESTERN KENTUCKY ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE (November i, 1910): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Superintendent: — Dr. H. P. Sights. 

LAKELAND 

CENTRAL KENTUCKY ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE (not yet in operation) : 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Superintendent: — Dr. W. E. Gardner. 

Note: — On January i, 191 1, the plans for this Department were still in the hands of the 

architect. 



LOUISLA.NA 
JACKSON 

EAST LOUISIANA HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (May, 1905): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 72. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Clarence 

Pierson. Physicians in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Drs. S. L. Thetford and 

O. P. Daly. 

MAINE 
BANGOR 

EASTERN MAINE INSANE HOSPITAL (1910): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 44. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Fred- 
erick L. Hills. 



MASSACHUSETTS 

HATHORNE 

DANVERS STATE HOSPITAL (1906): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 32. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. H. W. 

Mitchell. 

74 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA 

MEDFIELD 

MEDFIELD STATE ASYLUM (January, 1907): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 40. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Edward 
French. 

STATE FARM 

BRIDGEWATER STATE HOSPITAL FOR CRIMINAL INSANE (1895): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 15. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Alfred 
Elliott. 

TAUNTON 

TAUNTON STATE HOSPITAL (1911) (not yet in operation): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Superintendent: — Dr. Arthur V. Goss. 

Note : — Special provision for both male and female tuberculosis patients will be made in two 

extensions which will be completed in 191 1. 

WESTBOROUGH 

WESTBOROUGH STATE HOSPITAL (1907): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. George 
S. Adams. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. W. W. Coles. 

WORCESTER 

WORCESTER STATE HOSPITAL: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 23. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. H. M. 
Quimby. 



MICHIGAN 

KALAMAZOO 

MICHIGAN ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 40. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Alfred 
I.Noble. 

PONTIAC 

THE EASTERN MICHIGAN ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE: 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 35. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. E. A. 
Christian. 

TRAVERSE CITY 

NORTH MICHIGAN ASYLUM (1900): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 80. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. James D. 
Munson. 



MINNESOTA 

FARIBAULT 

MINNESOTA SCHOOL FOR FEEBLE-MINDED AND COLONY FOR EPILEP- 
TICS (November 14, 1907): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 28. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. A. C. 
Rogers. 

75 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE MISSISSIPPI, MISSOURI, NEW JERSEY 

ST. PETER 

ST. PETER STATE HOSPITAL: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 30. Superintendent: — Dr. H. A. Tomlinson. 



MISSISSIPPI 



ASYLUM (Hinds County) 

MISSISSIPPI STATE INSANE HOSPITAL (November i, 1907): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Nolan 
Stewart. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. John C. Herrington. 

MERIDIAN 

EAST MISSISSIPPI INSANE HOSPITAL (September, 1910): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 24. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. J. M. 
Buchanan. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. G. W. Stephens. 



MISSOURI 

FULTON 

STATE HOSPITAL NO. i (1911) (not yet in operation): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 90. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. George 
Williams. Note: — Hospital will be completed in summer of 191 1. 

NEVADA 

STATE HOSPITAL NO. 3 (January, 191 1): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — ^40. Superintendent: — Dr. J. W. Lamson. 



NEW JERSEY 

SKILLMAN 

NEW JERSEY STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS Quly, 1911) (not yet in 

operation) : 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 15. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. David 
Fairchild Weeks. 

TRENTON 

NEW JERSEY STATE HOSPITAL Qanuary, 1910): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Henry 
A. Cotton. 



76 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE NEW YORK 

NEW YORK 



BINGHAMTON 

BINGHAMTON STATE HOSPITAL (June i, 1905): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 100. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Charles 
G. Wagner. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department : — Dr. John I. McKelway. 

BUFFALO 

BUFFALO STATE HOSPITAL (December 11, 1909): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 16 (women). Medical Superintendent: — 
Dr. Arthur W. Hard. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. Helene 
J. Kuhlmann. 

CENTRAL ISLIP 

CENTRAL ISLIP STATE HOSPITAL (January 20, 1909) : 

Capacity for tuberculous patients:— 106. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. G. A. 
Smith. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. H. G. Gibson, Jr. 

GOWANDA 

GOWANDA STATE HOMEOPATHIC HOSPITAL (December 4, 1909): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. D. H. 

Arthur. 

KINGS PARK (Long Island) 

KINGS PARK STATE HOSPITAL: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 126. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. William 
Austin Macy. Physicians in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Drs. R. F. Cofi&n 
and John R. Ross. 

NEW YORK CITY (Ward's Island) 

MANHATTAN STATE HOSPITAL (1901) : 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 140. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. William 
Mabon. Physicians in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Drs. Arthur M. Phillips 
and Anna E. Hutchinson. 

OGDENSBURG 

ST. LAWRENCE STATE HOSPITAL (January 9, 1906): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients:— 112. Medical Superintendent:— Dr. R. H. 
Hutchings. 

POUGHKEEPSIE 

HUDSON RIVER STATE HOSPITAL (1898): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients:— no. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Charles 
W. Pilgrim. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department :— Dr. William C. Porter. 

ROME 

ROME STATE CUSTODIAL ASYLUM FOR THE FEEBLE-MINDED : 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Charles 
Bernstein. 

77 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE NORTH CAROLINA, OHIO, PENNSYLVANIA 

SONYEA 

CRAIG COLONY FOR EPILEPTICS (November i, 1910): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 60. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. William 
T. Shanahan. 

WILLARD 

WILLARD STATE HOSPITAL (November, 1908): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 70. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Robert 
M. Elliott. Physicians in Charge of Tuberculosis Department : — Drs. Irving HoUey and 
Louis T. Waldo. 



NORTH CAROLINA 



GOLDSBORO 

STATE HOSPITAL (November, 1909): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 44. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. W. W. 

Faison. 

MORGANTON 

STATE HOSPITAL (1908): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 24. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. John 
McCampbell. 



OHIO 



ATHENS 

ATHENS STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (December, loio): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 40. Superintendent : — Dr. O. O. Fordyce. 

COLUMBUS 

COLUMBUS STATE HOSPITAL (1902): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 120. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. C. F. 
Gilliam. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. H. M. Brundage. 



PENNSYLVANIA 



DIXMONT 

THE DIXMONT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1906): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 20 for female patients. Medical Superintend- 
ent: — Dr. H. A. Hutchinson. 

HARRISBURG 

PENNSYLVANLA. STATE LUNATIC HOSPITAL (1901): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 26. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. H. L. 
Orth. 

78 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE TEXAS, VERMONT, VIRGINIA 

NORRISTOWN 

STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (May, 1899): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 96. Physicians in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department: — Drs. W. W. Richardson and Elizabeth C. Spencer. 

WARREN 

STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (April 6, 1907): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. W. W. 
Hawke. Physicians in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Drs. J. J. Robb and E. 
B. Shellenberger. 

WERNERSVILLE 

THE STATE ASYLUM FOR THE CHRONIC INSANE OF PENNSYLVANIA: 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 15. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Samuel 

S. HiU. 



TEXAS 
AUSTIN 

TEXAS STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM (May i, 1910): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 70. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. John 
Preston. Physicians in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Drs. A. F. Beverly and 
L. J. Logue. 

SAN ANTONIO 

SOUTHWESTERN INSANE ASYLUM (June 7, 1910): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients :— 60. Medical Superintendent:— Dr. J. R. 

Nichols. 



VERMONT 

WATERBURY 

VERMONT STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1905): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 25. Superintendent:— Dr. Don. D. Grout. 
Note: — Tuberculous inmates of the State Prison are also cared for in this institution. 



VIRGINIA 

MARION 

SOUTHWESTERN STATE HOSPITAL (not yet in operation) : 

The State Legislature of 1909 appropriated $2,000 for a tuberculosis pavilion, this sum 
to be available for use in March, 191 1. Superintendent: — Dr. J. C. King. 

PETERSBURG 

CENTRAL STATE HOSPITAL (1904): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 75. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. William 
F. Drewry. 

79 



HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE WEST VIRGINIA, WISCONSIN 

STAUNTON 

WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL (1907): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 55. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. J. S. 
De Jamette. Physicians in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Drs. J. W. Freed 
and J. H. Garlick. 

WILLIAMSBURG 

EASTERN STATE HOSPITAL (Male Department, September, igog; Female Depart- 
ment, May, 1910): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. O. C. 

Brunk. 



WEST VIRGINIA 



WESTON 

WEST VIRGINIA HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (April 30, igio): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 12 for female patients. Medical Superin- 
tendent: — Dr. S. M. Steele. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — 
Dr. J. G. Pettit. 



WISCONSIN 



MILWAUKEE (Wauwatosa P. O.) 

MILWAUKEE HOSPITAL FOR INSANE (igo6): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Moses 
J. White. 



80 



Penal Institutions Making Special 
Provision for Their Tuber- 
culous Inmates 



in the 

United States 



Penal Institutions Making Special Pro- 
vision for Their Tuberculous Inmates 

in the 
United States 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

In this section and the one on Hospitals for the Insane an effort has been 
made to Hst every prison and State hospital which provides for its tubercu- 
lous inmates or patients in special wards, tents, pavilions, or isolates them in 
some particular manner. The marked benefits derived from the outdoor 
treatment of the criminals and insane have led to a large increase in this 
class of special institutions. The dates given are those of the establishment 
of the tuberculosis departments. 

ARIZONA 

FLORENCE 

ARIZONA PRISON (1909): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department: — Dr. George M. Brockway. 



CALIFORNIA 

SAN QUENTIN (Marin County) 

CALIFORNIA STATE PRISON (March, 1906): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 14. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department: — Dr. Ward J. Stone. 



COLORADO 

CANON CITY 

COLORADO STATE PENITENTIARY: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Prison Physician: — Dr. T. D. Pahner. 

83 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS CONNECTICUT, DELAWARE, GEORGIA, ILLINOIS 

CONNECTICUT 

WETHERSFIELD 

CONNECTICUT STATE PRISON (1898): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients:— 15. Warden:— Albert Gamn. Medical 
Superintendent: — Dr. Edward G. Fox. 



DELAWARE 

GREENBANK 

NEW CASTLE COUNTY WORKHOUSE (November, 1904): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 10. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department: — Dr. Samuel C. Rumford, 1403 Market Street, Wilmington, Del. 



GEORGIA 

ATLANTA 

UNITED STATES PENITENTIARY HOSPITAL (1905): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. A. L. 
Fowler. 

MILLEDGEVILLE 

GEORGIA PRISON FARM: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 50. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department:— Dr. John P. Atkinson. 



ILLINOIS 

JOLIET 

ILLINOIS STATE PENITENTIARY (1896): 

Warden:— E. J. Murphy. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — 

Dr. W. R. Fletcher, 1900 Collins Street. 

PONTIAC 

ILLINOIS STATE REFORMATORY: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 8. Medical Superintendent: — M. M. Mal- 
lary. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis department: — Dr. J. A. Marshall. 



84 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS INDIANA, MICHIGAN 

INDIANA 

JEFFERSONVILLE 

INDIANA REFORMATORY: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Prison Physician: — Dr. E. L. Swadener. 

IOWA 



ANAMOSA 

THE STATE REFORMATORY (December, 1910): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 15. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department: — Dr. T. C. Gorman. 



KENTUCKY 



EDDYVILLE 

KENTUCKY BRANCH PENITENTIARY: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 20. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department: — Dr. R. H. Moss. Note: — Roof garden will be built in 1911. 



MASSACHUSETTS 

BOSTON HARBOR 

DEER ISLAND HOSPITAL, SUFFOLK COUNTY HOUSE OF CORRECTION 

(June, 1900): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 12. Resident Physician: — Dr. Bernard F. M. 
McGafl&gan. 

WEST RUTLAND 

PRISON CAMP AND HOSPITAL (September, 1907): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 100. Superintendent: — George C. Erskine. 
Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. W. E. Chamberlain. Note: — 
Prisoners who have tuberculosis are transferred to this institution from all of the other state 
prisons and reformatories. 

MICHIGAN 
IONIA 

MICHIGAN REFORMATORY (September i, 1908): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 7. Warden: — Otis Fuller. Physician in 
Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. R. O. Knapp. 

8S 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS MINNESOTA, NEW YORK 

MINNESOTA 



ST. CLOUD 

MINNESOTA STATE REFORMATORY (July i, 1911): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 8. Superintendent: — Frank L. Randall. 
Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. O. H. Wolner, R. F. D. No. i. 

STILLWATER 

MINNESOTA STATE PRISON HOSPITAL (1912) (not yet in operation): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 12. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 

Department: — Dr. G. A. Newman. Note: — With the completion of the new state prison 

at Stillwater, a special tuberculosis pavilion will be opened. 



MISSOURI 



JEFFERSON CITY 

MISSOURI STATE PENITENTIARY (1910): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 10. 



NEW JERSEY 
RAHWAY 

NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY (not yet in operation) : 

The Legislature of 1910 appropriated to this institution a sufficient sum to build a roof 
garden for tuberculous inmates on the top of a two story building. This work will probably 
be done in 1911. Superintendent: — Frank Moore. Medical Director: — Dr. G. L. 
Orton. 



NEW MEXICO 

SANTA FE 

NEW MEXICO PENITENTIARY (1904): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 10. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. David 
Knapp. 

NEW YORK 

DANNEMORA 

CLINTON PRISON (1893): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 150. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
D epar tment : — Dr. J. B . Ransom. Note : — Tuberculous prisoners from all other state prisons 
and reformatories are transferred to this institution. 

86 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS OHIO, VIRGINIA 

OHIO 

COLUMBUS 

OHIO STATE PENITENTIARY: 

No separate building but a ward in the hospital building is set aside for advanced cases 
of tuberculosis. Chief Physician : — Dr. J. W. Clark. 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 



MANILA 

PRISON TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL, BILIBID PRISON: 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 200. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 

Department: — Dr. D. M. MoUoy. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

COLUMBIA 

THE GRIFFITH HOSPITAL OF SOUTH CAROLINA PENITENTIARY Qanuary, 
1907) : 

Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 25. Superintendent: — D. J. Griffith. Physi- 
cian in Charge of Tuberculosis Department: — Dr. F. W. P. Butler. 



TEXAS 

HUNTSVILLE 

WYNNE FARM FOR CONSUMPTIVE CONVICTS (1898): 
Capacity for tuberculous patients : — 60. Medical Superintendent : — Dr. Benjamin 
F. Gibson. 



VIRGINIA 



LASSITER (Goochland County) 

STATE FARM SANATORIUM (November 20, 1908): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 45. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department: — Dr. E. K. Bowles. 



87 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS WASHINGTON, WISCONSIN 

WASfflNGTON 



WALLA WALLA 

WASHINGTON STATE PENITENTIARY (August i, 1908): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 10. Penitentiary Physician: — Dr. L. R. 

QuUliam, Box 520. 



WISCONSIN 



GREEN BAY 

WISCONSIN STATE REFORMATORY (not yet in operation) : 

A hospital for tuberculous patients will be established when new buildings in process 
of erection are completed. Superintendent: — C. W. Bowvon. 

WAUPUN 

WISCONSIN STATE PRISON (1906): 

Capacity for tuberculous patients: — 6. Physician in Charge of Tuberculosis 
Department: — Dr. Rock Sleyster. 



88 



Dispensaries, Clinics and Classes 

for the Special Treatment 

of Tuberculosis 

in the 

United States 



Dispensaries, Clinics and Classes for 

the Special Treatment of 

Tuberculosis 



in the 
United States 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

In this section information is given not only concerning dispensaries espe- 
cially conducted for tuberculosis, but also concerning clinics or departments of 
general dispensaries in which special medical staffs and separate hours are set 
apart for tuberculous patients. Tuberculosis classes are also included in this 
section. 

The dispensaries are arranged alphabetically, according to location, under 
their separate states, the figures in parentheses denoting the date of opening. 



ALABAMA 

BIRMINGHAM 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, 424-425 
Chamber of Commerce Building (January 23, 191 1): 

Conducted by the Anti-Tuberculosis Association of Jefferson County. Hours : — Mon- 
days, Wednesdays, and Fridays, from 1.30 to 3.30 P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. 
Cabot Lull, H. S. Ward, Earle Drennen, and E. M. Mason. Secretary: — William M. 
McGrath, 308 Chamber of Commerce. 

MONTGOMERY 

FREE DISPENSARY OF THE MONTGOMERY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

(March, 1909): 
Hours : — Week days from i to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. S. E. Centerfit. 



91 



DISPENSARIES CALIFORNIA, CANADA, COLORADO 

CALIFORNIA 

BERKELEY 

TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT, BERKELEY DISPENSARY, Kithedge Street, 

(August I, iQio): 
Conducted by the Local Red Cross Chapter. Hours: — Week days from 9 to ii 
A. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. J. N. Force, W. A. Sawyer, and Clara A. Williams. 

LOS ANGELES 

LOS ANGELES HELPING STATION FOR INDIGENT CONSUMPTIVES 

(August, 1906): 
Conducted by the Los Angeles Society for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis. 
Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 4 to 6 P. M. Physicians in Charge : — 
Drs. George H. Kress, H. A. Huntoon, and Irving Bancroft. 

OAKLAND 

DISPENSARY OF THE ALAMEDA COUNTY SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY 

AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS, 525 17th Street (1910): 
Hours: — Tuesdays, 9 to 10 A. M.; Wednesdays, 11 A.M. to 12 M.; Thursdays, 7 to 8 
P. M.; Saturdays, 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Edward von Adelung. 

SAN DIEGO 

SAN DIEGO TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 611 G Street (June 23, 1909): 
Conducted by The San Diego Society for Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis. 

Hours: — Week days from 12 M. to 4 P.M. Superintendent: — Miss Katherine Hewitt, 

R. N., assisted by physicians of County Medical Association. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE SAN FRANCISCO ASSOCIATION FOR 
THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS, 1547 Jackson Street 
(January 18, 1909): 
Hours: — Week days from 8.30 to 10 A.M.; Mondays at 7 P. M, Secretary: — Dr. R. 
G. Brodrick. 



CANADA 

See Supplementary Directory of Anti-Tuberculosis Institutions and Or- 
ganizations in Canada, page 281. 



COLORADO 

PUEBLO 

MINNEQUA HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (September, 1910); 
Hours : — Two hours daily. Physician in Charge : — Dr. R. W. Corwin. 

92 



DISPENSARIES CONNECTICUT, DELAWARE 

CONNECTICUT 



HARTFORD 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE HARTFORD DISPENSARY, 56 Winthrop 

Street (February, 1908): 
Hours : — Mondays at 9 A. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Henry F. Stoll. 

NEW HAVEN 

NEW HAVEN DISPENSARY, TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, Corner Cedar Street 

and Congress Avenue (March, 1907): 
Hours: — Saturdays at i P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. F. B. Standish. 

SOUTH NORWALK 

SOUTH NORWALK TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (July, 1909): 

Hours: — Week days from 12 M. to i P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. William J. 

Tracey, Norwalk, and J. M. Coburn, South Norwalk. Nurse : — Miss Eleanor I. Hopkins. 

WATERBURY 

WATERBURY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE DISPENSARY, City Hall 

Annex (February, 1908): 
Hours: — Daily from 2 to 4 P. M., and Wednesday and Saturday mornings. Physi- 
cians in Charge: — Drs. Dudley B. Deming and John E. Farrell. 



DELAWARE 



DOVER 

DOVER DISPENSARY OF DELAWARE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMIS- 
SION (January i, 1910): 
Hours : — Fridays from 3 to 5 P. M. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. L. A. H. Bishop, 
W. F. Davis, P. S. Downs, C. de J. Harbordt, P. R. Steele, and J. H. Wilson. 

GEORGETOWN 

GEORGETOWN DISPENSARY OF THE DELAWARE STATE TUBERCU- 
LOSIS COMMISSION (March 2, 1910): 

Hours: — Wednesdays from 2.30 to 4 P.M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. Roland 
Paynter, O. B. Robinson, J. F. Jones, Joseph Waples, Sr., and Joseph Waples, Jr. 

HARRINGTON 

HARRINGTON DISPENSARY OF DELAWARE STATE TUBERCULOSIS 

COMMISSION (June i, 1910): 
Hours :— Thursdays from 3 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. T, G. Riley. 

LEWES 

LEWES DISPENSARY OF THE DELAWARE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COM- 
MISSION (August I, 1910): 

Hours : — Tuesdays from 2 to 3.30 P. M. Physicians in Charge :— Drs. James M. 
Martin and James Beebe. 

93 



DISPENSARIES CONNECTICUT, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

MILFORD 

MILFORD DISPENSARY OF DELAWARE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COM- 
MISSION (June I, 1909): 

Hours : — Thursdays from 11 A. M. to 1.30 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. William 
Marshall, Jr. 

SEAFORD 

SEAFORD DISPENSARY OF THE DELAWARE STATE TUBERCULOSIS 

COMMISSION (February 17, 1910): 
Hours: — Thursdays from 2 to 3.30 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Stacy B. 
Collins. 

SMYRNA 

SMYRNA DISPENSARY OF DELAWARE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COM- 
MISSION (May I, 1910): 
Hours: — Fridays from 9 to 11 A. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. E. S. Dwight. 

WILMINGTON 

NEWCASTLE COUNTY DISPENSARY OF THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS 
COMMISSION, 602 West Street (October, 1906): 

Hours: — Wednesdays from 3 to 5 P. M., and 8 to 10 P. M.; Thursdays and Saturdays 
from 3 to 5 P. M. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. Albert Robin, P. R. Smith, Bell, and Con- 
well Banton. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



WASfflNGTON 

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 13th and W Streets, N. W., 

Washington, D. C. (January, 19 10): 
Hours: — ^Tuesdays from 2 to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. E. P. Copeland. 

EASTERN DISPENSARY AND CASUALTY HOSPITAL, 708 Massachusetts 

Avenue, N. E. (1908): 
Hours : — Wednesdays and Saturdays from i to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. 
Lewis J. Battle. 

FREEDMEN'S HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 4th and College Streets, 

N. W. (February, 1910): 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in 
Charge:— Dr. H. H. Hazen. Surgeon-in-Chief :— Dr. W. A. Warfield. 

THROAT AND CHEST CLINIC OF THE CENTRAL DISPENSARY, isth Street 

and Ohio Avenue, N. W. (1907): 
Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays from i to 2 P. M. Physician in 
Charge:— Dr. J. D. Thomas. 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE ASSOCL/^TION FOR PREVENTION 
OF TUBERCULOSIS, 923 H Street, N. W. (June 5, 1905): 

Hours : — Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 2 to 3 P. M., and Fri- 
days from 8 to 9.30 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Jesse H. Ramsburgh. There are 
nine assistants in attendance. 

94 



DISPENSARIES GEORGIA, nXINOIS 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY HOSPI- 
TAL, 35th and N Streets, N. W. (December, 1907): 
Hours: — Mondays from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. William C. 
GwjTm. 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE NATIONAL HOMEOPATHIC HOSPITAL, 

2nd and N Streets, N. W. (January, 1908): 
Hours: — Wednesdays and Saturdays from i to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 
William R. Buchanan. 



GEORGIA 

ATLANTA 

ATLANTA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS AND VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION'S 
DISPENSARY (April 22, 1907): 

Hours: — Week days from 2 to 3 P. M. Chairman of Medical Staff: — Dr. R. R. 
Daly. Secretary: — Miss Rosa Lowe, 708 Gould Building. 

DISPENSARY NO. 2, FOR COLORED PEOPLE (August 3, 1909): 

Conducted by the Atlanta Visiting Nurse and Anti-Tuberculosis Association. Hours : 

—Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays from 3 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 

O. H. Matthews. 



ILLINOIS 

CHICAGO 

DISPENSARY DEPARTMENT OF THE CHICAGO MUNICIPAL TUBERCU- 
LOSIS SANITARIUM: 

On September i, 1910, the entire Dispensary Department of the Chicago Tuberculosis 
Institute, including dispensaries, nursing staff, and all dispensary faciUties, was taken over 
by the Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium of Chicago. These will form the nucleus of a city- 
wide system of clinics, offering facilities for the complete care and control of tuberculosis in 
Chicago. Superintendent:— Frank E. Wing, 157 West Adams Street. Superintendent 
of Nurses: — Miss Edna L. Foley, R. N. The following are the dispensaries in Chicago 
now in the department: 

CENTRAL FREE DISPENSARY, Rush Medical College, 1744 West Harrison Street 

(1908): 
Hours : — Wednesdays and Saturdays from 9 to 1 1 A. M. Physicians in Charge :— Drs. 
John Ritter and Clarence Wheaton. 

CHICAGO POLYCLINIC HOSPITAL DISPENSARY, 221 East Chicago Avenue 

(1907): 
Hours : — ^Tuesdays and Fridays from 10 A. M. to 12 M. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. 
O. W. McMichael, Harry Ware, Paul Morf, and G. W. Wagner. 

GADS HILL FREE DISPENSARY, Corner Twentieth and Robey Streets (1909): , 
Hours: — Wednesdays and Saturdays from i to 3 P. M., Thursdays from 7 to 8 P. M. 
Physicians in Charge: — Drs. Katherine B. Rich and Clyde D. Pence. 

HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL FREE DISPENSARY, 281 1 Cottage Grove Avenue 

(1908): 
Hours: — Mondays and Thursdays from 2.30 to 4 P.M. Physicians m Charge: — 
Drs. A. L. Blackwood and H. C. Miller. 

95 



DISPENSARIES ILLINOIS, INDIANA 

mOQUOIS MEMORIAL DISPENSARY, 87 Market Street (February 21, 191 1): 
Hours: — Mondays from 9 to 11 A.M.; Tuesdays and Fridays from 7 to 9 P.M.; 

Saturdays from 2 to 4 P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. John Ritter, Clarence L. 

Wheaton, and M. Karasek. 

NORTHWEST DISPENSARY, St. Elizabeth's Day Nursery, Comer Blackhawk and 
Ashland Avenues (April i, 191 1). 

POST-GRADUATE HOSPITAL DISPENSARY, 2400 Dearborn Street (1909): 
Hours: — Mondays and Thursdays from 10 A. M. to 12 M. Physicians in Charge: — 
Drs. James Cole, Patrick Mills, and F. A. Berry. 

PROVIDENT HOSPITAL DISPENSARY, Corner 36th and Dearborn Streets (April i, 
191 1). (For colored patients.) 

STOCK YARDS FREE DISPENSARY, 723 West Forty-seventh Street (1908) : 
Hours : — Tuesdays and Saturdays from 9 to 10 A. M. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. 
James A. Harvey and G. A. Gardner. 

WEST SIDE FREE DISPENSARY OF THE JEWISH AID SOCIETY, Corner 

Morgan and Maxwell Streets (1908): 
Hours : — Mondays and Thursdays from 3 to 5 P. M. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. 
Theodore B. Sachs, Max Biesenthal, James Britton, and Charles Segal. 

PEORIA 

BACON MEMORLAL MISSION DISPENSARY, Neighborhood House Dispensary 

(October 18, 1910): 
Hours: — Tuesdays and Fridays from 12 M. to i P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. 
S. M. Miller and J. H. Bacon. 

SPRINGFIELD 

THE SPRINGFIELD TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 7171^ East Washington 
Street (January 15, 191 1): 

Conducted by the Springfield^Tuberculosis Association. Hours : — Mondays, Tuesdays, 
and Thursdays from 10 A. M. to 12 M.; Fridays from 7 to 9 P. M.; and Saturdays from 10 
A. M. to 12 M., for children only. Superintendent: — Dr. George Thomas Palmer. 



INDIANA 

EVANSVILLE 

EVANSVILLE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY CLINIC (May 12, 1908): 
Hours : — Week days from 2.30 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. James Y. 
Welborn, assisted by seventeen others. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

INDIANAPOLIS TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, Corner Senate Avenue and Market 

Street (Re-organized, November 13, 1908): 
Conducted by the City of Indianapolis. Hours: — Week days from 8 to 11 A. M.; 
Thursdays, from 3 to 5 P. M. Superintendent: — Dr. Jewett V. Reed. 



96 



DISPENSARIES IOWA, KANSAS, KENTUCKY 

IOWA 



DES MOINES 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF DRAKE MEDICAL SCHOOL (April i, 

1911): 
Hours: — Tuesdays and Fridays from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physicians in Charge: — 
Drs. W. L. Bierring and John L. Peck. 



KANSAS 



TOPEKA 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE TOPEKA ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS, 106 W. Eighth Street 
(Februarj' 8, 191 1): 

Hours: — ^Tuesdays and Saturdays at 1.30 P.M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. 
Edgar A. Billings and C. B. Van Horn. 



KENTUCKY 



GEORGETOWN (not yet in operation) : 

The Scott County Anti-Tuberculosis Association has perfected plans to open a dispensary 
in Georgetown in 191 1. 

HENDERSON 

HENDERSON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION FREE DISPENSARY, 

City Building (February 14, 1910) : 
Hours :— Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 4 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
—Dr. J. C. Mosely. Visiting Nurse:— Miss M. Priest. 

LEXINGTON 

THE LEXINGTON FREE TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 618 West Main 

Street (February 10, 191 1): 
Hours: — Tuesdays and Fridays from 8.30 A. M. to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge: — 
Dr. Ernest Bradley. Nurse : — Miss Chloe Jackson. 

LOUISVILLE 

LOUISVILLE TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 121 West Chestnut Street Qune, 
1907): 

Conducted by the LoijisviUe Anti-Tuberculosis Association and The Board of Tuberculosis 
Hospital. Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 5 to 6 P. M. All other days 
from 9 to 10 A. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Durming S. Wilson. 

OWENSBORO (not yet in operation) : 

The Owensboro Anti-Tuberculosig Association has perfected plans to open a dispensary 
in 1911. 

7 97 



DISPENSARIES LOUISIANA, MAINE, MARYLAND 

LOUISIANA 

NEW ORLEANS 

DISPENSARY OF THE LOUISIANA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE, 1309 

Tulane Avenue (November 2, 190S): 
Hours: — Week days from 9 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. A. I. Weil. 

MAINE 



AUBURN 

FREE CLASS OF ANDROSCOGGIN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION 

(June 30, 1910): 
Hours: — Mondays from 7 to 8 P. M.; Saturdays from 2 to 3 P. M. Physicians in 
Charge: — Drs. Ralph A. Parker, Walter Parmalee, Auburn; and Herbert S. Sleeper, Lewis- 
ton. District Nurse: — Mrs. Harrison R. Thornton, Auburn. 

BANGOR 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF BANGOR ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIA- 
TION, York Street (1909): 
Hours : — Tuesdays at 9 A. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. W. C. Peters. 

PORTLAND 

PORTLAND CHARITABLE DISPENSARY TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 55 India 

Street (March 10, 1910): 
Hours: — Tuesdays from 10 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge:— Dr. F. J. Welch. 

PORTLAND TUBERCULOSIS CLASS, Emanuel Chapel (February 21, 1908): 
Hours : — Once a week. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Thomas J. Burrage. 

WATERVILLE 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE CENTRAL MAINE ASSOCIATION 
FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS, Corner Common 

and Front Streets (August 2, 1910): 
Hours : — Tuesday and Friday mornings, and Saturdays from 4 to 6 P. M. Physician 
in Charge : — Dr. A. A. Downs. 

MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE 

CHRIST CHURCH TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 602 S. Broad St. (July 1, 
1907): 

Conducted by the Maryland Association for the Prevention and Relief of Tuberculosis. 
Hours :— Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 4 P. M. Physician in Charge :— Dr. 
John Girdwood. 

DEPARTMENT OF DISEASES OF THE LUNGS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND DISPENSARY, Lombard and Greene Streets (1906): 
Hours: — Daily from 12 M. to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Gordon Wilson. 

98 



DISPENSARIES MASSACHUSETTS 

PHIPPS DISPENSARY, JOHNS HOPKINS HOSPITAL (March i, 1905): 
Hours : — Week days, 10 A. M. to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Louis Hamman. 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL (February, 1906): 
Hours: — Daily from 12 M. to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. William Dulany 
Thomas. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON 

ARLINGTON STREET CHURCH TUBERCULOSIS CLASS, 13 Burroughs Place 

(May I, 1906): 
Hours : — Once a week. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Nathaniel K. Wood. 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OF THE BOSTON CONSUMPTIVES HOS- 
PITAL, 13 Burroughs Place (September 11, 1907): 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 9 A.M. to i P.M. 
Physician in Charge : — Dr. Cleaveland Floyd. 

TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT, BOSTON DISPENSARY (February 8, 1899) : 
Hours: — Week days from 9 to 11 A. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. Edward O. 

Otis, H. F. R. Watts, Bradford Kent, E. A. Burnham, David Townsend, and Charles A. Riley. 

At least two of the staff are constantly on duty. Director : — Michael M. Davis. 

SOCIAL SERVICE AND TUBERCULOSIS CLASS OF CARNEY HOSPITAL, 

South Boston (December i, 1908): 
Hours: — Fridays from 10 A.M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. John M. 
Kelly. 

DENISON HOUSE EVENING DISPENSARY, 93 Tyler Street (January, 1908): 
Hours: — Wednesday evenings. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. Wyman Whittemore 
and Roger I. Lee. 

DORCHESTER FREE DISPENSARY, 204 Adams Street, Dorchester (July, 1906) : 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 to 10 A.M. Agent: — Miss H. 
Eugenia Bruce. Chairman of Medical Committee: — Dr. Samuel Crowell. 

EMANUEL CHURCH TUBERCULOSIS CLASS (July i, 1905): 
Hours: — Thursdays at 9 A. M. Medical Director: — Dr. Joseph H. Pratt. 

LINCOLN HOUSE DISPENSARY, 80 Emerald Street, Roxbury (December, 1898): 

Hours: — Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 to 11 A. M., and Wednesdays 

from 8 to 9 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Charles E. Williams. Note: — Has no 

special tuberculosis clinic, but makes some provision for tuberculosis cases in general clinic. 

Mainly for colored patients. 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE EYE 

AND EAR INFIRMARY (for Tuberculosis of the Eye) (January, 1909) : 
Hours: — Tuesdays at 9 A. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. George S. Derby and 
Theodore J. Eastman. 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL 

(1905): 
Hours: — Thursdays at 9 A. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. John B. Hawes, 2d. 

99 



DISPENSARIES MASSACHUSETTS 

MASSACHUSETTS HOMEOPATHIC HOSPITAL, 750 Harrison Avenue: 
Hours :— Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 9 to 10 A. M. Physi- 
cian in Charge : — Dr. William O. Mann. 

MOUNT SINAI TUBERCULOSIS CLASS, Mt. Sinai Hospital (April, 1907): 
Hours : — Once a week. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. H. Linenthal and L. Mendel- 
sohn. 

ROXBURY HOMEOPATHIC DISPENSARY, 1224 Tremont Street, Roxbury Cross- 
ing (1887): 

Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 A.M. to 12 M.; 
Tuesdays and Fridays from 8.30 to 10 A. M., and Saturdays from 8 to 9 P. M. Phy- 
sician in Charge: — Dr. Dana Fletcher Downing. Note: — Has no special tuberculosis 
clinic, but treats tuberculosis cases in general clinic and also follows up all cases. 

BROCKTON 

FREE TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 31 Centre Street (June 21, 1909): 
Conducted by Brockton Anti-Tuberculosis Society. Hours : — Mondays and Satur- 
days from 10 A. M. to 12 M.; Thursdays from 7.35 to 9 P. M.; and from 11 A. M. to 12 
M. and 4 to 5 P.M. on other days, except Saturday afternoon. General Secretary: — 
Miss Effie M. Eldredge. 

CAMBRIDGE 

CAMBRIDGE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION DISPENSARY, 689 

Massachusetts Avenue (February i, 1905): 
Hours: — Mondays and Saturdays from 10 to 11 A.M., and Thursdays from 7.30 to 
9 P. M. Children's clinic open on Saturdays from 10 to 11 A. M. Physician in Charge: 
—Dr. Fred R. Jouett. 

CHELSEA 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH (October, 1910): 
Hours: — Wednesdays from 3 to 4 P.M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. George B. 
Fenwick and J. G. McPhail. 

FITCHBXJRG 

FREE TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF FITCHBURG, 14s Main Street (March 3, 
1909) : 

Conducted by Fitchburg Society for Control and Cure of Tuberculosis. Hours: — 
Saturdays from 3 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Robert Rice. Visiting Nurse : — 
Miss Annie B. Rose. 

GARDNER 

GARDNER DISPENSARY FOR RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (September 5, 1909): 

Conducted by the Gardner Association for Relief and Control of Tuberculosis. Hours : 
— Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10.30 A. M. to 12 M., and Fridays from 7.30 to 9 
P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Lawrence E. Poole. 

HAVERHILL 

DISPENSARY OF THE HAVERHILL ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF 
AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS (March, 1908): 

Hours :— Wednesdays and Saturdays from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge:— Dr. 
I. J. Clarke, 



DISPENSARIES MASSACHUSETTS 

HAVERHILL TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION CLASS, 28 White Street (April 

7, 1908): 
Hours : — Once every two weeks. Physician in Charge : — Dr. I. J. Clarke. 

LYNN 

TUBERCULOSIS CLASS OF THE LYNN TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLA.TION 

(1907): 
Hours : — Mondays at 2 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. H. P. Bennett. Nurse : — 
Miss Isabelle G. Edgar. 

MALDEN 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES (March, 
1908) : 

Conducted by the Committee on Tuberculosis of the Associated Charities. Hours: — 
Two days a week from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Godfrey Ryder. 

NEW BEDFORD 

CHARITY ORGANIZATION SOCIETY DISPENSARY FOR FREE EXAMINA- 
TION AND TREATMENT OF DISEASES OF THE LUNGS, 52 Pleasant Street, 
Rooms 4 and 5 (May 29, 1909) : 
Hours: — Saturdays from 9 to 10 A. M., and Wednesdays from 7.30 to 8.30 P. M. 
Physician in Charge : — Dr. Erik St. J. Johnson. 

NEWBURYPORT 

NEWBURYPORT ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLATION TUBERCULOSIS 
CLASS, 2 Essex Street (March, 1909): 

Hours: — Wednesdays from 9.30 to 11 P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. Arthur 
C. Nason and R. C. Kurd. 

PITTSFIELD 

DISPENSARY OF PITTSFIELD ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION, 

House of Mercy Hospital (October, 1908) : 
Hours: — Saturdays from 11 A.M. to i P.M. Secretary: — Miss Julia Redfield, 290 
South Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 

SALEM 

SALEM TUBERCULOSIS CLASS, 10 Washington Square (January 8, 1908): 
Hours: — Once a week. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Walter G. Phippen. 

SOUTH FRAMINGHAM 

FRAMINGHAM HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC (1910) : 

Conducted in co-operation with the South Framingham Relief and Anti-Tuberculosis 

Association. Hours: — Week days from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. Secretary: — Mrs. N. M. Den- 

nison, 26 Pearl Street. 

WINCHESTER 

WINCHESTER TUBERCULOSIS CLASS, Waterfield Hall (May i, 1908): 
Hours : — Once a week. Director : — Mrs. Henry L. Houghton. 

WORCESTER 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE WORCESTER CITY HOSPITAL (January, 
1904) : 

Hours : — Mondays and Thursdays from 9 to 10 A. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. 
Albert C. Getchell, assisted by two others. 



DISPENSARIES MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA 

WASHBURN FREE DISPENSARY, TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC (May, 1907): 
Conducted by the Memorial Hospital. Hours: — Two days a week at 5 P. M. Phy- 
sicians in Charge : — Drs. Merrick Lincohi and Roy J. Ward. 



MICHIGAN 

CALUMET 

HOUGHTON COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (July 15, 1910): 
Conducted by the Houghton County Anti-Tuberculosis Society. Hours: — Saturdays 
from 3 to 5 P. M. Secretary: — Miss Margaret Scallon, Hancock. 

DETROIT 

BOARD OF HEALTH TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC (April, 1906): 
Hours: — Week days from 9 A.M. to 12.30 P.M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. 
V. C. Vaughan, Jr., and S. H. McFall. 

FLORENCE CRITTENTON FREE DISPENSARY, St. Antoine and Elizabeth 

Streets (January 3, 191 1): 
Hours : — Week days from 9 to 10 A. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. R. E. Mercer. 

GRAND RAPIDS 

FREE DISPENSARY OF THE GRAND RAPIDS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS 

SOCIETY (July i, 1908): 
Hours: — Week days from 12 M. to i P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Collins H. 
Johnston. 

HANCOCK 

HANCOCK CITY DISPENSARY (October i, 1910): 

Conducted by the City of Hancock and the Houghton County Anti-Tuberculosis So- 
ciety. Hours: — Wednesdays from 3 to 5 P. M. Secretary: — Miss Margaret Scallon. 



MINNESOTA 



DULUTH 

COUNTY OF ST. LOUIS SANATORIUM COMMISSION TUBERCULOSIS 
CLINIC (May 31, 1910): 

Hours: — Tuesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 6 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 
William M. Hart. 

MINNEAPOLIS 

MINNEAPOLIS CITY HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (May, 1909): 
Hours: — Week days from 5 to 6 P. M. Superintendent: — Dr. Herbert O. Collins. 

UNIVERSITY FREE DISPENSARY (1898): 

Conducted by the University of Minnesota, a State Institution. Hours : — Week days 
from I to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Jennings C. Litzenberg. 



DISPENSARIES MISSOURI 

ST. PAUL 

NEW CENTRAL DISPENSARY OF ST. PAUL ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COM- 
MITTEE, 26 West 3rd Street (December 12, 1909): 
Hours: — Mondays and Thursdays at 10 A. M.; all other week days at i P. M. Phy- 
sician in Charge : — Dr. H. L. Taylor. 



MISSOURI 

KANSAS CITY 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF 

KANSAS CITY (September 27, 1909): 
Hours: — Week days at 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Charles B. Irwin. 

ST. LOUIS 

ALEXIAN BROTHERS' HOSPITAL DISPENSARY, 3933 South Broadway (1910): 
Hours: — Week days from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. C. H. 
Neilson. 

BARNES UNIVERSITY DISPENSARY, Ewing and Lawton Avenues (1910): 
Hours: — Week days from 10 to 11 A. M. 

CHILDREN'S FREE HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 400 South Jefferson 

Street (1910): 
Hours : — Week days from 3 to 4 P. M. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. George M. Tuttle 
and Nathaniel Allison. 

CLINIC FOR COMMUNICABLE LUNG DISEASES, nth and Market Streets 
(July 6, 1906) : 

Hours: — Week days from 8 to 11 A. M. and 4 to 6 P. M.; and Sundays from 9 to 11 
A.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. A. C. Henske. Chief Dispensary Physician: — Dr. 
C. D. Scott. 

EVENING DISPENSARY FOR WOMEN, 1607 Wash Street: 
Hours: — Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 7.30 to 9.30 P. M. 
Physician in Charge : — Dr. Frances L. Bishop. 

JEWISH HOSPITAL DISPENSARY, TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 9th and Carr 

Streets (1902): 
Hours: — Week days from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. Director and Chief of Staff: — Dr. 
Hugo Ehrenfest. Note : — Tuberculous cases are not given a special room or separate hours. 

MULANPHY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY, Montgomery and Bacon Streets (1910): 
Hours: — Week days from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Edward 
Sheehan. 

O 'FALLON DISPENSARY, 1806 Locust Street: 

Hours : — Week days from 11 A. M. to 1 2 M. and 3 to 4 P. M. Physicians in Charge : — 
Drs. O. W. Smith and D. K. Parrish. 

PHYSICIANS' AND SURGEONS' DISPENSARY, Jefferson Avenue and Gamble 

Street: 
Hours : — Week days from 1 1 A. M. to 1 2 M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. O. L. Walters. 

103 



DISPENSARIES NEW HAMPSHIRE, NEW JERSEY 

ST. JOHN'S DISPENSARY, 2228 Locust Street: 

Hours: — Week days from 11 A.M. to 12 M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. William 
Engelbach and E. P. Porterlield. 

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, Grand Avenue and Caroline Street: 
Hours: — Week days from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. L. C. Bois- 
liniere. 

V/ASHINGTON UNIVERSITY DISPENSARY, 615 North Jefferson Avenue: 
Hours : — Week days from 10 A. M. to 12 M. and from 2 to 3 P. M.; Sundays, from 9 to 
10 A. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. L. H. Behrens. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



PORTSMOUTH 

PORTSMOUTH TUBERCULOSIS CLASS (August 17, 1910): 
Hours: — Wednesdays from 10 A. M. to 2 P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. S. T. 
Ladd and C. W. Harmaford. 



NEW JERSEY 

CAMDEN 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE CAMDEN CITY DISPENSARY, 725 Federal 

Street (April, 1908): 
Hours : — Two days a week at 9 A. M. 

ELIZABETH 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE ELIZABETH GENERAL HOSPITAL, 

Comer of East Jersey and Reid Streets (July 15, 1909): 
Conducted by the Elizabeth Association for the Prevention and Relief of Tuberculosis. 
Hours: — Thursdays and Saturdays at 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. P. Du Bois 
Bunting. 

JERSEY CITY 

FREE TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC (November 10, 1910) : 

Conducted by the Committee on Tuberculosis of the Hudson County Federation of 
Women's Clubs. Chairman: — Mrs. G. W. Black, 109 Belmont Avenue. 

MONTCLAIR 

TUBERCULOSIS CLASS, OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT, MOUNTAIN-SIDE 

HOSPITAL (November 30, 1907): 
Hours : — Wednesdays from 4 to 5 P. M. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. Stella S. Brad- 
ford and John H. Young. 

MORRISTOWN 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE MORRISTOWN ANTI-TUBER- 
CULOSIS SOCIETY (August 17, 1909): 
Hours : — Tuesdays at 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Clifford Mills. 

104 



DISPENSARIES NEW JERSEY, NEW YORK 

NEWARK 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, NEWARK CITY DISPENSARY, Center Market, 

Broad Street (March i8, 1908): 
Conducted by the Board of Health. Hours: — Mondays and Wednesdays from 3 to 
4.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. H. Satchwell. 

ORANGE 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (April i, 1904): 
Conducted by the Anti-tuberculosis Committee of the Oranges. Hours: — Two days 

a week from 12 M. to i P. M., and Thursdays from 8 to 9 P. M. Physician in Charge :— 

Dr. Ralph H. Hunt. Visiting Nurse :— Miss Margaret J. Orr, 

PATERSON 

PATERSON TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 99 Cross Street (August 23, 1909) : 
Conducted by Paterson Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis. Hours: — 
Tuesdays and Fridays from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. O. R. Hagan, Visit- 
ing Nurse: — Miss Kate Golding, Room i, City Hall. 

PHILLIPSBURG 

DISPENSARY OF ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY OF PHILLIPSBURG 

(January 5, 191 1): 
Hours :— Thursdays from 3 to 4 P.M. Secretary: — Mrs. Jacob Henderson, 158 
Bullman Street. 

PLAINFIELD 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE PLAINFIELD ANTI-TUBERCULO- 
SIS ASSOCIATION (1911) (not yet in operation): 
Medical Director: — Dr. Edward S, Krans. Note: — Will be estabUshed in 1911. 



NEW YORK 

ALBANY 

SOUTH END DISPENSARY, CLINIC FOR PULMONARY DISEASES (July i, 

1908) : 
Conducted by the South End Dispensary, a private corporation. Hours : — Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays from 4 to 6 P. M., and Saturdays from 7 to 8 P. M. Physician 
in Charge : — Dr. Arthur T. Laird. 

AMSTERDAM 

CITY TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (September 13, 1910): 

Hours: — Week days from 9 to 10 A. M.; Tuesdays and Fridays from 3.30 to 5 P. M. 

Physician in Charge: — Dr. James S. Walton, Health Officer. Visiting Nurse: — Miss 

Margaret H. Markham, 38 East Main Street. 

BROOKLYN (See New York, Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens) 

BUFFALO 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE BUFFALO ASSOCIATION FOR 
THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS, 165 Swan Street (Decem- 
ber 9, 1907) : 
Hours: — Week days from 10 A. M, to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. George J. 
Eckel. 

loS 



DISPENSARIES NEW YORK 

COHOES 

COHOES FREE DISPENSARY FOR TUBERCULOSIS, City HaU, Room 25 

(June 2, igog): 
Hours :— Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 3 to 4 P. RI. Physicians in Charge : 
— Drs. Joseph Charles Daunais and Mathew J. Keough. Nurse: — Miss Catherine Dunn. 

DUNKIRK 

DUNKIRK FREE TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 14 East Fourth Street (March 

22, igio): 
Conducted by the Board of Health. Hours: — Tuesdays and Fridays from 4 to 5 
P. M. Nurse in Charge : — Miss Louise A. Lennertz. 

JAMAICA (See New York, Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens) 
JAMESTOWN 

JAMESTOWN TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC (January 15, 1910): 
Physician in Charge: — Dr. William M. Bemus. 

KINGSTON 

RELIEF STATION, City HaU (July i, 1910): 

Conducted by the Kingston Committee for the Relief and Prevention of Tuberculosis. 
Hours: — Week days from 9 to 10 A. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Mary Gage-Day. 

MIDDLETOWN 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF MIDDLETOWN, 66 East Main Street 
(January 25, 1911): 

Hours: — Week days from 8.30 to 9.30 A. M. and from i to 2 P. M.; Tuesdays from 
3.30 to 4.30 P. M.; Saturdays from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Secretary: — Mrs. Daniel Finn, 
74 Highland Avenue. 

NEW YORK (Boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx and Richmond) 

THE ASSOCLATION OF TUBERCULOSIS CLINICS, 105 East 22d Street (1908): 
President: — Dr. James Alexander Miller. Vice-President:— Dr. John H. Huddle- 
ston. Secretary: — Lawrence Veiller. Assistant Secretary: — Frank H. Mann. Execu- 
tive Secretary: — INIiss F. Elisabeth Crowell. The following clinics of the boroughs 
of Manhattan, the Bronx and Richmond (excluding classes) are members of the 
Association: 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL CLINIC, Foot of East 26th Street (1903): 
Hours : — Week days from i to 3 P. M.; Children's Clinic, Tuesdays and Saturdays from 
1.30 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. James Alexander Miller. 

FLOWER HOSPITAL CLINIC, E. Boulevard and 63rd Street (1909): 
Hours : — Wednesdays and Saturdays from 2.30 to 3.30 P. M. Physician in Charge : — 
Dr. Ro\al S. Copeland. 

GERMAN HOSPITAL CLINIC, 76th Street and Park Avenue (1908): 
Hours : — Week days from 3 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. A. Jacobi. 

GOOD SAMARITAN CLINIC, 75 Esse.x Street (1909): 

Hours: — Weekdays from 2.30 104.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Bruno S. 
Horowicz. 

GOUVERNEUR HOSPITAL CLINIC, Foot of Gouvemeur Slip (1903): 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 2 to 4 P. M.; Tuesdays, Thursdays, 
and Saturdays from 4 to 6 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. John H. Huddleston. 

106 



DISPENSARIES NEW YORK 

HARLEM HOSPITAL CLINIC, 136th Street and Lenox Avenue (1904): 
Hours: — Week days from 2.30 to 3.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Arthur 
M. Shrady. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT EAST SIDE CLINIC, 81 East 2nd Street (1910): 
Hours: — Week days from 10 A. M. to 4 P. M.; Thursdays and Saturdays from 8 to 
9 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Bertram H. Waters. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT HARLEM ITALIAN CLINIC, 339 East 109th Street 

(1910): 
Hours: — Week days from 10 A. M. to 12 M.; Tuesdays from 8 to 9 P. M. Physician 
in Charge : — Dr. Bertram H. Waters. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT WEST SIDE CLINIC, ssth Street and 6th Avenue C1904) : 
Hours: — Week days from 10 A. M. to 4 P. M.; Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8 to 
9 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Bertram H. Waters. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT BRONX NORTHERN CLINIC, 3rd Avenue and St. 

Paul's Place (1906): 
Hours: — Week days from 2 to 4 P. M.; Thursdays from 8 to 9 P. M. Physician in 
Charge : — Dr. Karl S. Kennard. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT BRONX SOUTHERN CLINIC, 493 East 139th Street 

(1910): 
Hours: — Week days from 10 A. M. to 12 M.; Tuesdays from 8 to 9 P. M. Physician 
in Charge: — Dr. Karl S. Kennard. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT RICHMOND CLINIC, Bay Street, Stapleton, S. I. 

(December, 1910): 
Hours : — ^Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
—Dr. C. W. Walser. 

MORGAGNI CLINIC, 169 West Houston Street (1908): 

Hours : — Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
— Dr. Antonio Stella. 

MT. SINAI HOSPITAL CLINIC, Madison Avenue and looth Street (1908): 
Hours: — Week days from 10 to 11 A.M.; Children's Clinic, Saturdays from 2 to 4 
P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Alfred Meyer. 

NEW YORK DISPENSARY, 145 Worth Street (1907): 

Hours: — Week days from 11 A. M. to 12.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 
Robert A. Eraser. 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL CLINIC, 8 West i6th Street (1907) : 

Hours: — Week days from i to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Hughes Dayton. 

NEW YORK THROAT, NOSE AND LUNG HOSPITAL CLINIC, 229 East 57th 

Street (1894): 
Hours : — Week days from 3 to 8 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. E. A. Miller. 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL CLINIC, 70th Street and Madison Avenue (1895): 
Hours: — Week days from 1.30 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. L. 

Shively. 

ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S CLINIC, 209 East 42nd Street (1909) : 
Hours : — Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
—Dr. J. J. Cotter. 

107 



DISPENSARIES NEW YORK 

ST. GEORGE'S TUBERCULOSIS CLASS, St. George's Memorial House (October 

24, 1907): 
Hours : — Thursdays at 2.30 P. M., and first Tuesday of each month at 8 P. M. Phy- 
sician in Charge: — Dr. N. Gilbert SejTnour, 129 East 17th Street. 

ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL CLINIC, Amsterdam Avenue and 113th Street (1906): 
Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
—Dr. A. W. HoUis. 

ST. VINCENT'S HOSPITAL CLINIC, 149 West nth Street (1909): 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 to 11 A.M. Physician in 
Charge : — Dr. Charles H. Lewis. 

VANDERBILT CLINIC, Amsterdam Avenue and 60th Street (1902): 

Hours: — Week days from-i to 2.30 P. M.; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 

9 to 10.30 A. M.; Children's Clinic, Saturdays at 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. F. 

Morris Class. 

NEW YORK (Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens) 

THE ASSOCLA.TION OF TUBERCULOSIS CLINICS OF BROOKLYN AND 
QUEENS, Comer Willoughby Street and Flatbush Avenue (1910): 

President: — Dr. J. L. Baker. Vice-President:— Dr. F. E. A. Stoney. Secretary:— 
Dr. W. Brown. Executive Secretary: — Miss E. Whitehead. The following clinics of 
the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens (excluding classes) are members of the Asso- 
ciation: 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, DISPENSARY OF BAY RIDGE HOSPITAL, 60th 

Street and Second Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. (March 8, 1909): 
Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
—Dr. F. E. A. Stoney. 

BEDFORD TUBERCULOSIS CLASS OF THE BROOKLYN COMMITTEE ON 

THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS, 1660 Fulton Street (May i, 1908): 

Hours : — Once every two weeks. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Norton. Secretary : — 

James Jenkins, Jr., 69 Schermerhom Street. 

BROOKLYN EASTERN DISTRICT HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 

108 South 3rd Street (July i, 1909): 
Hours: — Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in 
Charge : — Dr. Louis T. Fricke. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT BOAT CLINIC, Foot of North 2nd Street (1909): 
Hours : — Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
—Dr. J. L. Baker. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT BROWNSVILLE CLINIC, 367 Bradford Street (1910): 
Hours: — Week days from 10 A. M. to 4 P. M.; Thursdays from 8 to 9 P. M. Physi- 
cian in Charge : — Dr. J. L. Baker. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT MAIN TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, Fleet and WiUough- 

by Streets (1906): 
Hours: — Week days from 10 A. M. to 4 P. M.; Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8 to 9 
P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. L. Baker. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT QUEENS TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 10 Union Ave- 
nue, Jamaica (1910): 
Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
—Dr. J. L. Baker. 

108 



DISPENSARIES NEW YORK 

LONG ISLAND COLLEGE HOSPITAL DISPENSARY, Henry and Amity Streets 

(April, 1910): 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 10 to 11 A. M. Physician in 
Charge:— Dr. H. E. Brown. 

NORTHERN CLASS OF THE BROOKLYN COMMITTEE ON THE PREVEN- 
TION OF TUBERCULOSIS, 255 Division Avenue (May i, 1908): 
Hours: — Once every two weeks. Director: — Miss Emma L. Pond, R. N. Secre- 
tary : — ^James Jenkins, Jr., 69 Schermerhom Street. 

NIAGARA FALLS 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE NIAGARA FALLS COMMITTEE 
FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS, 44 Falls Street (February 
17, 1910): 
Hours : — Mondays from 4 to 6 P. M. for men, Thursdays from 4 to 6 P. M. for women. 
Physicians in Charge:— Drs. Carl G. Leo-Wolf and F. B. Horton. 

OLEAN 

OLEAN TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (September i, 1910): 

Hours: — Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays at i P. M. Chairman of Dispensary 

Committee: — Dr. Walter A. Cowell, 140 North Barry Street. Note: — This dispensary 

does not have any headquarters, fourteen physicians serving in turn and treating patients at 

their own ofBces at the hours specified above. 

ROCHESTER 

CHILDREN'S DISPENSARY OF THE ROCHESTER PUBLIC HEALTH AS- 
SOCIATION (1898): 
Hours : — Week days from 9 A. M. to 5.30 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Mont- 
gomery E. Leary. There are twelve other physicians in attendance. 

HEALTH BUREAU CLINIC FOR DISEASES OF THE LUNGS (January, 1908): 
Hours: — Three days a week from 3 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. G. W. 
Goler. 

ROME 

ROME DISPENSARY FOR PULMONARY DISEASES, 206 North James Street 

(April 30, 1908): 
Conducted by the Board of Health. Hours: — Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays 
from 12 M. to I P. M. and 8 to 9 P. M. Health Officer:— Dr. Charles R. Mahady. 

SCHENECTADY 

MUNICIPAL DISPENSARY FOR TUBERCULOSIS, CITY HALL ANNEX, 

(June 23, 1908): 
Conducted by the Health and Charities Departments of the City of Schenectady. 
Hours : — Tuesdays and Fridays from 3 to 4 P. M. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. Charles 
F. Clowe, Health Officer, Peter McPartlon, L. A. Gould, and N. A. Pashayan. 

STAPLETON (See New York, Boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx and 
Richmond) 

SYRACUSE 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE CITY OF SYRACUSE, 508 E. Fayette Street 
(April I, 1908): 

Conducted by the Bureau of Health. Hours: — Sundays from 3 to 4.30 P. M.; 
Mondays and Thursdays from 2.30 to 4.30 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. H. B. Doust, 
assisted by Dr. F. H. Knoff. 

109 



DISPENSARIES NEW YORK, NORTH CAROLINA 

TROY 

TUBERCULOSIS RELIEF STATION, 518 Second Avenue (1909): 
Conducted by the Troy Tuberculosis Relief Committee. Hours :— Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays at 8 P. M. Physician in Charge :— Dr. H. W. Carey. 

TUBERCULOSIS RELIEF STATION, 2 HiU Street (May 20, 1908): 
Conducted bv the Troy Tuberculosis Relief Committee. Hours :— Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays 'from 8 to 9 P. ]\I. Physician in Charge :— Dr. H. W. Carey. 

UTICA 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE UTICA FREE DISPENSARY, 124 Mary 
Street (November i, 1909): 

Hours :— Tuesdays and Fridays from 8.30 to lo A. M. Physician in Charge:— Dr. 
Florence I. Staunton. 

WATERTOWN 

WATERTOWN FREE TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 162 Stone Street (Feb- 
ruary I, 1910): 

Conducted by the City and the Watertown Tuberculosis Committee. Hours: — Tues- 
days and Fridays from i to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge :— Dr. Florence A. Sherman. 

WATERVLIET 

THE WATERVLIET TUBERCULOSIS RELIEF STATION, 1560 Broadway 
(November 15, 19 10): 

Hours :— Tuesdays and Fridays from 8 to 9.30 P. M. Chairman Dispensary Com- 
mittee : — Dr. John W. Burns. 

YONKERS 

YONKERS TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (December 29, 1906): 

Conducted by the Sanitary League of Yonkers. Hours: — Week days from 12 M. to i 

P. M., and from 8 to 9 P. M., on three evenings a week. Registrar:— Dr. W. H. Vermilye. 

There are thirteen others in attendance. 



NORTH CAROLINA 

CHARLOTTE 

NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL COLLEGE, TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 

Corner 6th and Church Streets (October, 19 10): 
Hours:— Week days from 11 A.M. to 12.30 P. M. Physician in Charge:— Dr. 
John Q. Myers. 

WINSTON-SALEM 

FREE TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (December 15, 1910): 
Conducted by the Anti-Tuberculosis Committee of Winston-Salem. Hours:— Tues- 
days and Saturdays from 4 to 6 P. M. Physician in Charge :— Dr. W. M. Johnson. 



DISPENSARIES OHIO 

OHIO 



CANTON 

DISPENSARY OF THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF CANTON (No- 
vember 2, I9I0): 

Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 3 to 4 P. M. Physicians in Charge : 
— Drs. Charles Lament, T. C. Siffert, W. H. Weaver, L. A. Buchman, H. H. Bowman, and 
D. F. Banker. 

CINCINNATI 

CINCINNATI TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 209 West 12th Street (September 
1,1907): 

Conducted jointly by the Board of Health and the Cincinnati Anti-Tuberculosis League. 
Hours : — Week days from 1 2 M. to 2 P. M.; Mondays from 7 to 8 P. M. Physician in Charge : 
—Dr. J. L. Tuchter. 

CLEVELAND 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF CLEVELAND, Corner St. Clair and East 
9th Streets (October 6, 1904): 

Conducted by the Anti-Tuberculosis League of Cleveland in co-operation with Western 
Reserve University and the Visiting Nurse Association. Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays, 
Fridays and Saturdays from i to 2.30 P. M. and Thursdays from 6 to 7.30 P. M.; Saturday 
for children only. Secretary: — Dr. R. H. Bishop, Jr. Medical Director: — Dr. J. H. 
Lowman. 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, Detroit 

Avenue and West 29th Street (September 15, 1910): 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from i to 2.30 P. M. Phy- 
sician in Charge : — Dr. Orville C. Witter. 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, 502 Central 

Avenue (August, 1910): 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from i to 2.30 P. M.; Thurs- 
days from 6.30 to 7.30 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. J. C. Placak. 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, Comer 

Detroit and West 29th Streets (November, 1910): 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from i to 2.30 P. M.; Thurs- 
days from 6.30 to 7.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. O. C. Witter. 

COLUMBUS 

COLUMBUS FREE DISPENSARY, 34 East Rich Street (January 29, 1906) : 
Conducted by the Columbus Society for the Prevention and Cure of Tuberculosis. 
Hours: — Saturdays from 10 to 11 A. M.; Mondays and Thursdays from 4 to 6 P. M. Ex- 
amining Physician :— Dr. E. A. Harper. Medical Director: — Dr. C. O. Probst. 

TOLEDO 

THALIAN TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (September, 1907): 
Conducted by The Thahan Anti-Tuberculosis Society. Hours: — Thursday mornings. 
Physician in Charge : — Dr. R. P. Daniells. 



DISPENSARIES OREGON, PENNSYLVANIA 

YOUNGSTOWN 

YOUNGSTOWN TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (April 26, 1910): 

Conducted by the Anti-Tuberculosis Association. Hours: — Tuesdays and Fridays 

from 4 to 5 P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. C. R. Clark, H. E. Welch and W. J. 

Whelen. 



OREGON 
PORTLAND 

PORTLAND FREE DISPENSARY, People's Institute (JSIarch 11, 1910): 
Conducted by the University of Oregon, The People's Institute and the Visiting Nurse 

Association. Hours: — Tuesdays and Fridays from 2 to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: 

—Dr. Ray M. Matson. 



PENNSYLVANIA 



ALLENTOWN (Lehigh County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 51 (February 28, 1908): 
Hours: — Three days a week from 3 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. M. F. 

Cawley, assisted by three other physicians. There is one visiting nurse in connection with 

the dispensary. 

ALTOONA (Blair County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 14 (December 10, 1907) : 

Hours : — Two days a week at 2 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Joseph D. Findley, 

assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BANGOR (Northampton County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 87 (December 4, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. S. 
Sherrer. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BEAVER FALLS (Beaver County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 103 (December 18, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Bruce 
Snodgrass. There is one visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BELLEFONTE (Centre County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 7 (November 5, 1907): 
Hours: — One day a week from 10.30 A. M. to 12.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — 
Dr. G. F. Harris. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BERWICK (Columbia County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 16 (November 5, 1907): 
Hours: — One day a week from 8 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. S. B. 
Arment. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

BLOOMSBURG (Columbia County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 93 (September 30, iqo8) : 
Hours: — One day a week from 8 to 11 A. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. S. B. 
Arment. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BRADDOCK (AUegheny County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. loi (March 27, 1909): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. F. K. 
Whitfield. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BRADFORD (McKean County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 38 (February 14, 1908): 
Hours : — By appointment. Physician in Charge : — Dr. W. Clyde Hogan. 

BRISTOL (Bucks County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 82 (November 24, 1908) : 
Hours : — One day a week from 1 1 A. M. to 1 2 M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. J. de B. 
Abbott. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BROOKVILLE (Jefferson County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 102 (December 4, 1908) : 
Hours: — One day a week from 3 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. A. Haven. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BROWNSVILLE (Fayette County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 114 (May 5, 1910): 
Hours: — One day a week from 3 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. L. N. 
Reichard. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

BUTLER (Butler County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 15 (November 15, 1907) : 
Hours: — Two days a week from 10 A. M. to 12 M. and i to 4.30 P. M. Physician 

in Charge: — Dr. H. D. Hockenberry, assisted by two other physicians. There is a visiting 

nurse in connection mth the dispensary. 

CARLISLE (Cumberland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 4 (October 25, 1907): 
Hours: — ^Two days a week from 12 M. to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. B. 

Bashore, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

CARNEGIE (Allegheny County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 83 (December 3, 1908) : 
Hours : — One day a week from 3 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. F. E. Harriott. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

CHAMBERSBURG (Franklin County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 11 (November 10, 1907) : 
Hours: — One day a week from i to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. X. 
Bonebrake. There is a visiting nurse in coimection with the dispensary. 

CHESTER (Delaware County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 12 (November 12, 1907): 
Hours : — Five days a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. H. M. 

8 113 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

Hiller, assisted by two other physicians. There are three visiting nurses in connection with the 
dispensary. 

CLARION (Clarion County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 43 (January 21, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from i to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. S. Reiner. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

CLEARFIELD (Clearfield County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 62 (May 7, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 10.30 A.M. to 12.30 P.M. Physician in Charge: — 
Dr. S. C. Stewart. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

COATESVILLE (Chester County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 75 (November 17, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. E. A. 
Graves. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

COLUMBIA (Lancaster County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 74 (November 26, 1908) : 
Hours : — One day a week from 3 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. J. P. Kennedy. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

CONNELLSVILLE (Fayette County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO, 70 (November 23, 1908) : 
Hours: — One day a week from 9 A. M to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. T. B. 

Echard. There is a visiting mu-se in cormection with the dispensary. 

CORRY (Erie County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 99 (December 4, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from i to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. C. B. Kibler. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

COUDERSPORT (Potter County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 27 (February 24, 1908): 
Hours : — One day a week from i to 3 P. M. 

DANVILLE (Montour County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 28 (December 14, 1907): 
Hours : — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. George 
A. Stock. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

DOYLESTOWN (Bucks County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 23 (May 30, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. I. S. Plymire. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

DUBOIS (Clearfield County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 95 (December 5, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. R. R. 

Jordan. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

114 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

DUSHORE (Sullivan County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 59 (April 8, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. P. G. 
Biddle. 

EASTON (Northampton County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 52 (April 28, 1908): 
Hours: — Three days a week from 3 to 5 P.M.; Wednesdays from 7.30 to 9 P.M. 

Physician in Charge: — Dr. E. M. Green, assisted by six other physicians. There is a 

visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

EMPORIUM (Cameron County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 8 (October 5, 1907): 
Hours:— One day a week from i to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. S. Falk. 

ERIE (Erie County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 3 (December 10, 1907): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 3 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge:— Dr. J. W. 

Wright, assisted by one other physician. There are two visiting nurses in connection with 

the dispensary. 

EVERETT (Bedford County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 61 (April 14, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from i to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. de 
la M. Hill. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

FRANKFORD (Philadelphia County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 107 (April 26, 1909): 
Hours: — Three days a week from 11 A. M.,,to i P. M. Physician in Charge :^Dr. 
W. G. Turmbull, assisted by two other physicians. There are two visiting nurses in con- 
nection with the dispensary. 

FRANKLIN (Venango County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 72 (November 11, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from i to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. F. Mc- 
Dowell. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

GETTYSBURG (Adams County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 60 (May 19, 1908): 
Hours : — Tuesdays from 10 A. M. to 1 2 M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. J. R. Dickson. 

GREENSBURG (Westmoreland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 57: 

Hours : — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. I. M. 

Portser. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

HANOVER (York County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 86 (December 4, 1908): 
Hours:— Two days a week from 2 to 4.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. H. 

Bittinger, assisted by one other physician. There are two visiting nurses in connection 

with the dispensary. 

I IS 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

HARRISBURG (Dauphin County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 13 (March 28, 1908): 
Hours: — Week days from i to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Paul A. Hartman, 

assisted by eight other physicians. There are seven visiting nurses in connection with the 

dispensarj'. 

HASTINGS (Cambria County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 69 (November 24, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 10 A.M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. D. 

S. Rice, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

HAZLETON (Luzeme County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 68 (November 3, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from i to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. C. 

Gayley, assisted by two other physicians. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

HOMESTEAD (AUegheny County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 100 (December 12, 1908): 
Hours:— One day a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. A. P. 

Fogelman. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

HONESDALE (Wayne County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 18 (January 3, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. B. Ely. 

There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

HUNTINGDON (Huntingdon County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 47 (April 3, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 1.30 to 3.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 
H. C. Frontz. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

INDIANA (Indiana County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 48 (February j6, 1908): 
Hours:— One day a week from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. A. 

Simpson. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

JENKINTOWN (Montgomery County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 73 (November 14, 1908) : 
Hours: — One day a week from i to 2 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. B. 
Jameson. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

JOHNSTOWN (Cambria County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 9 (November 26, 1907): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. E. 

Matthews, assisted by three other physicians. There are two visiting nurses in connection 

with the dispensary. 

KANE (McKean County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 115 (June 15, 1910): 
Hours : — One day a week from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : — l3r. M. J. Sweeney. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

ii6 



DISPENSARIES PENNSLYVANIA 

KITTANNING (Armstrong County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 24 (November 5, 1907): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. T. N. 

McKee, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

LANCASTER (Lancaster County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 39 (January 3, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 3 to 5 P. M.; Saturdays from 8.30 to 9.30 P. M. 

Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. L. Mowery, assisted by two other physicians. There are 

two visiting nurses in connection with the dispensary. 

LANSFORD (Carbon County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PIEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 89 (December 2, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 3 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. G. P. Hill. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

LEBANON (Lebanon County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 5 (December 21, 1907): 
Hours : — Three days a week from 9 A. M. to 1 2 M. ; Saturdays from 2 to 5 P. M. Physi- 
cian in Charge: — Dr. A. J. Riegel, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting 
nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

LEWISTOWN (Mifflin County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 10 (February 18, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 11 A.M. to i P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 
C. H. Brisbin. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

LOCK HAVEN (Clinton County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 46 (May 14, 1908): 
Hours : — One day a week from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. R. B. Watson 
assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

LYKENS (Dauphin County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 78 (November 25, 1908) : 
Hours : — One day a week from i to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. M. D. Lehr. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

McCONNELLSBURG (Fulton County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 17 (December 10, 1907): 
Hours : — By appointment. Physician in Charge : — Dr. J. W. Mosser. 

McKEESPORT (Allegheny County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 81 (December 2, 190S): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. D. P. 

Blose, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

MAUCH CHUNK (Carbon County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 45 (March 20, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge : — ^Dr. E. G. 
Bray. There is a visiting nurse in coimection with the dispensary. 

117 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYI.VANIA 

MEADVILLE (Crawford County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 41 (February 13, 1908): 
Hours: — Two daj's a week from 3 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. K. 

Roberts, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

MEYERSDALE (Somerset County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 30 (December 4, IQ07): 
Hours:— One day a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. C. P. Large. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

MIFFLINSBURG (Union County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 29 (January 4, iqoS): 
Hours: — One day a week from 12 M. to i P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. C. H. 

Dimm. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

MIFFLINTOWN (Juniata County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 26 (December 17, 1007): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. H. 

Banks, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

MILFORD (Pike County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 19 (December 6, 1907): 
Hours : — By appointment. Physician in Charge : — Dr. VV. B. Kenworthey. 

MILTON (Northumberland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 92 (December i, 190S): 
Hours : — Two days a week from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. R. B. Tule. 

There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

MONESSEN (Westmoreland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 88 (December 7, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge:— Dr. M. J. 

Cramer. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

MONONGAHELA CITY (Washington County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 55 (February 20, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. C. B. Wood. 
There is one visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

MONTROSE (Susquehanna County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 49 (March 27, 1908): 
Hours : — By appointment. Physician in Charge : — Dr. J. G. Wilson. There is a visit- 

ng nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

MT. CARMEL (Northumberland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 71 (December 2, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from i to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. T. 

Williams, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

118 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

MT. PLEASANT (Westmoreland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 77 (November 20, 1908) : 
Hours: — One day a week from 3 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. M. W. 

Homer. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

NANTICOKE (Luzerne County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 113 (January 21, 1910): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. C. E. 

Bennett. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

NEW BLOOMFIELD (Perry County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 25 (January 9, 1908): 
Hours: — By appointment. Physician in Charge: — Dr. A. R. Johnston. 

NEW CASTLE (Lawrence County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 35 (January 24, 1908): 
Hours :■ — Tluree days a week from 8 A. M. to 1 2 M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. J. D. 

Moore, assisted by two other physicians. There is one visiting nurse in connection with 

the dispensary. 

NORRISTOWN (Montgomery County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 31 (January 13, 1908): 
Hours : — Two days a week from 2.30 to 4.30 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. H. H. 

Whitcomb, assisted by four other physicians. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

OIL CITY (Venango County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 32 (December 13, 1907) : 
Hours: — Two days a week from 12.30 to 2 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. 

P. Strayer. There are two visiting nurses in connection with the dispensary. 

PHILADELPHL/l 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 21 (January 7, 1908): 
Hours: — Week days from 11 A.M. to i P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. A. P. 

Francine, assisted by eleven other physicians. There are four visiting nurses in connection 
with the dispensary. 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE 

HOSPITAL, Sansom and Tenth Streets (March, 1908) : 
Hours: — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at i P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 
Archibald H. Graham. 

JEWISH CONSUMPTIVE INSTITUTE OF PHILADELPHIA FOR THE STUDY, 
TREATMENT, AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (September 11, 
19 10): 

Hours: — Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 12 M. to 2 
P. M.; Mondays and Fridays at 3 P. M. for nose and throat. Physicians in Charge: — 
Drs. Solomon Soils Cohen and Max Sholler. 

KENSINGTON DISPENSARY FOR THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS, 

Hancock Street and Susquehanna Avenue (March 29, 1906; Incorporated, October 

15, 1907): 

Hours: — Week daj'^s from 12 M. to 3 P. M.; Children's Clinic Tuesdays and Thursdays 

at 4 P. M.; Evening Chnic Thursdays and Fridays at 8 P. M. Sister in Charge: — Sister 

Maria Roeck. Medical Director: — Dr. J. Willoughby Irwin. A staff of seventy-foiu- 

physicians, a dentist and a pharmacist are connected with the institution. 

119 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, LEBANON HOSPITAL, 459 West 4th Street 

(January 15, 1909): 
Hours : — Week days from 4 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. A. Reiss, 910 West 
Franklin Street. 

THE MATILDA H. LOEB DISPENSARY OF THE JEWISH HOSPITAL OF 

PHILADELPHIA, DISEASES OF THE LUNG (July, 1907): 
Conducted by the Jewish Hospital Association. Hours: — Mondays from 4 to 6 P. M. 
Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. B. Fetterman, Jr. 

DISPENSARY OF THE HENRY PHIPPS INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY, 
TREATMENT, AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS, 238 Pine Street 
(February i, 1903): 

Hours: — Week days from 8.30 to 10 A. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. R. M. 
Landis. Director: — Alexander M. Wilson. 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL, TUBERCULOSIS CLASS (November 11, 1907): 
Hours: — Two days a week. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Frank A. Craig. 

DISPENSARY OF THE RUSH HOSPITAL FOR THE TREATMENT OF CON- 
SUMPTION AND ALLIED DISEASES: 
Hours: — Week days from 2.30 to 3.30 P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. S. 
Solis Cohen, T. M. Tyson, J. D. McLean, Ross H. Skillem, and Henry P. Jump. 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE DISPENSARY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITAL: 
Hours : — Week days from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Fred H. Klaer. 

PHILIPSBURG (Center County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 80 (December i, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. C. E. Mc- 
Girk. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

PHOENIXVILLE (Chester County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 76 (December 2, 1908): 
Hours : — One day a week from 2 to 4 P. M. There is a visiting nurse in connection with 
the dispensary. 

PITTSBURG (AUegheny County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 20 (January 21, 1908): 
Hours: — Week days from 3 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. S. M. Rinehart, 

assisted by nine other physicians. There are seven visiting nurses in connection with the 

dispensary. 

DISPENSARY OF THE TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF PITTSBURG, 2851 

Bedford Avenue (February, 1907): 
Conducted by the Dispensary Aid Society of The Tuberculosis League. Hours : — Week 
days from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. William Charles White. 

PITTSTON (Luzerne County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 94 (December 10, 1908): 
Hours:— Two days a week from 3 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge:— Dr. S. L. 

Underwood, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

POTTSTOWN (Montgomery County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. io6 (December i8, 1908): 
Hours :— One day a week from i to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge :— Dr. T. E. Wills. 
There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

POTTSVILLE (Schuylkill County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 66 (April 28, 1908): 
Hours: — Three days a week from 2 to 4.30 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. L. T. 

Kennedy, assisted by two other physicians. There are two visiting nurses in connection 
with the dispensary. 

PUNXSUTAWNEY (Jefferson County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO, 64 (May 11, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 11 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. E. 
Grube. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

READING (Berks County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 37 (January 15, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 3 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge:— Dr. Israel 

Cleaver, assisted by three other physicians. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

RENOVO (Clinton County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 112 (December 20, 
1909): 

Hours: — One day a week from 2 to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. C. L. Full- 
mer. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

RIDGWAY (Elk County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 42 (January 21, 1908): 

Hours: — Tuesdays from 11 A. M. to 12 M.; and Fridays from 3 to 4 P. M. Physician 

in Charge : — Dr. J. G. Flynn. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

ROCHESTER (Beaver County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 22 (January 24, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 3 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. B. 
Snodgrass. There is one muse in connection with the dispensary. 

SCRANTON (Lackawanna County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 40 (February 25, 1908): 
Hours: — Open three days a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. C. 

Reifsnyder, assisted by two other physicians. There are two visiting nurses in connection 

with the dispensary. 

SELINGSGROVE (Snyder County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 50 (February 4, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 9 to 11 A.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. F. J. 

Wagenseller, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with 
the dispensary. 

SHAMOKIN (Northumberland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 53 (March 10, 1908): 
Hours : — Two days a week from 10 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. R. H. 

Sinunons, assisted by two other physicians. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

SHARON (Mercer County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 36 (February 18, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 10 A.M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 

P. P. Fisher. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

SHENANDOAH (Schuylkill County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 85 (December 2, 1908): 
Hours: — Five days a week from S to 10 A. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. M. 

Wasley, assisted by one other phj'sician. There are two visiting nurses in connection with 

tlie dispensary. 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM (Northampton County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 98 (December 3, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 3 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. L. 

Estes, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the 

dispensary. 

STROUDSBURG (Monroe County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 65 (April 16, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 2 to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. L. 

Angle. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

SUNBURY (Northumberland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. no (July 2, 1909): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. B. 

Cressinger. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

SUSQUEHANNA (Susquehanna County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 97 (December 4, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Samuel 

Birdsall. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

TAMAQUA (Schuylkill County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 91 (December 4, 1908) : 
Hours: — Two days a week from 3 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. E. E. 

Shifferstine. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

TARENTUM (Allegheny County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. in (August 12, 1909): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. A. 

Arnold. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

TIOGA (Tioga County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 58 (February 23, 1908): 
Hours:— One day a week from 12 M. to i P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. S. P. 

Hakes. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

TIONESTA (Forest County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 34 December 20, 1907) : 
Hours:— One day a week from 9 to 10 A.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. F. J. 
Bovard. 



DISPENSARIES PENNSYLVANIA 

TITUSVILLE (Crawford County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 90 (December 4, igoS): 
Hours: — One day a week from 11 A. M to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. C. E. 

Spicer. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

TOWANDA (Bradford County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 44 (January 20, 190S): 
Hours: — By appointment. Physician in Charge: — Dr. T. B. Johnson, Jr. 

TUNKHANNOCK (Wyoming County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 56 (January 24, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from i to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. H. L. Mc- 

Kown. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

TYRONE (Blair County) 

ST ,TE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 79 (December 2, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 3 to 4 P. INI. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. S. 

Musser. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

UNIONTOWN (Fayette County) 

TATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 67 (May 30, 1908): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 12.30 to 1.30 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 

O. R. Altman. There is one visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

WARREN (Warren County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 54 (March 14, 190S): 
Hours: — One day a week from 5 to 6 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. M. V. 

Ball. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

WASHINGTON (Washington County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 105 (April 6, 1909): 
Hours: — Tliree days a week from i to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. E. M. 
Hazlett. There are two visiting nurses in connection with the dispensary. 

WAYNESBORO (Franklin County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 108 (April 30, 1909): 
Hours: — Two days a week from i to 3 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. C. 

Schultz. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

WAYNESBURG (Greene County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 63 (March 12, 190S): 
Hours:— One day a week from i to 3 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. T. lams. 

There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

WELLSBORO (Tioga County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 104 (December 6, 1908): 
Hours: — One day a week from 3 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge :^Dr. P. W. 
Houser. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

WEST CHESTER (Chester County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 6 (December 5, 1907): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Joseph 

Scattergood, assisted by one other physician. There is a visiting nurse in connection with 

the dispensary. 

123 



DISPENSARIES PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, PORTO RICO 

WEST FAIRVIEW (Cumberland County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 96 (September 30, 190S) : 
Hours : — One day a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. H. B. Bashore. 

There is a Nnsiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

WILKES-BARRE (Luzerne County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 1 (July 22, 1907): 
Hours: — Week days from 3 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Charles H. 

Miner, assisted by si.\ other physicians. There are si.x visiting nurses in connection with 

the dispensary. 

WILKINSBURG (AUegheny County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 109 (July 15. 1909): 
Hours: — Two days a week from 2 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. M. 

McNall. There is a visiting nurse in connection with the dispensary. 

WILLIAMSPORT (Lycoming County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 33 (February 22, 190S): 
Hours: — Two daj^s a week from 10 A.M. to 2 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. 
C. W. Youngman, assisted by one other physician. There are two visiting nurses in connec- 
tion with the dispensary. 

YORK (York County) 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH DISPENSARY NO. 2 (November 12, 1907): 
Hours: — Week days from 3 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. S. Miller, 

assisted by nine other physicians. There are three visiting nurses in connection with the 

dispensary. 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 



MANILA 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF THE BUREAU OF HEALTH (April i, 1910): 
Hours: — Week days from 8 A. M. to 12 M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. W. E. Mus- 
grave. Director of Health: — Dr. Victor G. Reiser. 



PORTO RICO 



STATE DISPENSARIES 

By act of the Legislative Assembly in 1909, seven tuberculosis dispensaries were estab- 
Ushed, one in each of the following cities: San Juan, Ponce, Mayaguez, Arecibo, Humaca.o, 
Guayama, and Aguadilla. The act provided for a nurse to be in attendance at each dis- 
pensary and also placed the management of the dispensaries under the Anemia Dispensary 
Service. 



124 



DISPENSARIES RHODE ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA, TENNESSEE 

RHODE ISLAND 
PAWTUCKET 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE SAYLES-MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (De- 
cember, 1908): 
Hours: — Mondays from 4 to 5 P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. George B. Mc- 
Graw and A. H. Merdinyan. 

TUBERCULOSIS CLASS OF THE PAWTUCKET SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF 

AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS, Memorial Hospital (March, 1911): 
Hours :— Thursdays at 3.30 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. James S. Wheaton, Jr. 

PROVIDENCE 

NIGHT TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, 151 Fountain Street (January 20, 1911): 
Conducted by the Providence League for the Suppression of Tuberculosis. Hours : — 

Fridays from 8 to 9 P. M. Physicians in Charge: — Drs. Jay Perkins and Pearl 

Williams. 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS, RHODE 

ISLAND HOSPITAL (July i, 1900): 
Conducted by the Rhode Island Hospital. Hours: — Three days a week at 9 A. M.; 
Saturday for children. Physicians in Charge : — Drs. Jay Perkins and Pearl Williams. 

RIVERPOINT 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC OF THE VISITING NURSE AND ANTI-TUBER- 
CULOSIS ASSOCIATION OF THE PAWTUXET VALLEY (January i, 1910): 
Hours: — Saturdays from 3 to 4.30 P. M. Nurse in Charge: — Miss Mary Van Zyle. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



CHARLESTON 

SOUTH CAROLINA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE'S DISPENSARY FOR 
THE TREATMENT OF CONSUMPTION, Shirras Dispensary, 72 Society 

Street (January 25, 1909): 
Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 4.30 to 5.30 P. M. Physicians 
in Charge: — -Dr. John L. Dawson, assisted by Drs. J. C. Sosnowski, F. B. Johnson and R. 
M. Pollitzer. 



TENNESSEE 



NASHVILLE 

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE DISPENSARY FOR TUBERCULOSIS, 614 

Broadway (April i, 191 1): 
Hours: — Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays from 10 to 11 A. M. Physicians in 
Charge :— Drs. W. A. Oughterson, C. E. Brush, and W. E. McCampbell. 

I2S 



DISPENSARIES TEXAS, VIRGINIA, WASHINGTON 

TEXAS 

EL PASO 

EL PASO COUNTY DISPENSARY (By EI Paso Health League, July, 1909; taken 

over by county, September, 1910): 
Conducted by El Paso County. Hours: — Week days from 12 M. to i P. M. Physi- 
cian in Charge: — Dr. Charles M. Hendricks. 



VIRGINIA 

LYNCHBURG 

HEALTH LEAGUE TUBERCULOSIS CLASS, 1107 Church Street (February i, 

1910): 
Hours: — Fridays from 4 to 5 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Geo. P. Hamner. 

NORFOLK 

CLINIC FOR CONSUMPTIVES, 90 Charlotte Street (April, 1906): 
Conducted by the Anti-Tuberculosis League of Norfolk. Hours: — Four days a week 
from 2.30 to 4 P. M. Physician in Charge : — Dr. Charles R. Grandy. 

RICHMOND 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY FOR WHITE PATIENTS OF THE BOARD 

OF HEALTH, 1420 East FrankUn Street (1907): 
Hours: — Week days from 12 M. to i P. M. except Saturday. Physician in Charge:— 
Dr. Giles B. Cook. Medical Director:— Dr. E. C. Levy, Chief Health Officer. 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY FOR COLORED PATIENTS OF THE BOARD 
OF HEALTH, 412 N. 3rd Street (November, 1907): 

Hours : — Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 12 M. to i P. M. 
Physician in Charge: — Dr. S. B. Moon. Medical Director: — Dr. E. C. Levy, Chief 
Health Officer. 



WASHINGTON 



SEATTLE 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OF THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE 

OF KING COUNTY, 4th Avenue and University Street (August 16, 1910): 
Hours: — Week days at i P. M. Medical Director: — Dr. Robert M. Stith. Assis- 
tant Secretary: — William K. McKibben. 



126 



DISPENSARIES WEST VIRGINIA, WISCONSIN 

WEST VIRGINIA 
CHARLESTON 

DISPENSARY OF ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF KANAWIIA COUNTY, 

Frankenberger Building, Corner Kanawha and Summer Streets (September i, 
1909): 
Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays from 2 to 5 P. M. Physicians in 
Charge: — Drs. B. S. Preston, Irene Bullard and Charles O. Grady. 

WHEELING 

WHEELING TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY, 1413 Chapline Street (May 17, 1910): 
Hours: — Tuesdays and Saturdays from 3.30 to 6 P.M. Physicians in Charge: — 
Drs. J. E. Burns and Thurman Gillespy. 

WISCONSIN 



MADISON 

MADISON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION CLINIC, City Hall (1910): 
Hours: — Saturdays from 4 to 6 P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. T. W. Tormey. 

MILWAUKEE 

FREE DISPENSARY FOR TUBERCULOSIS OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSI- 
CIANS AND SURGEONS, 319 Reservoir Avenue (January i, 1910): 

Conducted in co-operation with the Milwaukee Society for the Care of the Sick. Hours : 
— Mondays from 9 to 11 A. M.; Wednesdays from 7 to 9 P. M. Physician in Charge: — 
Dr. R. Ernst. 

MARQUETTE COLLEGE FREE DISPENSARY FOR TUBERCULOSIS, 9th and 

Wells Streets (March, 1910): 
Conducted in co-operation with the Milwaukee Society for the Care of the Sick. Hours : 
—Tuesdays from 7.30 to 8.30 P. M.; Thursdays from 3.30 to 5 P. M. Physician in 
Charge: — Dr. William G. Weideman. Chief-of-staff : — Dr. WiUiam H. Washburn. 

ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC (1911) (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 

The Milwaukee Society for the Care of the Sick will open a dispensary at St. Mary's 
Hospital in 191 1. 

SOUTH SIDE DISPENSARY FOR TUBERCULOSIS, 331 Grove Street (April 27, 
1908) : 

Conducted by the Milwaukee Society for the Care of the Sick. Hours :^Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays from 3.30 to 5 P. M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Robert 
C. Brown. Chief-of-staff :— Dr. WilHam H. Washburn. 

WAUSAU 

ST. JOHN'S INFIRMARY TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY (January, 1911): 
Superintendent: — Rev. William Everet Johnson. 



127 



Open Air Schools and Classes for 

Children 

in the 

United States 



open Air Schools and Classes for 
Children 



in the 
United States 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

The rapid growth within the last two years of the open air school movement, 
and the close alliance of the movement with the anti-tuberculosis campaign 
has made it necessary to list these institutions in a separate section. While 
many of the schools do not treat positively tuberculous children and some are 
for normal as well as sub-normal pupils, it has been decided, nevertheless, to 
list these classes as anti-tuberculosis agencies, both because of the fact that their 
work is mainly preventive in character, and also because there is at the present 
time no other directory listing open air schools. In addition to the facts con- 
cerning the location, date and officials, the per capita per diem cost of main- 
tenance or of food has been included where this was obtainable. 



CALIFORNIA 

MONROVIA 

HELIOTROPE OPEN AIR SCHOOL (191 1) (not yet in operation) : 

The school authorities are erecting a new building which will be given over entirely to 
open air classes. Medical Director: — Dr. C. C. Browning. 

OAKLAND 

FRUITVALE SCHOOL NO. 2 (August, 1910): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 25. 
Medical Director: — Dr. N. K. Foster. Principal: — W. D. Spencer. Supported entirely 
by City School Department. 

COLORADO 
COLORADO SPRINGS (not yet in operation) 

Definite provision has been made for an open air school, but the details of construction 

131 



OPEN AIR SCHOOLS CONNECTICUT, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, ILLINOIS 

and administration have not yet been perfected. Superintendent of Schools: — Carlos 
M. Cole. 

DENVER (not yet in operation) 

The Board of Education has authorized plans for four open air school rooms in new 
buildings or additions to buildings to be erected in 1911. Superintendent of Schools: — 
C. E. Chadsey. 



CONNECTICUT 



HARTFORD 

HARTFORD OUTDOOR SCHOOL (July 6, 1909): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 25. 
Medical Directors: — Drs. Henry F. StoU and E. B. Hooker. Supported by the Board of 
Education and the Hartford Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis. 

SOUTH MANCHESTER 

SOUTH MANCHESTER OPEN AIR SCHOOL (January 25, 191 1): 
For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 20. Medical Director: — Dr. 
Thomas Sloan. Supported jointly by School Board and private subscriptions. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
WASHINGTON 

FRESH AIR CLASS, BLAKE SCHOOL, North Capitol Street (September i, 1910): 

For the entire Fourth Grade of Blake School. Capacity: — 35. Medical Director: — 

Dr. William C. Woodward. Teacher: — Miss Sue Gardner. Supported by Board of 

Education and the Association for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, who furnish food, clothing, 

etc. 



ILLINOIS 
CHICAGO 

On August 3, 1909, the Chicago Tuberculosis Institute opened the first open air school 
in Chicago, which was conducted for one month with marked success. Since that time, the 
Institute has conducted several such schools during the summer months. 

THE ELIZABETH McCORMICK OPEN AIR SCHOOL NO. i, 818 Ewing Street 
(September, 1909): 

For children with tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 40. Medical 
Director: — Dr. James A. Britton. Teacher: — Miss Alice Bunker. Supported jointly 
by the Board of Education and the Elizabeth McCormick Memorial Fund, under the direction 
of Sherman C. Kingsley, General Superintendent of the United Charities of Chicago. 

ELIZABETH McCORMICK OPEN AIR SCHOOL NO. 2, 1153 Gault Court (Feb- 
ruary, 191 i): 
For children with tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity : — 25. Teacher : 
— Miss Marian S. Wallace. Medical Director: — Dr. O. W. McMichael. Supported 

132 



OPEN AIR SCHOOLS [LOUISIANA, MASSACHUSETTS 

jointly by the Board of Education and the Elizabeth McCormick Memorial Fund, under 
the direction of Sherman C. Kingsley, General Superintendent of the United Charities of 
Chicago. 

GRAHAM OPEN WINDOW SCHOOL: 

This is not a school for sickly children but a school for normal children, in twenty rooms 
of which all the windows are kept open throughout the entire school year. The experiment 
was begun in September, 1909, and has been under the supervision of Dr. William E. Watt, 
the principal of the school. 

FRANKLIN OPEN WINDOW ROOM, Goethe Street, between Wells and Sedgwick 
(February, 1911): 

For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 20. Principal: — Miss Etta Q. 
Gee. Medical Director: — Dr. O. W. McMichael. Supported jointly by the Board of 
Education and the Elizabeth McCormick Memorial Fund, under the direction of Sherman C. 
Kingsley, General Superintendent of the United Charities of Chicago. 

HAMLINE OPEN WINDOWjtROOM, 48th and Bishop Streets (January 1911): 
For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 20. Medical Inspection: — 

Only by school physician. Supported by Board of Education and Public School Extension 

Committee of Chicago Women's Club. 

MOSELY OPEN WINDOW [ROOM, 24th Street and Michigan Avenue (January, 
191 i): 

For anaemic children. Capacity: — 30. Principal: — John A. Long. Medical Di- 
rector: — Dr. H. O. Jones. Supported jointly by the Board of Education and the Public 
School Extension Committee of the Chicago Women's Club. 



LOUISIANA 



NEW ORLEANS 

McDONAGH SCHOOL NO. 9 (April 3, 1911): 

For all children in certain grades. Capacity: — 120. Medical Director: — Dr. Wood- 
son Moss. Principal : — Miss L. C. Whitaker. Supported by the School Board. 

HENRY W. ALLEN SCHOOL (April 3, 1911): 

For all children in one grade. Capacity: — 40. Medical Director: — Dr. Woodson 
Moss. Principal: — Miss Marie Kronenberger. Supported by the School Board. 



MASSACHUSETTS 
BOSTON 

In 1910 the Department of Public Schools, under the direction of Dr. Thomas F. Harring- 
ton, Director of School Hygiene, established iive open air classes in different schools for delicate 
children, the joint capacity being 100. These classes are conducted as part of the regular 
school routine. 

CAMBRIDGE 

CAMBRIDGE FRESH AIR SCHOOL (April i, 1910): 

For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 30. Medical Director: — Dr. 
W. p. Fleet. Teacher: — Miss Anna F. Butler. Supported by the Board of Education. 

133 



OPEN AIR SCHOOLS MINNESOTA, NEW JERSEY, NEW YORK 

MINNESOTA 



ST. PAUL (not yet in operation) 

An open air school will be started in the spring of 191 1 by the St. Paul Anti-Tuberculosis 
Committee, B. Rosing, Executive Secretary. 



NEW JERSEY 

MONTCLAIR 

OPEN AIR CLASS, Cedar Avenue (October 10, 1910): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 21. 
Medical Director: — Dr. Stella S. Bradford. Teacher: — Miss Edith M. Chase. Per 
Capita per Diem Cost for Food: — i6J^ cents. Supported by the Board of Education in 
co-operation with the Montclair Tuberculosis Preventive and Relief Association. 

NEWARK 

PROSPECT SCHOOL, Elizabeth Avenue (February i, 1911): 

For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 30. Medical Director: — 
Dr. George J. Holmes. Principal: — Miss Viena Y. Combs. Supported by the Board of 

Education and the Newark Anti-Tuberculosis Association. 

ORANGE 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE'S FRESH AIR SCHOOL, 283 Central Avenue 
(September 10, 1910) : 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 25. 
Medical Director: — Dr. Ralph H. Hunt. Teacher: — Miss Alice Freeman. Per Capita 
per Diem Cost: — ^40 cents. Supported by Anti-Tuberculosis League of the Oranges, of 
whose Day Camp it is a part. The Board of Education furnishes teacher, books and desks. 

FRESH AIR SCHOOL, 124 Essex Avenue (November 17, 1910): 
For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 18. Medical Director: — 
Dr. Katherine Porter. Teacher: — Miss Strayer. Supported by Board of Education, 
which furnishes suppHes and teacher, and by a private fund for food, clothing, etc. 



NEW YORK 

ALBANY 

ALBANY OPEN AIR SCHOOL, Ashgrove Place (January 9, 1911): 

For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 25. Medical Director: — Dr. 

Charles K. Winne. Teacher: — Miss Mullin. Supported jointly by Albany Tuberculosis 

Committee and the Board of Education. 

BROOKLYN (See New York, Borough of Brooklyn) 
BUFFALO 

OPEN AIR SCHOOL, Delavan and Wyoming Streets (November 9, 1910): 
For children predisposed to tuberculosis. Capacity: — 20. Medical Director: — Dr. 
FrankUn W. Barrows. Principal: — Dr. Channing B. Beach. Per Capita per Diem Cost 

134 



OPEN AIR SCHOOLS NEW YORK 

of Maintenance : — 8.5 cents. Supported entirely by public funds through Departments o^ 
Education and Public Works. 

NEW YORK (Borough of Manhattan and The Bronx) 

CLASS FOR ANiEMIC CHILDREN, P. S. No. 21, Mott and Spring Streets (April, 
1910): 

For anaemic children. Capacity: — 25. Medical Director: — ^Dr. I. Ogden Woodruff. 
Principal: — John Doty. Per Capita per Diem Cost of Food: — 15 cents. Supported 
jointly by the Department of Education and the Committee on the Prevention of Tubercu- 
losis of the New York Charity Organization Society. 

CLASS FOR AN.SMIC CHILDREN, P. S. No. 57, West 44th Street (December, 
1910): 

For anaemic children. Capacity:— 25. Medical Director: — Dr. I. Ogden Woodruff. 
Principal: — Thomas Fretz. Supported jointly bj' the Department of Education and the 
Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the New York Charity Organization Society. 

CLASS FOR AN.^EMIC CHILDREN, P. S. No. 107, 272 East loth Street (March, 
1911): 

For anaemic children. Capacity: — 25. Medical Director: — Dr. I. Ogden Woodruff. 
Principal: — Mrs. H. A. Tupper. Supported jointly by the Department of Education 
and the Conunittee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the New York Charity Organization 
Society. 

GIRLS' CLASS FOR AN.EMIC CHILDREN, P. S. No. 65, Eldredge and Hester 
Streets (191 1) (not yet in operation) : 

For anasmic girls. Capacity: — 25. Medical Director: — Dr. I. Ogden Woodruff. 
Principal: — Miss Elizabeth S. Harris. Supported jointly by the Department of Education 
and the Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the New York Charity Organiza- 
tion Society. 

BOYS' CLASS FOR ANEMIC CHILDREN, P. S. No. 65, Eldredge and Hester 
Streets (191 1) (not yet in operation) : 

For anaemic boys. Capacity: — 25. Medical Director: — Dr. I. Ogden Woodruff. 
Principal : — Mr. John E. Wade. Supported jointly by the Department of Education and 
the Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the New York Charity Organization 
Society. 

• BOYS' CLASS FOR AN.S;MIC CHILDREN, P. S. No. 33, West 28th Street (March, 

1911): 

For anaemic boys. Capacity: — 25. Medical Director: — Dr. I. Ogden Woodruff. 

Principal: — Miss Alida S. WilHams. Supported jointly by the Department of Education 

and the Conunittee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the New York Charity Organizat ion 

Society. 

GIRLS' CLASS FOR AN.S;MIC CHILDREN, P. S. No. 2>2, West 28th Street (March, 
1911): 

For anaemic girls. Capacity:— 25. Medical Director: — Dr. I. Ogden Woodruff. 
Supported jointly by the Department of Education and the Committee on the Prevention of 
Tuberciolosis of the New York Charity Organization Society. 

OPEN AIR SCHOOLS OF DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (not yet in opera- 
tion) : 

The Department of Education of New York City has decided to establish twenty open 
air schools, the seven above mentioned being part of that number. Some of the schools 
do not provide outdoor sleeping and resting balconies, but all of them provide a maximum 
amount of fresh air at all times. The other schools will be estabUshed in 191 1 and 191 2. 

13s 



OPEN AIR SCHOOLS NEW YORK 

DAY CAMP WESTFIELD OPEN AIR SCHOOL, Foot of Jackson Street, East 
River (September, 1909): 

For children with tuberculosis in any stage. Capacity: — 37. Medical Director: — 
Dr. John H. Huddleston. Teacher: — Mrs. K. V. Sheridan. Supported by the Depart- 
ment of Education and Gouverneur Hospital. 

OPEN AIR CLASS FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN, BELLEVUE FERRY-BOAT 
DAY CAMP (November 22, 1909): 

For crippled children, especially those with surgical tuberculosis. Capacity: — 20. 
Medical Director: — Dr. James Alexander Miller. Supported jointly by The Miss Spence 
School Society, Bellevue Hospital, and the Department of Education. 

OPEN AIR CLASS FOR TUBERCULOUS CHILDREN, BELLEVUE FERRY- 
BOAT DAY CAMP (December, 1908) :_ 

For children with pulmonary tuberculosis in any stage of the disease. Capacity: — 
34. Medical Director: — Dr. James Alexander Miller. Per Capita per Diem Cost, exclusive 
of teachers' salaries and transportation:— 53 cents. Supported by Bellevue Hospital, and 
the Department of Education, which furnishes teachers. 

SPECLAL OPEN AIR CLASS OF VANDERBILT CLINIC DAY CAMP (June, 
1909): 

For children with tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 150. Med- 
ical Director: — Dr. F. Morris Class. Teacher: — Miss F. K. Rowe. Supported by Van- 
derbilt Day Camp in co-operation with the Department of Education, which furnishes teacher 
and books. 

TUBERCULOSIS CAMP, MIDDLETOWN, OPEN AIR SCHOOL (November i, 
1909): 

For favorable cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in children. Capacity : — 74. Medical 
Director: — Dr. B. H. Waters. Principal: — Miss Agnes O'Brien. Per Capita per Diem 
Cost: — 67 cents. Supported jointly by the Department of Health, the Women's AuxiUary 
of the Department of Health, and the Department of Education. 

NEW YORK (Borough of Brooklyn) 

OPEN AIR SCHOOL SUSQUEHANNA (September, 1909): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity : — 40. 
Medical Director: — Dr. Hartwig Kandt. Superintendent: — James Jenkins, Jr., 69 
Schermerhorn Street. Per Capita per Diem Cost of Food: — 22 cents. Supported 
jointly by the Brookl3Ti Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis and the Board of 
Education. 

ROCHESTER 

OPEN AIR SCHOOL, Scio Street (October 4, 1909): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 30. 
Medical Director: — Dr. George W. Goler. Principal: — Miss K. E. Fichtner. Per 
Capita per Diem Cost: — 25 cents. Supported by Rochester Public Health Association, 
the Board of Education furnishing teacher, and the Board of Health medical attendance. 

SYRACUSE (not yet in operation) 

An open air school will be established in Syracuse in 191 1 by the local anti-tuberculosis 
league in co-operation with the school authorities. 



136 



OPEN AIR SCHOOLS OHIO, PENNSYLVANIA 

OHIO 

CINCINNATI (not yet in operation) 

In January, 1911, the School Department began the construction of a "roof-room" 
on one of the pubHc schools for the open air treatment of children predisposed to tubercu- 
losis. 

COLUMBUS (not yet in operation) 

The Columbus Society for the Prevention and Cure of Tuberculosis will start an open 
air school in a remodelled building during the spring of 191 1. 

COLUMBUS OPEN AIR SCHOOL (191 1) (not yet in operation) : 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 40. 
Principal :— Miss Anna Sims. Supported entirely by the Board of Education, Edward B. 
MacFadden, Clerk. 

PENNSYLVANIA 



HAZLETON 

HAZLETON OPEN AIR SCHOOL (February 27, 191 1): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity : — 40. 
Medical Director :— Dr. W. C. Gayley. Teacher :— Miss Carrie P. Meyer. Supported 
jointly by the school authorities, the Anti-Tuberculosis Society, and the State Dispensary. 

MOUNT AIRY 

MOUNT AIRY OPEN AIR SCHOOL (1910): 

For all children in the Fourth Grade. Capacity: — 30. 

PHILADELPHIA 

JACKSON SCHOOL, 12th and Federal Streets (March, 1911): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 25. 
Medical Director: — Dr. H. R. M. Landis. Supported by the Henry Phipps Institute and 
the Board of Education. 

McCALL SCHOOL, 7th and DeLancey Streets (March, 1911): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 25. 

Medical Director: — Dr. H. R. M. Landis. Supported by the Henry Phipps Institute and 

the Board of Education. 

PITTSBURG 

OPEN AIR SCHOOL OF THE TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF PITTSBURG 

(May, 1907): 
For incipient and advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity: — 25. Medical Director: 
—Dr. WiUiam Charles White. Teacher: — Mrs. Carmack. Per Capita per Diem Cost: — 
47J^ cents. Supported by the Tuberculosis League of Pittsburg. 

PROTESTANT ORPHANAGE OPEN AIR SCHOOL, PerrysviUe Avenue (1911): 
Capacity: — 50. Medical Director: — Dr. William Charles White. Conducted by 
the Protestant Orphanage in co-operation with the Pittsburg Tuberculosis League. 

137 



OPEN AIR SCHOOLS RHODE ISLAND, WISCONSIN 

RHODE ISLAND 



PAWTUCKET 

SUMMIT STREET OPEN AIR SCHOOL, Summit Street (May i, 1910): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity: — 25. 

Medical Director: — Dr. James L. Wheaton, Jr. Teacher: — Miss Millicent S. Lovell. 

Supported by Board of Education. 

PROVIDENCE 

PROVIDENCE FRESH AIR SCHOOL (January, 1907): 

For children predisposed to tuberculosis, and also for children with tuberculosis of joints 
and glands. Capacity: — 25. Medical Director: — Dr. Ellen A. Stone. Teacher: Miss 
Marie Powers. Supported jointly by the School Department and the League for the Sup- 
pression of Tuberculosis. 



WISCONSIN 



KENOSHA 

KENOSHA OPEN AIR SCHOOL (March i, 1911): 

For children with incipient tuberculosis or predisposed to the disease. Capacity : — 30. 
Medical Director: — Dr. G. Windesheim. Supported by the Board of Education and the 
Kenosha Anti-Tuberculosis Association. 



138 



Associations and Committees for 

the Study and Prevention of 

Tuberculosis 

in the 

United States 



Associations and Committees for the 

Study and Prevention of 

Tuberculosis 



in the 
United States 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

The aim of this section has been to give a list of all associations and commit- 
tees for the study and prevention of tuberculosis. The term "committee" 
indicates that the agency named is a part of some charitable, social or civic 
organization, or of a state or county anti-tuberculosis society. A few associa- 
tions, whose sphere is in the more general fields of health or social work, but 
who give special attention to tuberculosis, have been included. 

The associations are grouped alphabetically, according to location, under 
their respective states, the only exception being in the case of the State associa- 
tions, which are uniformly given first. The figures in parentheses after the 
name of the association indicate the date of founding the organization. The 
Canadian associations are listed in the last section of the Directory. 

As an appendix to this section on associations a few typical forms of organi- 
zation have been given. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS (March, 1904): 

Executive Office: — 105 East 22nd Street, New York City. President: — Dr. William 
H. Welch, Baltimore. Honorary Vice-Presidents: — Theodore Roosevelt, Dr. William 
Osier. Vice-Presidents: — Dr. Victor C. Vaughan, Dr. George Dock. Secretary: — Dr. 
Henry Barton Jacobs, Baltimore. Treasurer: — Gen. George M. Sternberg, Washington. 
Executive Secretary: — Dr. Livingston Farrand. Assistant Secretaries: — Philip P. 
Jacobs and Dr. Thomas Spees Carrington. 

The National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis is a society 
composed of physicians and laymen, the government of which is vested in a Board of sixty 
Directors, twelve of whom are elected each year by the Association. 

An annual meeting is held in May or June, the proceedings of which are published in 
single volmnes. Affiliated with the National Association are the various state and local 
associations and the institutions Hsted in this directory. 

The Association conducts a campaign of education with regard to tuberculosis in all 
parts of the United States; stimulates organized activity along both state and local Unes; 

141 



ASSOCIATIONS ALABAMA, ARIZONA 

conducts investigations in various fields; and acts as a clearing house of information on all 
subjects connected with the tuberculosis problem. 

In developing its activities a Bureau of Publicity has been established in the executive 
ofl5ce, which carries on an active campaign of publicity through the press of the country by the 
issuance of bulletins at regular intervals, the preparation of special articles, and in various 
other ways. 

There has also been established a Bureau of Construction, by which information and 
expert advice are furnished to committees and individuals engaged in the construction of 
tuberculosis hospitals, sanatoria, or other institutions. A handbook on construction is pub- 
lished by the Association and a large collection of plans and photographs are on file for 
consultation. 

In connection with its general educational work two traveling exhibitions are conducted 
by the Association, each in charge of a Director. For the past two years they have been 
operating in the southern and western sections of the country. 



ALABAMA 

BIRMINGHAM 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY (June 21, 1910): 
Executive Office: — 30S Chamber of Commerce. President: — Sidney Bowie. Sec- 
tary :— William M. McGrath. 

MONTGOMERY 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF MONTGOMERY (May 26, 1908): 
Executive Office : — 503 Bell Building. President :^Frank StoUenwerck, Jr. Secre- 
tary : — Miss Julia Johnston. Executive Chairman : — Dr. Gaston J. Greil. 



ARIZONA 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

THE ARIZONA ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (May 20, 1909): 
President: — Walter Hill, Phoenix. Secretary: — Dr. John W. Flinn, Prescott. 



PHOENIX 

MARICOPA COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (February, 1910): 
President: — Dr. J. M. Sligh. Secretary: — Howard S. Reed. 

PRESCOTT 

YAVAPAI COUNTY SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (November, 1909): 
President:— W. D. Baker. Secretary:— Dr. C. E. Yount, Prescott. 

TUCSON 

ARIZONA HEALTH LEAGUE OF TUCSON (November 17, 1905): 
Secretary : — Mrs. H. Drachman, 347 S. Sixth Avenue. 

142 



ASSOCIATIONS ARKANSAS, CALIFORNIA 

ARKANSAS 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

ARKANSAS ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (September 22, 1908): 
President :— Dr. J. S. Shibley, Paris. Secretary :— Dr. W. G. Thompson, Hot Springs. 



FORT SMITH 

FORT SMITH SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (December 8, 1908) : 
President:— Dr. J. D. Southard. Secretary:— C. C. Calvert, Box 72. 

PINE BLUFF 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY OF JEFFERSON COUNTY (December 1,1910): 
President: — Rabbi Ephraim Frisch, Pine Bluff. 

SILOAM SPRINGS 

SILOAM SPRINGS ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND CURE OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (1910): 
President: — Dr. J. Z. Sexton. 



CALIFORNIA 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS (1907): 

Executive Office: — 240 Bradbury Building, Los Angeles. President: — Dr. Gayle 
G. Mosely, Redlands. Secretary :— Dr. George H. Kress. 



ALAMEDA 

ALAMEDA CITY AUXILIARY TO ALAMEDA COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS 

SOCIETY (September, 1909) : 
President: — Dr. Weston O. Smith. Secretary: — M. Lassen, 1223 High Street. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY (See Oakland) 

LONG BEACH 

LONG BEACH ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (February 25, 1909): 
President: — Charles Brown, 211 First National Bank. Secretary: — Dr. F. L. 
Rogers, 406 National Bank. 

143 



ASSOCIATIONS CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 

LOS ANGELES SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (1908): 
President: — Dr. Norman Bridge. Secretary: — Dr. Donald J. Frick. 

MONROVLA 

VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION OF MONROVIA (May i, 1908): 
President: — Mrs. J. H. Bartle, Mayflower Avenue. Secretary: — Mrs. Harriet L. 
Snow, 158 Highland Place. 

OAKLAND 

ALAMEDA COUNTY SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (February 25, 1909): 
Executive Office: — 525 17th Street. President: — Rev. C. Macon. Secretary: — 
Miss Annie F. Brown. Assistant Secretary: — Mrs. Helen Lotspeich. 

PASADENA 

PASADENA SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (February 22, 1909): 

President: — Dr. Henry Sherry. Secretary: — Dr. E. H. McMillan, Chamber of 
Commerce. 

REDLANDS 

REDLANDS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1908): 
President: — O. H. Hicks. Secretary: — Dr. Gayle G. Mosely. 

SACRAMENTO 

WHITE CRUSADERS (October 13, 1908): 

President: — Dr. W. A. Briggs. Secretary: — Thomas B. Leeper. 

SAN DIEGO 

SAN DIEGO SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (1908, Incorporated May 9, 1910): 
President: — J. A. Parks. Secretary: — Mrs. Samuel Brust, 1019 Date Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

SAN FRANCISCO SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(June 25, 1908): 
Executive Office: — 1547 Jackson Street. President: — Thomas E. Hayden. Secre- 
tary: — Dr. WilHam C. Voorsanger. Executive Secretary: — Dr. R. G. Brodrick. 

SAN JOSE 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (November, 1909; reorganized March, 1911): 
Executive Office: — Associated Charities Building. President: — Miss Gertrude F. 
Rowell. Secretary: — Mrs. J. C. Blair. 

SANTA ANA 

SANTA ANA SOCIETY FOR STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March 3, 1909): 
President: — Hon. John N. Anderson. Secretary: — Dr. John Wehrly, io63^ East 
4th Street. 

144 



ASSOCIATIONS COLORADO, CONNECTICUT 

SANTA BARBARA 

SANTA BARBARA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (November lo, 1909): 
President: — Mrs. Huron Rock. Secretary:— Mr. Stanley C. Mason, 724 State 

Street. 

SIERRA MADRE 

SIERRA MADRE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS (March 12, 1909): 

President :— E. W. Camp, West Grand View Avenue. Acting Secretary :— Dr. R. H. 
Mackerras, 146 West Central Avenue. 



COLORADO 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

COLORADO STATE ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL 
OF TUBERCULOSIS (Incorporated December 31, 1908): 

Executive Office:— Room 29 State Capitol Building, Denver. Chairman:— Dr. G. 
Walter Holden. Executive Secretary:— S. Poulterer Morris. 



COLORADO SPRINGS 

COLORADO SPRINGS ASSOCLA.TION FOR THE PREVENTION AND CON- 
TROL OF TUBERCULOSIS (1910): 
President: — Dr. P. O. Hanford. Secretary: — F. J. Bruno. 



CONNECTICUT 



STATE COMMISSION 

CONNECTICUT STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION (1909): 

Executive Office: — State Capitol, Hartford. President: — Dr. George H. Knight. 

Secretary: — George I. Allen. Note: — The other members are: John F. Gunshannan and 

George E. Hall. 



HARTFORD 

HARTFORD SOCIETY FOR PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1905): 
President: — John B. Lxmger. Secretary: — Dr Henry F. Stoll, 75 Pratt Street. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE HARTFORD FREE BED FUND (April 14, 

1908): 

Chairman: — George L. Vannais, 1524 Broad St. Secretary: — Charles B. Whittelsey, 

164 North Beacon St. Note: — Composed of representatives from 15 factory units, who 

contribute volimtarily toward the support of fellow workers ill with tuberculosis. This 

conunittee operates independently of the Hartford Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis. 

10 145 



ASSOCIATIONS CONNECTICUT, DELAWARE 

MERroEN 

UNDERCLIFF ASSOCIATION (November 15, 1907): 

President: — Robert A. Ashworth. Secretary: — Hugh F. Hagarty, 76 Liberty Street. 

MIDDLETOWN 

MIDDLESEX ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (June 25, 1909): 
President: — Dr. James Murphy, 423 Main Street. Secretary: — Miss Ethel Bates, 22 
Lawn Avenue. 

NEW BRITAIN 

TUBERCULOSIS RELIEF SOCIETY OF NEW BRITAIN (May, 1908): 
President: — Abraham L. Buol. Secretary: — P. F. King, 426 Myrtle Street. 

NEW HAVEN 

NEW HAVEN COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (October 17, 

1902): 
President: — Dr. Francis Bacon. Recording Secretary: — Prof. Irving Fisher, 450 
Prospect Street. 

NORWALK 

NORWALK COMMITTEE OF THE FAIRFIELD COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCU- 
LOSIS ASSOCIATION (February, 1909): 
President: — Mrs. John S. Seymour. Secretary: — Mrs. William J. Tracey. 

SOUTH MANCHESTER 

TUBERCULOSIS FREE BED FUND ASSOCIATION OF CHENEY BROTHERS 

(March 6, 1908): 
President: — William R. Foley, Jr. Secretary: — Miss Margaret Hyde, 145 Main 
Street. Note : — A relief association for the 4000 employees of Cheney Brothers. 

STAMFORD 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF 
STAMFORD (February 9, 1910): 

Executive Office: — 167 Greyrock Place. Chairman: — Dr. J. J. Cloonan. General 
Secretary: — Miss Agnes M. Robertson. 

WATERBURY 

WATERBURY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (January, 1908): 
Executive Office: — City Hall Annex, Room 6. President: — Arthur R, Kimball. 
Secretary: — Dr. Thomas J. Kilmartin. Publicity Secretary: — Howard L. Udell. 



DELAWARE 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

DELAWARE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (June 17, 1906): 

Executive Office: — i West 5th Street, Wilmington. President: — Miss Emily P. 

Bissell, 1404 Franklin Street, Wilmington. Secretary:— Miss Edith S. Danforth, 1401 

Delaware Avenue, Wilmington. 

146 



ASSOCIATIONS DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, FLORIDA, GEORGIA 

STATE COMMISSION 

DELAWARE STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION (May, 1909): 
Executive Office: 1013 Washington Street, Wilmington. President: John Ban- 
croft. Secretary: Dr. Harold L. Springer. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



WASHINGTON 

ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (1902): 

Executive Office: — 923 H Street, N. W. President: — Gen. George M. Sternberg. 
Secretary: — Miss Ruth Rizer. 



FLORIDA 



JACKSONVILLE 

DUVAL COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (March i, 1909): 
President: — Hon. R. B. Archibald. Secretary: — Miss Alison N. Locke, 217 W. 
Ashley Street, Jacksonville. 



GEORGIA 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

GEORGIA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS AND SANITARY SOCIETY (1909): 
President: — Dr. T. E. Oertel, Augusta. Secretary: — Dr. J. Monroe Anderson, 

Pinedale, Talbot County. 



ATLANTA 

ATLANTA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS AND VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION 

(1907): 
Executive Office: — 708 Gould Building. President: — Hon. Steve R. Johnston. 
Secretary: — Miss Rosa Lowe. 

AUGUSTA 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY OF RICHMOND COUNTY (January 
28, 1908): 

Executive Office:— 206 Montgomery Building. President: — Dr. T. E. Oertel. 
Secretary: — Mrs. E. S. Hollingsworth. 

MACON 

MACON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS AND SANITARY SOCIETY (December 16, 

1909): 
President: — Emory Winship. Secretary: — Frank B. West, 417 Cherry Street. 

147 



ASSOCIATIONS HAWAII, ILLINOIS 

SAVANNAH 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF 

SAVANNAH (iqoq): 
Executive Office: — City Hall. Secretary: — Miss Helen B. Pendleton. Chairman: 
—Dr. Walter S. Wilson. 

WAYCROSS 

WAYCROSS AND WARE COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS AND SANI- 
TARY SOCIETY (February i6, 1910): 
President: — Dr. R. P. Izlar. Secretary: — Harry D. Reed. 



HAWAII 



HONOLULU 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF HONOLULU (1909): 

President: — Joseph P. Cooke. Secretary: — James A. Rath, P. O. Box 514. 



ILLINOIS 



STATE ASSOCLATION 

ILLINOIS STATE ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (1905, Reorganized June 15, 1910): 

Executive Office : — 157 West Adams Street, Chicago. President: — Dr. W. A. Evans. 
Secretary: — Frank E. Wing. Assistant Secretary: — Arthur J. Strawson. 



BLOOMINGTON 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES (1909): 
Chairman: — Dr. E. Mammen. Secretary: — ^J. L. Hasbrouck. 

CHICAGO 

THE CHICAGO TUBERCULOSIS INSTITUTE (May i, 1906): 
Executive Office : — 157 West Adams Street. President : — Dr. Henry B. FaviU. Act- 
ing Superintendent: — Frank E. Wing. Assistant Superintendent: — Arthur J. Strawson. 

EVANSTON 

EVANSTON TUBERCULOSIS INSTITUTE (1910): 

President:— Dr. W. R. Parks. Secretary:— Dr. William C. Danforth. 

JACKSONVILLE 

JACKSONVILLE SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1905): 
President : — Mrs. F. J. Heinl. Secretary : — Dr. David Reed. 



ASSOCIATIONS ILLINOIS, INDIANA 

PEORIA 

PEORIA ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(January 3, 1905): 
President :— Dr. Sumner M. Miller. Secretary:— Dr. J. H. Bacon, 237 Woolner 
Building. 

PONTIAC 

COMMITTEE ON TUBERCULOSIS OF THE PONTIAC ASSOCIATED CHARI- 
TIES (1910): 
Secretary:— C. E. Ligg. 

ROCK ISLAND 

ROCK ISLAND COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December, 
1910): 

President:— Dr. E. M. Sala, Rock Island. Secretary:— Mrs. J. C. Earnhardt, 
Moline. 

SPRINGFIELD 

SPRINGFIELD TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (September 26, 1910): 
Executive Office: — 717 East Washington Street. President: — Dr. L. C. Taylor, 

Illinois National Bank Building. Secretary : — Louis G. Coleman, Illinois National Bank 

Building. 

WAUKEGAN 

LAKE COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS INSTITUTE (September 3, 1908): 
Executive Office: — 125 North Genessee Street. President: — J. W. Barwell. Secre- 
tary:— Dr. W. C. Bouton. Manager:- Dr. W. H. Watterson. 



INDIANA 

STATE ASSOCLA.TION 

INDD^NA ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(November 4, 1907). 



EVANSVILLE 

VANDERBURGH COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1907): 
Executive Office: — 219 Read Street. President: — Dr. James Y. Welbom. General 

Secretary: — Dr. C. A. Hartley. 

FORT WAYNE 

FT. WAYNE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (June 27, 1910): 

President: — Dr. Eric Crull. Secretary: — Miss Italia Evans, 521 East Berry Street. 

LAFAYETTE 

LAFAYETTE SOCIETY FOR PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (May, 1908): 
President : — Professor Severance Burrage. Corresponding Secretary : — Charles W. 

Ebel. 

149 



ASSOCIATIONS INDIANA, IOWA 

MUNCIE 

DELAWARE COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLA.TION (February 23, 

1909): 
President: — Mrs. Elmer Whiteley. Secretary: — Miss Luella Anderson, 314 Johnson 
Block. 

RICHMOND 

THE WAYNE COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1907): 
President: — B. F. Wissler, Cambridge City. Secretary: — Dr. S. E. Bond, 207 North 
9th Street. 

SOUTH BEND 

SOUTH BEND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (Jmie 26, 1908): 
President: — Mrs. Harry D. Johnson. Secretary: — Mrs. Mary S. Robinson, 925 
West Washington Street. 

TERRE HAUTE 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE SOCIETY FOR ORGANIZING 

CHARITY (December, 1909): 
Chairman: — L. J. Cox. Secretary: — Miss Rhoda M. Welding, 914 Chestnut Street. 



IOWA 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

The Board of Control of State Institutions has a special Department on Tuberculosis, 
with an annual appropriation of $5000. The Board employs a lecturer who gives all of his 
time to the work of stimulating and organizing local anti-tuberculosis activity. The Board 
also has an exhibit and distributes large quantities of literature, thus performing in many 
ways the fimctions of a state association. A. E. Kepford, Des Moines, and Dr. J. W. KJme, 
Fort Dodge, are Lecturers for the Department on Tuberculosis. 



DAVENPORT 

DAVENPORT ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (October 20, 1910): 
President: — Rabbi Fineshriber, 217 East 14th Street. Secretary: — EmiUe Wittig. 

DES MOINES 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES (1910): 
Chairman : — Dr. Gershom H. Hill. Secretary : — H. S. Hollingsworth. Note : — This 

committee was formerly The Des Moines Health League, organized in 1908. 

DUBUQUE 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION 

(March i, 1910): 
Executive Office:— 656 Main Street. President: — Mrs. B. Kauffman, 506 Bluff 
Street. Secretary: — Mrs. Quinlan, 900 Bluff Street. Visiting Nurse: — Miss Jessie M. 
Keys. 

150 



ASSOCIATIONS KANSAS, KENTUCKY 

MASON CITY 

MASON CITY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (December, 1910): 
President : — Dr. Fred Albert. Secretary : — F. A. Mahannah. 

SHENANDOAH 

SHENANDOAH SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (November i, 1910): 
President:— Hon. O. H. Frink. Secretary:— Dr. J. F. Aldrich. 



KANSAS 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

KANSAS ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (December 3, 1908): 

President : — Dr. Charles Lerrigo, Topeka. Secretary : — Dr. J. L. Everhardy, Leaven- 
worth. 



TOPEKA 

TOPEKA ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (March, 1910): 

Executive Office: — 335 Jackson Street. President: — A. A. Godard. Secretary: — 
Mrs. C. B. Thomas. 



KENTUCKY 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

KENTUCKY ASSOCIATION FOR STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (September 29, 1909): 
Executive Office: — 215 East Walnut Street, Louisville. President: — C. L. Adler. 
Secretary: — Eugene Kemer. 



CYNTHIANA 

CYNTHLA.NA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLA.TION (November, 1909): 
President: — Chester M. Jewett. Secretary: — Dr. W. B. Moore. 

GEORGETOWN 

SCOTT COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (July 14, 1910): 
President: — Fred Olsen. Secretary: — Dr. H. V. Johnson. . 

HENDERSON 

HENDERSON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (Incorporated March, 
1909): 

President: — James E. Rankin. Secretary: — Miss Virginia Lockett, 131 South Main 
Street. 

151 



ASSOCIATIONS KENTUCKY, LOXHSIANA 

LATONIA 

LATONIA-COVINGTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (December 9, 1908): 
Secretary: — Miss Augusta V. Hankins. Note: — This Association will probably be 

reorganized in 191 1 as the Kenton County A\nti-Tuberculosis Association. 

LEXINGTON 

FAYETTE COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (November 27 

1905) : 
Executive Office: — Associated Charities Building. President: — Dr. F. H. Clarke. 
Secretary : — Mrs. Jennie Ashbrook, Clay Avenue. 

LOUISVILLE 

LOUISVILLE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLATION (June, 1905): 
Executive Office: — 121 W. Chestnut Street. President: — W. W. Davies. Secre- 
tary: — F. A. Sampson. 

OWENSBORO 

OWENSBORO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (June, 1909): 
President: — Mrs. W. M. Rudd, 928 Locust Street. Secretary: — Miss Sue Slaughter, 
Triplett Street. 

PADUCAH 

PADUCAH ASSOCLATION FOR THE STUDY, PREVENTION AND CURE OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (March 15, 1910): 
President: — H. C. Rhodes. Secretary: — Alonzo R. Meyers, 1901 Broadway. 

STANFORD 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY OF LINCOLN COUNTY (October 23, 1910): 
President: — Dr. W. B. O'Bannon. Secretary: — J. W. Ireland. 



LOUISIANA 
STATE ASSOCIATION 

THE LOUISIANA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (December 4, 1906): 
Executive Office: — 1309 Tulane Avenue, New Orleans. President: — Dr. G. Farrar 
Patton. Secretary : — Dr. Adolph Henriques. Assistant Secretary : — Mrs. L. P. Geissert. 



ALEXANDRIA 

RAPIDES BRANCH OF LOUISIANA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (June, 

1908) : 
President:— Dr. G. M. G. Stafford. Secretary:— Miss A. Lehman, 4tli and Elliot 

Streets. 

AMITE CITY 

AMITE CITY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (December 22, 1908): 
Secretary: — Mrs. T. M. Bankston. 

152 



ASSOCIATIONS LOUISIANA 

BATON ROUGE 

BATON ROUGE TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (May lo, 1909): 
Secretary: — Dr. Charles McVea, 319 3rd Street. 

BOGALUSA 

BOGALUSA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (June 29, 1909): 
Secretary: — Mrs. W. H. Sullivan. 

COVINGTON 

COVINGTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (October 24, 1908): 
Secretary: — William G. Evans. 

FRANKLINTON 

FRANKLINTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (January, 1909): 
Secretary: — J. W. Bateman. 

GARYVILLE 

GARYVILLE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (September 15, 1909): 
Secretary: — Mrs. H. E. Reynolds. 

GREENSBURG 

GREENSBURG ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (March 19, 1910): 
Secretary:— R. E. Cole. 

HOMER 

HOMER ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (April 15, 1908): 
Secretary : — Dr. W. L. Stone. 

LAFAYETTE 

LAFAYETTE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (March 12, 1910): 
Secretary: — Hon. F. V. Moulin. 

PATTERSON 

PATTERSON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (June 3, 1909): 

ST. JOSEPH 

ST. JOSEPH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (June, 1909): 
Secretary: — Dr. Louis Murdock. 

SHREVEPORT 

SHREVEPORT BRANCH OF LOUISIANA TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (June 

9, 1908) : 
President: — Dr. Randall Hunt. 

TALLULAH 

TALLULAH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (February, 1909): 
Secretary : — Dr. George W. Gains. 



153 



ASSOCIATIONS MAINE, MARYLAND 

MAINE 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

MAINE STATE ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (igoi): 
President: — Right Rev. Robert Codman, Portland. Secretary: — Mrs. George BrowTi 
Goodwin, Biddeford. 



BANGOR 

BANGOR ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (July, 1909): 

President: — Rev. H. L. Griffin, High Street. Secretary: — F. A. Carleton, Box 322. 

LEWISTON 

^■^ ANDROSCOGGIN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January, 1910; 
j^^ incorporated January, 191 1): 

'■^ Executive Office: — Room 16, Journal Building, Lewiston. President: — Hon. Frank 
L. Dingley, Auburn. Secretary : — Miss Alice Frost Lord. 

WATERVILLE 

CENTRAL MAINE ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (AprU 18, 1910): 
President:— J. Howard Welch. Secretary :—W. O. Hersey, Fairfield. 



MARYLAND 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

MARYLAND ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (December 13, 1904): 
Executive Office: — 15 East Pleasant Street, Baltimore. President: — Dr. Henry 
Barton Jacobs. Executive Secretary: — H. Wirt Steele. 



ANNAPOLIS 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY BRANCH OF MARYLAND ASSOCIATION FOR 

PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (1906): 
President: — J. De Peyster Douw. Secretary: — Dr. Louis B. Henkel, Jr., Murray 
Avenue. 

CAMBRIDGE 

DORCHESTER COUNTY BRANCH OF THE MARYLAND ASSOCIATION 

FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (1906): 
Secretary:— Dr. Guy Steele, i Church Street. 

CUMBERLAND 

ALLEGANY COUNTY BRANCH OF THE MARYLAND ASSOCIATION FOR 

THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (January, 1909): 
Chairman: — Miss Caroline DeF. Penniman. 

IS4 



ASSOCIATIONS MARYLAND, MASSACHUSETTS 

EASTON 

SANITATION COMMITTEE, CIVIC LEAGUE OF TALBOT COUNTY (January, 

1908) : 
Chairman: — Miss M. B. Dixon. 

FREDERICK 

FREDERICK COUNTY BRANCH OF THE MARYLAND ASSOCIATION FOR 
THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (December 7, 1907): 
Executive Office:— 34 East Patrick Street. President:— Dr. Thomas Freeman 
Dixon. Secretary: — Miss M. Louise Johnson, loi East 2nd Street. 

HAGERSTOWN 

HAGERSTOWN CIVIC LEAGUE (191 1): 

President:— Mrs. James Findlay. Chairman Tuberculosis Committee:— Dr. Vic- 
tor D. Miller, Jr. 

ROCKVILLE 

SOCIAL SERVICE LEAGUE OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY (November 27, 1908): 
President:— Rev. T. J. Packard. Secretary :— Miss A. C. Kingdon. 

SNOW HILL 

THE SNOW HILL ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (January 19, 1909): 
President:— Hon. John Walter Smith. Secretary:- John W. Staton. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

ASSOCIATED COMMITTEES OF THE MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL SO- 
CIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(June, 1906): 
Executive Office:— 3 Joy Street, Boston. President: — Dr. Arthur T. Cabot. Sec- 
retary: — Dr. John B. Hawes, and. 

STATE COMMISSION 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMP- 
TIVES (Appointed as a Commission by Act of Legislature in June, 1907; changed 
into a Board of Trustees upon the completion of the Westfield State Sanatorium, 
February, 1910): 
Executive Office:— 3 Joy Street. Chairman:— Dr. Arthur T. Cabot. Secretary:— 
Dr. John B. Hawes, 2nd. Note: — The Board has control of the four State Sanatoria at 
Rutland, North Reading, Lakeville and Westfield, Mass. 



ADAMS 

ADAMS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December 4, 1908): 
President: — Henry L. Harrington. Secretary :— Miss Jessie B. Kerr. 



ASSOCIATIONS MASSACHUSETTS 

AND OVER 

ANDOVER TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (October, 1907): 

Chairman: — A. E. Stearns. Secretary:— Markham W. Stackpole, 1S9 Main Street. 

ATTLEBORO 

ATTLEBORO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (March 10, 191 1): 
President: — Rev. Fred A. Moore, 140 County Street. Secretary: — Mrs. Frank 
Rounseville, 197 South Main Street. 

BOSTON 

BOSTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (April 21, 1903): 
Executive Office:— 4 Joy Street. President: — Robert Treat Paine. Secretary: — 
Seymour H. Stone. 

BROCKTON 

THE BROCKTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(January 2, 1907): 
Executive Office: — 31 Centre Street. President: — B. B. Russell. General Secre- 
tary: — Miss Efl&e M. Eldredge. 

BROOKLINE 

BROOKLINE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (May 22, 1907): 

President: — Moses Williams. Secretary: — James F. LeB. Drumm, 25 Edgehill Road. 

CAMBRIDGE 

THE CAMBRIDGE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (October 30, 1903): 
Executive Office : — 689 Massachusetts Avenue. President : — Dr. Eugene A. Darhng. 
General Secretary : — Miss Mabel L. Greeley. 

CANTON 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF CANTON (December 18, 1910): 
President: — Rev. John J. Farrell. Secretary: — Mrs. E. B. Luce. 

CHELSEA 

CHELSEA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (June, 1907): 

President: — Thomas B. Frost. Secretary: — Dr. George B. Fenwick, 19 Gary Avenue. 

CLINTON 

CLINTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (June 26, 1908): 
President: — Dr. W. P. Bowers. Secretary: — Miss Ellen K. Stevens, Box 67. 

CONCORD 

CONCORD TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (1910): 
Chairman: — Mrs. George Minot Baker. 

EVERETT 

THE EVERETT ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (April, 1908): 
President: — Dr. A. A. Jackson. Secretary: — Dr. W. L. Howe. 

156 



ASSOCIATIONS MASSACHUSETTS 

FALL RIVER 

FALL RIVER ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (November 27, 1908; incorporated 
December 2, 1908): 

Executive Office: — Room 205, Globe Building. President: — Dr. John H. GifFord. 
Secretary: — Dr. William W. Marvel, 320 Pine Street. Assistant Secretary: — Miss Ella 
A. Wilcox. 

FITCHBURG 

FITCHBURG SOCIETY FOR THE CONTROL AND CURE OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(April 25, 1907): 
Executive Office: — 145 Main Street, Room 50. President: — Dr. E. P. Miller. 
Secretary: — Miss Susan M. Turner. 

GARDNER 

GARDNER ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (November 24, 1908): 
President: — Dr. George B. Underwood, 105 Central Street. Secretary: — Miss Alice 
W. Heywood, 61 Central Street. 

GREAT BARRINGTON 

COMMITTEE ON PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS OF VISITING NURSE 
ASSOCIATION (July 12, 1909): 

Executive Office: — Room 62, Mahaiwe Block. President: — Dr. M. T. Cavanaugh, 
Main Street. Secretary : — Miss Edna Whitelaw. 

HAVERHILL 

HAVERHILL ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (May 7, 1907): 

Executive Office: — 28 White Street. President: — Dr. I. J. Clarke, 112 Emerson 
Street. Secretary: — Dr. Thomas N. Stone. 

HOLYOKE 

HOLYOKE ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (February 22, 1907): 
Executive Office:— Y. W. C. A. Building. President:— Dr. C. A. Allen. Clerk:— 
Miss N. G. Dwight. General Secretary: — Mrs. R. S. Vining. 

HUDSON 

HUDSON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (May 12, 1909): 
President: — ^Mrs. E. Lester Larkin. Secretary: — Mrs. Charles M. Haughton, 202 
Main Street. 

LAWRENCE 

LAWRENCE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (October 30, 1907): 
Executive Office:— 825 The Bay State. President:— Dr. C. G. Carleton. Secre- 
tary: — Miss Grace C. Merrill. Registrar: — Dr. J. Forrest Burnham. 

LYNN 

LYNN TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (March i, 1907): 

President: — Rev. Ernest J. Dennen. Secretary: — Dr. H. W. Newhall, 82 Broad 
Street. 

157 



ASSOCIATIONS MASSACHUSETTS 

MALDEN 

COMMITTEE ON TUBERCULOSIS OF THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES (1907): 
Executive Ofl5ce: — 15 Ferry Street. Chairman: — Dr. Godfrey Ryder. Secretary: 

— Mrs. S. Izetta George. 

MEDFORD 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF MEDFORD VISITING NURSE 

ASSOCIATION (May 7, 1907): 
Executive Office: — 14 Salem Street. Secretary: — Mrs. George H. Folger, Summit 
Road. Chairman: — Dr. Lincoln F. Sise, 9 Powder House Road. 

MELROSE 

MELROSE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January 5, 1909): 
President:— Dr. Willis M. Townsend. Secretary: — Mrs. Frank M. Hoyt, 16S 
East Emerson Street. 

NEW BEDFORD 

NEW BEDFORD ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (October 6, 1906): 
President : — Rev. William B. Geoghegan. Secretary : — Edwin P. Seaver. 

NEWBURYPORT 

NEWBURYPORT ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January 8, 1909): 
President: — Frank F. Morrill. Secretary: — Mrs. William Dole, 3 High Street. 

c 

NORTHAMPTON 

NORTHAMPTON ASSOCLATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL 
OF TUBERCULOSIS (November 22, 1907): 

President: — Charles E. Childs. Secretary: — Mrs. Addie C. Huxley, 22 Maple Street, 
Florence. 

PITTSFIELD 

PITTSFIELD ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (June i, 1908): 
President: — Dr. J. F. A. Adams. Secretary: — Miss Julia W. Rediield, 290 Launtte 
Street. 

QUINCY 

QUINCY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (November 24, 1908): 
President: — Henry M. Faxon. Secretary: — Mrs. Wilson Marsh, 61 Irving Place. 

SALEM 

COMMITTEE ON PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1907) : 

Executive Office : — 10 Washington Square. Chairman : — Samuel J. Foster. Medical 

Director: — Dr. Walter G. Phippen. Corresponding Secretary: — Dr. William V. Mc- 

Dermott. 

SOMERVILLE 

TUBERCULOSIS DEPARTMENT OF THE VISITING NURSING ASSOCIA- 
TION (1906): 
President: — Mrs. Sanford Hanscom, i Webster Street. Secretary: — Mrs. John A. 

Avery, 22 Dartmouth Street. 

158 



ASSOCIATIONS MASSACHUSETTS, MICHIGAN 

SOUTH FRAMINGHAM 

FRAMINGHAM NURSING-RELIEF AND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIA- 
TION (1901; reorganized 1909); 
Secretary : — Mrs. Fred Oaks. / 

SPRINGFIELD 

THE SPRINGFIELD ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (November 21, 1904): 

Executive Office: — 525 Main Street. President: — Dr. Ralph B. Ober. Clerk: — 
W. Meredith Warfield. • 

TAUNTON 

TAUNTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND PREVENTION OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (November, 1908): 

Executive Office: — 61 Main Street. President: — Hon. F, E. Austin. Secretary: — 
Miss Bertha J. Southwick. / 

WALTHAM 

WALTHAM ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (June 4, 1908): 
President: — J. S. Kennedy. Secretary: — Dr. C. Benjamin Fuller, 826 Main Street. 

WORCESTER 

WORCESTER TUBERCULOSIS RELIEF ASSOCIATION (incorporated Novem- 
ber 14, 1907, as successor to the Worcester Association for the Relief and Control of 
Tuberculosis, founded January 14, 1904): 

President: — Dr. Albert C. Getchell. Secretary: — Dr. W. Irving Clark, 37 Pearl 
Street. 



MICHIGAN 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

THE MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (February 21, 1908): 
Executive Office: — Medical Building, Ann Arbor. President :— Dr. A. S. Warthin, 
Ann Arbor. Secretary: — Miss Carol F. Walton. 



ALPENA 

ALPENA COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January, 1908): 
President:— Dr. J. D. Dunlop. Secretary:— Dr. C. M. Williams. 

ANN ARBOR 

ANN ARBOR ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January 29, 1909): 
Executive Office: — Medical Building. President: — Rev. C. S. Patton. Secretary: 

— Dr. W. B. Hinsdale, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 

AU SABLE 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE WOMAN'S CLUB (January, 191 1): 
Chairman: — Mrs. George W. McNichol. 

159 



ASSOCIATIONS MICHIGAN 

BATTLE CREEK 

BATTLE CREEK ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLATION (February i6, 1909): 
President: — C. M. Ranger. Secretary: — Dr. C. E. Stewart, 219 Manchester Street. 

BAY CITY 

BAY COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (1909): 
President: — AI. L. Davies. Secretary: — Dr. F. E. Ruggles. 

BELDING 

BELDING ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (May 19, 1909): 
President — Dr. William Bell. Secretary: — Dr. Marjory Orr. 

BENTON HARBOR 

BENTON HARBOR ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLA.TION (March, 1908): 
President: — Dr. G. A. Allmendinger. Secretary: — Dr. Fred R. Belknap. 

BESSEMER 

BESSEMER ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (March, 1909): 
Secretary :—Winiam S. Baird. 

CADILLAC 

CADILLAC ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (February 16, 1910): 
President: — Mrs. Delos Diggins. Secretary: — Mrs. Joe Smith. 

CARO 

CARO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (May 28, 1909): 
President: — Dr. Frederick P. Bender. Secretary: — Mrs. Ida M. Ryan. 

COLDWATER 

COLDWATER ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December, 1909): 
President: — Dr. VV. H. Baldwin. Secretary: — Miss Josie M. Keeley, 104 N. Clay 
Street. 

COOPERSVILLE 

COOPERSVILLE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (December, 1907): 
President: — M. de Graaf. Secretary: — N. H. Kassabian. 

DETROIT 

DETROIT SOCIETY FOR STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March 21, 1905): 
Executive Office: — 604 Woodward Arcade. President:— Dr. Herbert M. Rich. 
Secretary-Treasurer: — Mrs. Clara B. Arthur. Assistant Secretary: — Miss Maude Van 
Syckle. 

EATON RAPIDS 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF LADIES' HISTORY CLUB (October, 1910): 
Chairman: — Mrs. Rufus Hyde. 

ESCANABA 

DELTA COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (March 18, 1909): 
President: — Dr. C. A. Girard. Secretary: — Dr. O. C. Breitenbach. 

160 



ASSOCIATIONS MICHIGAN 

FLINT 

FLINT ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (April, 1910): 
President: — Dr. F. A. Aldrich. Secretary: — Dr. F. A. Roberts. 

FRANKENMUTH 

FRANKENMUTH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January, 1909) : 
President: — Leonard Reichle. Secretary: — Dr. E. A. Pillsbury. 

FREMONT 

FREMONT ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1909) : 
President: — G. G. Burns. Secretary: — Dr. N. Deliaas. 

GRAND HAVEN 

GRAND HAVEN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January, 1909): 
President: — Mrs. Van I. Witt. Secretary: — Mrs. L. Van den Berg. 

GRAND RAPIDS 

GRAND RAPIDS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (March 3, 1905): 
Executive Office:— 23 Park Street. President:— M. R. Bissell, Jr. Secretary:— 
Miss Ethel M. McCormick. 

HASTINGS 

HASTINGS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (June, 1908): 
President: — Dr. Charles Russell. Secretary: — Prof. M. E. Osborne. 

HILLSDALE 

HILLSDALE COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (December, 1908): 
President: — Rev. W. F. Jerome. Secretary: — Dr. Bion Whelan. 

HOLLAND 

HOLLAND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (June, 1908) : 
President: — Hon. Luke Lugers. Secretary: — Dr. A. Leenhouts. 

HOLLY 

HOLLY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January 18, 1909): 
President: — Dr. T. E. McDonald. Secretary: — Mrs. M. E. Lockwood. 

HOUGHTON 

HOUGHTON COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (March 2, 1908): 
Executive Office:— Hancock. President:— Dr. L. L. Hubbard. Secretary:— 

Miss Margaret Scallon. 

HOWELL 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF HOWELL WOMEN'S CLUB (Decem- 
ber, 1909): 
Chairman: — Mrs. William P. Van Winkle. 

lONL/^ 

IONIA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (February 13, 1909): 
President:— Dr. E. F. Beckwith. Secretary:— Miss Sue R. Townsend, 322 Lafayette 
Street. 

II i6i 



ASSOCIATIONS MICHIGAN 

JACKSON 

JACKSON COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (April 30, 190S): 
President : — Dr. N. H. Williams. Secretary : — Dr. H. D. Obert, Union Bank Building. 

KALAMAZOO 

KALAMAZOO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (February 7, 1909): 
President: — Dr. Herman Ostrander. Secretary: — Dr. John B. Jackson, 403 Kala- 
mazoo National Bank Building. 

LANSING 

INGHAM COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (January 31, 1909): 
President: — Dr. J. F. Campbell. Secretary: — Dr. Clara M. Davis. 

LUDINGTON 

LUDINGTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December 16, 1908): 
President:— Dr. George E. Gray. Secretary:— Rev. W. H. Long. 

MANISTEE 

MANISTEE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (March 8, 1911): 
Secretary: — Dr. S. Szudrawski. 

MANISTIQUE 

SCHOOLCRAFT COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND 

RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (November 16, 1910): 
President: — Dr. G. M. Livingston. Secretary: — Mrs. A. M. Le Roy. 

MARSHALL 

MARSHALL ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (February, 1908): 
President : — Dr. Starr King Church. Secretary : — E, B. Stuart, 

MUSKEGON 

MUSKEGON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (March, 1908): 
President :— Dr. F. W. Garber. Secretary :— Dr. J. T. Cramer. 

owosso 

OWOSSO BRANCH OF MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION 

AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (May 5, 1908): 
President : — Mr. Stanley E. Parkill. Secretary : — Miss Marie Brewer, 508 W. Oliver 
Street. 

PAW PAW 

PAW PAW BRANCH OF MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION 

AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (May, 1910): 
President: — Dr. O. E. Lamphear. Secretary: — Mrs. W. F. Hoyt. 

PETOSKEY 

PETOSKEY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLA.TION (1909): 
President: — W. Bedford Jones. 

162 



ASSOCIATIONS MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA 

PORTLAND 

PORTLAND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (May, 1910): 
President: — Dr. F. W. Martin. Secretary: — Hon. J. E. Bradfield. 

REED CITY 

REED CITY SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (February 26, 1909): 
President: — Dr. H. L. Foster. Treasurer: — L. G, Hammond, 

SAGINAW 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION OF SAGINAW (January 25, 1909) : 
President: — Dr. George L. Alger. Secretary: — Mrs. Frank H. Sellers, 335 N. Wash- 
ington Avenue. 

ST. JOHNS 

CLINTON COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (May 21, 1909): 
President: — Dr. W. A. Scott. Secretary: — Dr. Frank C. Dunn. 

ST. LOUIS 

ST. LOUIS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December, 1909): 
President: — Dr. Stiles Kennedy. Secretary: — Dr. George W. Pettey. 

SHELBY 

SHELBY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (December, 1908): 
President :— Dr. J. D. Buskirk. Secretary: — Mrs. W. D. Adams. 

STANTON 

STANTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December, 1909): 
President : — Dr. A. L. Carey, Secretary : — Mrs. Clara D. Pierson. 

YPSILANTI 

YPSILANTI ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1909): 

President: — Rev. A. G. Beach. Secretary: — Mrs. Luther James, 309 Ellis Street. 



MINNESOTA 



STATE ASSOCL^TION 

MINNESOTA ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF 
TUBERCULOSIS (Reorganized and constitution adopted February 25, 1908): 

Executive Office: — Old Capitol, St. Paul. President: — Dr. H. A. Tomlinson, 
St. Peter. Secretary: — Dr. H. L. Taylor, St. Paul. Executive Secretary: — Christopher 
Easton. 



AUSTIN 

COMMITTEE ON TUBERCULOSIS OF THE MOWER COUNTY PUBLIC 

HEALTH ASSOCIATION (February, 1910): 
President:— C. D. Belden. Secretary:— Dr. A. N. Collins. 

163 



ASSOCIATIONS MINNESOTA 

CLOQUET 

CARLTON COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (looo): 
President: — William Kelley. Secretary: — Rev. F. C. Coolbaugh. 

CROOKSTON 

RED RIVER VALLEY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December, 1910): 
President: — Dr. G. S. Wattam, Warren. Secretary: — Mrs. Elsie Spendley, Crooks- 
ton. 

DULUTH 

DULUTH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (December, iqoS): 

President: — B. P. Neff. Secretary: — Charles L. Rakowsky, 201 Exchange Building. 

FARIBAULT 

VISITING NURSING ASSOCIATION OF FARIBAULT (October, 1910): 
President: — Alson Blodgett, Jr. 

FERGUS FALLS 

PARK REGION ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (June, 1908): 
President: — Professor D. G. Ristad. Secretary: — Mrs. Elmer E. Adams. 

MANKATO 

BLUE EARTH COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (July, 1908): 
President: — Dr. A. O. Bjelland. Secretary: — C. J. Posey, 736 S. 2nd Street. 

MINNEAPOLIS 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES 

(1905): 
Executive Office: — City and County Building. Chairman: — E. C. Gale. Secre- 
tary : — Eugene T. Lies. 

ROCHESTER 

THE CIVIC LEAGUE OF ROCHESTER, VISITING NURSE COMMITTEE 

(August, 190S): 
Chairman: — Mrs. W. J. Mayo. 

ST. CLOUD 

HEALTH AND HYGIENE COMMITTEE OF THE ST. CLOUD READING 

ROOM SOCIETY (January, 1910): 
Secretary : — Mrs. J. C. Boehm, 395 Fifth Avenue, South. 

ST. PAUL 

ST, PAUL ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (April 20, 1908) : 
Executive Office: — 61 East 6th Street. President: — Mrs. A. R. Colvin. Executive 
Secretary: — B. Rosing. 

ST. PETER 

ST. PETER ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (February, 1909): 
President: — Rev. D. J. Moran. Secretary: — Mrs. J. C. Clark. 

164 



ASSOCIATIONS MINNESOTA, MISSOURI 

SOUTH ST. PAUL 

SOUTH ST. PAUL ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (November, 1910): 
President: — Mrs. James Forsythe. Secretary: — Mrs. Charles Ross. 

TWO HARBORS 

LAKE COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (January 27, 1909): 
President: — Dr. J. D. Budd, Budd Hospital. Secretary: — Mrs. J. M. Hickox, 413 
Maple Street. 

WARREN 

WARREN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (November, 1910): 
President: — Rev. G. Wahlund. Secretary: — Dr. G. S. Wattam. Executive 

Secretary:— Mrs. A. L. Robinson. 

WILLMAR 

WILLMAR RED CROSS SOCIETY (January, 1910): 

President: — Mrs. George E. Thomas. Secretary:— Mrs. Henry G. Meyer. 

WINONA 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF MARGARET SIMPSON HOME (May, 1908) : 
President: — Dr. H. F. McGaughey, 216 Center Street. Secretary: — Miss Jennie V. 
Doud, 218 N. Sanborn Street. 



MISSOURI 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

THE MISSOURI ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (May 15, 1907): 
Executive Office: — 625 Locust Street, St. Louis. President: — Hon. Herbert S. 
Hadley. Secretary: — Miss Winifred Doyle. 



ARMSTRONG 

HOWARD COUNTY SOCIETY FOR PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(July, 1908) : 
Secretary: — Dr. W. S. Thompson. 

BUTLER 

BATES COUNTY SOCIETY FOR PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (May 

II, 1908): 
President: — Dr. E. N. Chastain. 

CALIFORNIA 

MONITEAU COUNTY SOCIETY FOR RELIEF AND PREVENTION OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (March 12, 1908): 
Secretary : — John F. Short. 

i6s 



ASSOCIATIONS MISSOURI, MONTANA 

CAPE GIRARDEAU 

CAPE GIRARDEAU ASSOCIATION FOR PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(February 12, 190S): 
President :— Dr. W. C. Patton. Secretary:— D. D. Hope. 

COLUMBIA 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF CHARITY ORGANIZATION SO- 
CIETY (December, 1909): 
Chairman: — Dr. W. McN. Miller. Secretary: — Rev, Henry P. Horton. 

KANSAS CITY 

JACKSON COUNTY SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF AND PREVENTION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS (September 26, 1907): 

President: — Dr. Edward W. Schauffler. Secretary: — Mrs. Henry Ohaus, Lillis 
Building, Kansas City. 

NEW LONDON 

RALLS COUNTY SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(June II, 1907): 
President: — Col. Joseph Burnett. Secretary: — Dr. W. T. Waters. 

OWENSVILLE 

GASCONADE COUNTY SOCIETY FOR PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(April 21, 1908): 
President: — George Buschmann. 

ST. JOSEPH 

BUCHANAN COUNTY SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF AND PREVENTION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS (February 22, 1910): 

President: — James H. McCord. Secretary: — Dr. Oliver C. Gebhart, King Hill 
Building, St. Joseph. 

ST. LOUIS 

ST. LOUIS SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF AND PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (May, 1904): 

Executive Office:— 625 Locust Street. President: — Charles P. Pettus. Secretary: 
—Dr. M. C. Tuholske. 

SPRINGFIELD 

GREENE COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (April 13, 1908): 
Secretary: — Dr. Theodore Coffelt. 



MONTANA 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

MONTANA ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND STUDY OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (January 22, 1908): 
President: — Dr. W. F. Cogswell, Livingston. Secretary: — Dr. C. T. Pigot, Butte. 



166 



ASSOCIATIONS NEBRASKA, NEW HAMPSfflRE 

NEBRASKA 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

NEBRASKA ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (December, 1907): 

Executive Office: — 424 City National Bank Building, Omaha. President: — Dr. 
Harold GifEord. Executive Secretary : — Mrs. K. R. J. Edholm. 



HOLDREGE 

HOLDREGE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (October, 1910): 
President : — Rev. F. N. Swanberg. Secretary : — Mrs. J. A. Andrews, 623 West Avenue. 

NORTH PLATTE 

NORTH PLATTE TUBERCULOSIS AND PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION 

(September 2, 1910): 
President: — John Evans. Secretary: — Wilson Tout. 

OMAHA 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (February 10, 1911): 

Chairman: — Miss Ida V. Jontz. Secretary-Treasurer: — Mrs. K. R. J. Edholm, 
424 City National Bank Building. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE BOARD OF THE AMERICAN NATIONAL RED 
CROSS (Succeeds the New Hampshire Society for the Prevention of Consumption, 
1909): 

Vice-Chairman : — George B. Leighton, Monadnock. Secretary: — L. F. Thurber, 

Nashua. 



CONCORD 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE CHARITY ORGANIZATION SOCIETY 

(1908): 
Executive Office: — Room 3, City Building. President: — Rev, W. Stanley Emery. 
Secretary : — Miss Mabel E. Lockhart. 



167 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW JERSEY 

NEW JERSEY 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (]\Iay I, 1906): 
Executive Office: — 164 Market Street, Room 909, Newark. President: — Dr. G. K. 
Dickinson, Jersey City. Executive Secretary: — William C. Smallwood. 



ATLANTIC CITY 

ATLANTIC CITY ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND PREVENTION 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (1907; reorganized in December, 1910): 
President : — J. A. McNamee. Secretary-Treasurer : — Dr. Edward Guion, City Hall. 

BEVERLY 

BEVERLY TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (1907): 
President: — Dr. George T. Tracy. Secretary: — Herman A. Stees. 

BOUND BROOK 

VISITING NURSE COMMITTEE OF WOMAN'S LITERARY CLUB— SUB- 
COMMITTEE ON TUBERCULOSIS (1909): 
Chairman of Committee : — Mrs. L. J. Mattis. 

BRIDGETON 

BRIDGETON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December 6, 1906): 
President: — Dr. Joseph TomUnson, 104 West Commerce Street. Secretary: — Dr. 
Elsmore Stites. 

BURLINGTON 

BURLINGTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1907): 
Secretary: — Miss C. H. Haines, 230 High Street. 

CAMDEN 

CAMDEN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (March i, 1908): 
President: — Dr. Henry H. Davis. 

EGG HARBOR CITY 

EGG HARBOR CITY TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (May 4, 1909): 
President: — Henry M. Cressman. Secretary: — Albert C. Stephany, 506 Bartlett 
Building, Atlantic City. 

ELIZABETH 

ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS 
OF ELIZABETH (November, 1906): 

Executive Office:— Room 26, Union County Court House. President:— Frederick 
J. Faulks. Executive Secretary: — Miss Emily Halsey Suydam. 

ENGLEWOOD 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE UNITED CHARITIES (December 15, 

1908; reorganized December, 1910): 
Chairman:— Mrs. Albert V. Huyler, West Clinton Avenue, Tenafly. Secretary:- 
Mrs. A. J. Donally, Tenafly. 

168 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW JERSEY 

GLASSBORO 

GLASSBORO SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (1907): 
President: — A. M. Seabrook. Secretary: — Dr. Charles S. Heritage. 

HACKENSACK 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY OF HACKENSACK (February, 1911): 
President: — Hon. William M. Johnson. Secretary: — E. B. Walden. 

HAMMONTON 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF HAMMONTON (January 3, 1910): 
Secretary: — Miss Cora R. Bassett, Lock Box 131. 

JERSEY CITY 

COMMITTEE ON TUBERCULOSIS OF THE HUDSON COUNTY FEDERA- 
TION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS (1909): 

Chairman: — Mrs. G. W. Black, 109 Belmont Avenue. Secretary: — Mrs. George E. 
McLaughhn. 

LAKEWOOD 

COMMITTEE ON DISTRICT NURSE AND TUBERCULOSIS (1907): 
Chairman: — Henry S. Kearny. 

MADISON 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF MADISON (January, 1910): 
President: — E. D. Conklin. Secretary: — Miss A. A. BuflSngton, 26 Grove Street. 

MILLVILLE 

MILLVILLE SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (February, 1907): 
President: — Dr. S. D. Bennett. Secretary: — Silas C. Smith. 

MONTCLAIR 

MONTCLAIR TUBERCULOSIS PREVENTIVE AND RELIEF ASSOCD^TION 

(November 30, 1907) : 
President: — Mrs. Hiland Porter, 133 Union Street. Secretary: — Mrs. Edward S. 
Cole, 133 Bellevue Avenue, Upper Montclair. Medical Director: — Dr. Stella S. Bradford. 

MOORESTOWN 

MOORESTOWN BRANCH OF THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCLA.TION FOR THE 

PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (February 14, 1910): 
President: — Dr. Nathan Thorne. Secretary: — Dr. F. G. Stroud. 

MORRISTOWN 

MORRISTOWN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (January, 1909): 
President: — Dr. H. A. Hemiques. Secretary: — W. H. P. Oliver, De Hart Street. 

MOUNT HOLLY 

MOUNT HOLLY BRANCH OF NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION FOR THE PRE- 
VENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (March, 1908) : 
President: — Rev. James Stoddard. Secretary: — Miss Hannah A. Moore, Box 672. 

169 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW JERSEY 

NEWARK 

NEWARK ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (February, 1909): 
Executive Ofl&ce :— 40 Clinton Street. President : — Hon. Franklin Murphy. Secre- 
tary: — Ernest D. Easton, 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

NEW BRUNSWICK SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF 
TUBERCULOSIS: 

President: — Hon. John I. Morrison. Secretary: — Charles S. Cathcart, 192 George 
Street. 

ORANGE 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF THE ORANGES (March, 1904): 
Executive Office: — 124 Essex Avenue. President: — Charles A. Lindsey. Secre- 
tary:— J. Scott MacNutt. 

PATERSON 

COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE CHAR- 
ITY ORGANIZATION SOCIETY OF THE CITY OF PATERSON (1908): 
Executive Office: — Room i, City Hall. President: — Rev. David Stuart Hamilton, 
452 Van Houten Street. Secretary :— Dr. Alfred Drury, 160 Broadway. 

PERTH AMBOY 

PERTH AMBOY TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (December, 1910): 
President: — Dr. William E. Ramsay, 380 High Street. 

PHILLIPSBURG 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY OF PHILLIPSBURG (January 24, 1910): 
President: — Dr. J. M. Reese. Secretary: — Mrs. Jacob J. Henderson, 158 BuUman 
Street. 

PLAINFIELD 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF PLAINFIELD AND NORTH PLAIN- 
FIELD (March i, 1907): 
President: — William S. Tyler. Secretary:— Dr. F. E. DuBois, 431 Park Avenue. 

SOMERVILLE 

SOMERSET COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January 5, 

1909): 

President: — Rev. Father Zimmer, Raritan. Secretary: — Dr. W. H. Merrell, West 
High Street, Somerville. 

SUMMIT 

SUMMIT COMMITTEE FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS OF THE BOARD OF TRADE (June 20, 1908): 
President: — D. L. Haigh. Secretary: — James T. Adams. 

TRENTON 

TRENTON ASSOCD^TION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS: 
Secretary: — David S. South, 145 E. Hanover Street. 

170 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW MEXICO, NEW YORK 

VINELAND 

VINELAND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (May 17, 1907): 
President: — Myron J. Kimball. Secretary: — Dr. George Cunningham, 

WASHINGTON 

WASHINGTON COMMITTEE OF THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION FOR 
THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF TUBERCULOSIS (November, 1908;: 
President:— Dr. C. B. Smith. Secretary:— D. V. WyckoII, 18 Broad Street. 

WOODBURY 

WOODBURY ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (June, 1908): 
President : — William T. Cooper. Secretary : — Howard S. Davis, 65 Red Bank Avenue. 



NEW MEXICO 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

NEW MEXICO SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (September, 1909): ■■^■^■ 
President: — Dr. F. T. B. Fest, East Las Vegas. Secretary: — Dr. Leroy S. Peters, 
Silver City. 



NEW YORK 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

COMMITTEE ON PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE STATE CHAR- 
ITIES AID ASSOCIATION (July, 1907): 

Executive Office: — 105 East 22nd Street, Rooms 603-4, New York. Secretary: — 
Homer Folks. Assistant Secretary : — George J. Nelbach. 



ALBANY 

ALBANY COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (January, 

1908) : 
President : — Charles Gibson. Secretary : — Dr. H. L. K. Shaw, 361 State Street. 

ALBION 

ORLEANS COUNTY COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (September 21, 1909): 
President: — Sanford T. Church. Secretary: — Dr. R. E. Brodie. 

ALTAMONT 

ALTAMONT COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(August, 1909): 
President: — Wheeler D. Wright, Secretary: — E. C. Sturges. 

171 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK 

AMSTERDAM 

AMSTERDAM COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March i6, iqio): 
President: — i:\rthur A. Chalmers. Secretary: — Miss Harriet Wasserman, P. O. 
Box 44. 

BALLSTON SPA 

BALLSTON SPA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(August 27, 1909): 
President: — S. C. Medbury. Secretary: — Dr. J. T. Sweetman, Jr. 

BATAVIA 

GENESEE COUNTY COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (September, 1909): 
President: — Dr. G. W. Cottis. Secretary: — Mrs. John H. Wood, 206 East Main 
Street. 

BATH 

BATH COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1910): 

President: — Mrs. Reuben E. Robie. Secretary: — Mrs. Henry C. Fay. 

BINGHAMTON 

BROOME COUNTY RED CROSS ASSOCL^TION (April, 1907): 

President: — Charles W. Loomis, 74 Carrol Street. Secretary: — Giles H. Dickinson. 

BOONVILLE 

BOONVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1909): 
President:— Dr. W. C. Roser. Secretary :— Rev. F. C. Smith. 

BROCKPORT 

BROCKPORT COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1909): 
President: — Gifford Morgan. Secretary: — L. B. Shay. 

BROOKFIELD 

BROOKFIELD COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1909): 
President:— F. E. York. 

BROOKLYN (See New York, Borough of Brooklyn) 

BROOME COUNTY (See Binghamton) 

BUFFALO 

BUFFALO ASSOCL/^TION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (January 4, 1909): 

Executive Office:— 411 White Building. President: — Irving S. Underhill. Secre- 
tary : — John R. Shillady. 

CAMBRIDGE 

CAMBRIDGE SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(November 9, 1909): 
President : — Professor John H. Kingsley. Secretary : — Frank Richardson. 

172 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK 

CANANDAIGUA 

COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE CANAN- 
DAIGUA HEALTH ASSOCIATION (April 20, 1908;: 

President: — Rev. James T. Dougherty. Secretary: — Dr. A. W. Armstrong, 117 North 
Main Street. 

CANASTOTA 

CANASTOTA TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (1909): 
President: — D. S. Watson. Secretary: — J. E. Vincent. 

CANDOR 

CANDOR COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (Novem- 
ber, 1910): 
President: — Dr. W. A. Moulton. Secretary: — Will L. Beebe. 

CANTON 

CANTON COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (Sep- 
tember 17, 1909): 
President: — Professor R. D. Ford. Secretary: — Dr. L. E. Heaton. 

CARMEL 

CARMEL COIVIMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (August 

30, 1909) : 
President: — Rev. George P. Noble. Secretary: — Mrs. Stephen Ryder. 

CATTARAUGUS 

CATTARAUGUS TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (1909) : 
President:— R. N. Stubbs. Secretary:— W. R. Chase. 

CAZENOVIA 

CAZENOVIA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1910): 
Chairman: — Miss Margaret Stebbins. Secretary: — Mrs. George A. Spear. 

CEDARVILLE 

CEDARVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1911): 
President: — C. J. Wheeler. Secretary: — Dr. Merton W. Brown. 

COHOES 

COHOES COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (Feb- 
ruary 9, 1909) : 
President: — Dr. J. L. Archambault. Secretary: — Charles R. Ford. 

CORNING 

CORNING COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(November 22, 1909): 
President: — Rev. J. M. Bustin. Secretary: — Harry H. Pratt. 

CORTLAND 

CORTLAND COUNTY COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (May, 1908): 
President: — Benjamin L. Webb. Secretary: — Dr. R. P. Higgins, 20 Court Street. 

173 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK 

CUBA 

CUBA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (September 

lo, 1909): 
President:— C. A. Ackerly. Secretary: — Dr. J. C. Young. 

DE RUYTER 

DE RUYTER COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1909): 
President: — I. S. Sears. Secretary: — Edson A. Fuller. 

DOBBS FERRY 

DOBBS FERRY TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (1909): 
Chairman: — Dr. Champion H. Judson. Secretary: — J. L. Travis. 

DOLGEVILLE 

DOLGEVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1911): 
President: — W. H. Faville. Secretary-Treasurer:— E. A. Stone. 

DRYDEN 

DRYDEN TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (September 10, 1909): 
President: — Webb Corbin. Secretary: — J. B. Fulkerson. 

DUNDEE 

DUNDEE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (October, 

1909) : 
Secretary:— H. C. W. Retallick. 

DUNKIRK 

DUNKIRK COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (De- 
cember, 1909): 
President: — Dr. V. D. Bozovsky. Secretary: — Rev. J. T. Badgley. 

ELLENVILLE (Ulster County) 

ELLENVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1909) : 
Chairman: — Rev. A. E. Lord. Secretary: — Mrs. B. C. Eaton. 

ELLICOTTVILLE 

ELLICOTTVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March, 19 10): 
President:— Dr. W. B. Johnston. Secretary :—F. L. Keith. 

FAYETTEVILLE 

FAYETTEVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(October 29, 1909): 
President: — W. C. Hunt. Secretary: — Miss Harriet E. Wilkin. 

FONDA 

FONDA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (Sep- 
tember, 1909): 
President:- Dr. E. J. Abbott. Secretary: — Professor W. H. Edwards. 

174 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK 

FORT PLAIN 

FORT PLAIN COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(igio): 
President : — Dr. Douglas Ayres. Secretary : — H. S. G. Loveless. 

FREEPORT 

FREEPORT COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(September, 1909): 
President: — Rev. W. A. Richard. Secretary: — J. D. Kiefer. 

FULTON 

FULTON COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (De- 
cember, 1 9 10): 
President: — H. L. Paddock. Secretary: — Dr. E. A. Gladman. 

GENESEE COUNTY (See Batavia) 

GENEVA 

ONTARIO COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (May, 1909): 
President: — H. B. Graves, Geneva. Secretary: — Miss Calista McCauly, Stanley. 

PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF GENEVA (May, 1908): 
Executive Office: — Room 4, Opera House Block. President: — Dt. John Parmenter. 
Secretary : — Miss Ethel S. Slosson. 

GLENS FALLS 

GLENS FALLS COMMITTEE ON PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (March, 

1910):. 
President: — G. F. Eayle. Secretary: — H. M. Peck. 

GLOVERSVILLE 

GLOVERSVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1911): 
President : — Hon. William C. Mills. Secretary : — John E. Stille. 

GOWANDA 

GOWANDA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March, 19 10): 
President: — Joseph H. Schaack. Secretary: — Dr. I. W. Livermore. 

HERKIMER 

HERKIMER COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1911): 
President: — Dr. Irving O. Nellis. Secretary: — Rev. L. H. Shaw. 

HORNELL 

HORNELL COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(September 10, 1909): 
President: — R. M. Prangen. Secretary: — Dr. B. R. Wakeman. 

HUDSON 

HUDSON COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (October 

IS, 1909): 
President :— Mrs. R. W. Evans, 418 Warren Street. Secretary :— Dr. L. Van Hoesen, 
511 Warren Street. 

I7S 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK 

HUDSON FALLS 

HUDSON FALLS COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(August, iQog): 
President: — C. W. Higley. Secretary: — Major John Dwyer, 225 Main Street. 

ITHACA 

ITHACA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (191 1): 
President: — Rev. C. W. Heizer. Secretary: — B. E. Sanford. 

JAMESTOWN 

JAMESTOWN COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(December 10, 1909) : 
President: — Rev. Dr. Horace G. Ogden. Secretary: — Ernest Cawcroft, Fenton 
Building. 

KENDALL 

KENDALL COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1910): 
President:— Dr. A. J. Clark. Secretary:— J. U. Merrill. 

KINGSTON 

ULSTER COUNTY COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(May, 1909): 
President: — Hon. Joseph M. Fowler. Secretary: — Dr. Mary Gage-Day, 207 Wall 
Street. 

LAKE GEORGE 

LAKE GEORGE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1910): 
Chairman: — Rev. P. Livingston. Secretary-Treasurer: — Jerome Hubbell. 

LEONARDSVILLE 

LEONARD SVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (1910): 
President:— Dr. O. W. Burhyte. Secretary:— A. M. Coon. 

LE ROY 

LE ROY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (February 11, 1908): 

President: — Dr. S. W. Skinner. Secretary: — Dr. George H. Davis, 3 Main Street. 

LEWIS COUNTY (See Lowville) 

LITTLE FALLS 

LITTLE FALLS COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(January, 191 1): 
President: — David H. Burrell. Secretary: — Charles V. Wheeler. 

LITTLE VALLEY 

LITTLE VALLEY COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March, 1910): 
President: — Rev. George Turk. Secretary: — T. Champlin. 

176 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK 

LOCKPORT 

LOCKPORT COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(February, 1910): 
President: — Dr. J. A. Lewis. Secretary: — Dr. F. A. Walters. 

LOWVILLE 

LEWIS COUNTY COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1909): 
President: — Mrs. R. R. Pennock. Secretary: — A. G. Steinbrenner. 

MALONE 

MALONE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(November, 19 10): 
President: — G. H. Hale. Secretary: — Mrs. F. H. Bryant. 

MASSENA 

MASSENA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(November 4, 1 9 10): 
President: — F. A. Anderson. Secretary: — Dr. M. J. Stearns. 

MIDDLETOWN 

MIDDLETOWN TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (April, 1909): 
President: — E. T. Hanford. Secretary: — Russell Wiggins, 39 North Street. 

MIDDLEVILLE 

MIDDLEVILLE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1911): 
President: — Rev. Albert G. Judd. Secretary: — Miss M. C. Burns. 

NAPLES 

NAPLES COMMITTEE ON PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (June 5, 1908): 
President: — C. I. Lewis. Secretary: — Mrs. S. I. Smith. 

NEWBURGH 

NEWBURGH TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (April 30, 1909): 
Executive Office: — 21 Grand Street. President: — John AspinwaU. Secretary: — 
John F. Tucker. 

NEW YORK (Borough of Manhattan) 

COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE CHARITY 

ORGANIZATION SOCIETY (June i, 1902): 
Executive Office: — 105 East 22nd Street. Chairman: — Edgar J. Levey. Director: — 
Lawrence Veiller. Secretary: — Frank H. Mann. 

NEW YORK (Borough of Brooklyn) 

COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE BROOK- 
LYN BUREAU OF CHARITIES (March, 1905): 
Executive Office: — 69 Schermerhorn Street. Chairman: — Frederick B. Pratt. 
Executive Secretary: — James Jenkins, Jr. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND CURE OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (October i, 1910): 
Executive Office: — 113 Schermerhorn Street. President: — R. Ross Appleton, 14th 
Street Bank, New York City. Secretary: — James Jenkins, Jr., 69 Schermerhorn Street. 
13 177 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK 

Note:— Organized under the direction of the Brooklyn Committee to enlist the political clubs 
and organizations. The Brooklyn Committee furnishes lectures in political clubhouses. The 
organization is non-partisan, and plans are formulated to extend its scope to other cities. 

NIAGARA FALLS 

NIAGARA FALLS COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(February, 1910): 
President: — Joseph E. Montague. Secretary: — R. G. Smith, Care of The Gazette. 

NORWOOD 

NORWOOD COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS(i9io): 
President : — Rev. L. H. Johnston. Secretary : — Mrs. George Harris. 

NYACK 

ROCKLAND COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (May, 1910): 
Honorable Chairman: — S. R. Bradley. Vice-Chairman : — Dr. E. H. Maynard. 

OGDENSBURGH 

OGDENSBURGH COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(December, 1910): 
President:— Dr. W. B. Hanbidge. Secretary:— Dr. F. D. Earl. 

OLEAN 

OLEAN COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (Novem- 
ber, 1909): 
President: — W. H. Mandeville. Secretary: — Robert Wharton Russell, Y. M. C. A. 

ONEIDA 

ONEIDA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (191 1): 
Chairman: — Dr. E. B. Bailey. Secretary: — Dr. Lavinia R. Davis. 

ONTARIO COUNTY (See Geneva) 
ORLEANS COUNTY (See Albion) 

OSWEGO 

OSWEGO COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1909): 
President: — Luther W. Mott. Secretary: — Dr. H. S. Albertson. 

OWEGO 

OWEGO COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1910): 
President: — Dr. W. L. Ayer. Secretary: — Mrs. H. Austin Clark, 314 Main Street. 

PALMYRA 

PALMYRA CIVIC CLUB (May, 1908): 

President: — Mrs. L. M. Chase, Fayette Street. Secretary: — Mrs. A. C. Hopkins, 
33 Cuyler Street. 

PHELPS 

PHELPS SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1909): 
President: — Mrs. F. A. Salisbury. Secretary:— Dr. Harlan J. O. Howe, 

178 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK 

PLATTSBURGH 

PLATTSBURGH COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(October 13, 1910): 
President: — Hon. L. L. Shedden. Secretary: — Miss Elizabeth Taylor. 

POLAND 

POLAND COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (191 1): 
President: — Dr. R. E. Platner. Secretary-Treasurer: — R. W. Read. 

POUGHKEEPSIE 

POUGHKEEPSIE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1909): 
President: — Dr. J. C. Otis. Secretary: — Dr. F. J. Mann, 262 Main Street. 

RANDOLPH 

RANDOLPH COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March, 1910): 
Secretary: — Mrs. H. C. Henderson. Treasurer: — J. M. Barker. 

ROCHESTER 

ROCHESTER PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION (1897): 

Executive OflBce: — 32 South Washington Street. Secretary and Supervising 
Director: — Dr. Montgomery E. Leary. Assistant Secretary: — John J. Maney. 

ROCKLAND COUNTY (See Nyack) 

ROME 

ROME COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (December, 

1907): 
President: — Dr. Charles Bernstein. Secretary-Treasurer: — N. K. Graves. 

SALAMANCA 

SALAMANCA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (June, 1910): 
President: — Rev. M. F. Tripp. Secretary: — Carey D, Davie. 

SARANAC LAKE 

SARANAC LAKE SOCIETY FOR THE CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS (April 
12, 1907): 

Executive Office: — 64 Main Street. Honorary President: — Dr. E. L. Trudeau. 
President: — Frank E. Kendall. Executive Secretary: — F. L. Fairchild. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS 

SARATOGA SPRINGS COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (1910): 
President: — Geo. R. Salisbury. Secretary: — John D. Kay. 

SARATOGA, TOWN OF (See SchuylerviUe) 

SCHENECTADY 

SCHENECTADY COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(February 29, 1908): 
President:— E. F. Peck. Secretary:— Rev. A. W. Clark, 436 State Street. 

179 



ASSOCL\TIONS NEW YORK 

SCHENEVUS 

SCHENEVUS COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(August 26, igog): 
President: — George Lovell. Secretary: — D. Stanley Chase. 

SCHUYLERVILLE 

TOWN OF SARATOGA COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (July ig, igio): 
President:— \\illiam S. Ostrander. Secretary: — Rev. David C. Weidner. 

SYRACUSE 

THE SYRACUSE LEAGUE FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(igog): 
Executive OflBce: — 207 East Jefferson Street. President: — Salem Hyde. Secre- 
tary : — W. A. JMacKenzie, Jr. 

TROY 

TROY TUBERCULOSIS RELIEF COMMITTEE (January 14, iqo8): 
Executive Office: — 401 Frear Building. President: — W. Leland Thompson. Secre- 
tary: — Miss M. H. Dyer. 

ULSTER COUNTY (See Kingston) 

UTICA 

UTICA TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (November 25, igo7): 
President:— Dr. Florence I. Staunton, 14 Cottage Place. Secretary :— Miss Natalie 
Gilbert. 

VALATIE 

VALATIE COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1910): 
President: — P. J. Cunningham. Secretary-Treasurer: — Dr. C. E. Slater. 

WALTON 

WALTON COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (igio): 
President: — Rev. Gilbert Pember. Secretary: — Dr. W. R. Gladstone. 

WARRENSBURG 

SANITATION COMMITTEE OF THE SANITARY AND CIVIC ASSOCIATION 

OF WARRENSBURG (January 7, 1909): 
Chairman: — Dr. J. E. Goodman. 

WARSAW 

WARSAW COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (Sep- 
tember, igog): 
President: — Rev. O. L. H. Mohn. Secretary: — F. A. Rice. 

WATERLOO 

WATERLOO COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(May, 1908): 
President: — W. F. Bacon. 

180 



ASSOCIATIONS NEW YORK, NORTH CAROLINA 

WATERTOWN 

WATERTOWN COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(September 9, 1909): 
Executive Office: — Watertown Tuberculosis Dispensary, 162 Stone Street. Presi- 
dent: — Eli W. Herrick, 255 Mullin Street. Secretary: — Dr. W. H. Leak, 104 Court Street. 

WATERVLIET 

WATERVLIET COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March, igio): 
President: — Rev. J. T. Slattery. Secretary: — Miss Mary J. O'Brien. 

WESTPORT 

WESTPORT ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(September, 1909) : 
President: — B. J. Worman. Secretary: — Dr. Charles E. Payne. 

WHITE PLAINS 

WHITE PLAINS COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(September, 1909): 
Secretary: — Mrs. H. C. Henderson. 

WHITNEY'S POINT 

WHITNEY'S POINT COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (August, 1909): 
President: — Dr. H. D. Burghardt. Secretary: — J. F. Taylor. 

YONKERS 

YONKERS SANITARY LEAGUE (April, 1905): 

President: — Dr. S. E. Getty, 84 Ashburton Avenue. Secretary: — Dr. W. H. 
Vermilye, 291 Nepperhan Avenue. 



NORTH CAROLINA 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS (May, 1906) : 

President: — Dr. Richard H. Lewis, Raleigh. Secretary: — Dr. Charles A. Julian, 
Thomasville. 



CHARLOTTE 

MECKLENBURG COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (Februarj^ 

I, 1910): 
President:— Dr. I. W. Faison. Secretary:— Dr. John Q. Myers, 11 North Tryon 
Street. 

DURHAM 

DURHAM ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (March 24, 1908): 
President :— T. B. Fuller. Secretary :— Dr. Thomas A. Mann. 

181 



ASSOCIATIONS NORTH CAROLINA, NORTH DAKOTA 

FAYETTEVILLE 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (November 

13, 1909): 
President: — John A. Oates. Secretary: — J. F. Highsmith. 

GREENSBORO 

GUILFORD COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (July 22, 1909): 
President:— E. P. Wharton. Secretary:— Dr. William P. Eeall. 

HENDERSONVILLE 

HENDERSON COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December 7, 

1909): 
President : — Rev. R. N. Wilco.x. Secretary : — Dr. William Redin Kirk. 

RALEIGH 

WAKE COUNTY SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (December 18, 1909): 
President: — Mrs. W. N. Hutt. Secretary: — Dr. Albert Anderson. 

SALISBURY 

ROWAN COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (November 20, 1909): 
President: — Dr. John Whitehead, loi North Main Street. Secretary: — Dr. W. W. 
McKenzie, 228 West Bank Street. 

SMITHFIELD 

JOHNSTON COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (May 20, 1910): 
President: — Dr. A. H. Rose. Secretary: — Miss Mattie Pon. 

STATESVILLE 

IREDELL COUNTY ASSOCLA.TION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (September 21, 1909): 

President: — Dr. M. R. Adams. Secretary: — Dr. J. E. McLaughlin, P. O. Box No. 
117. 

TARBORO 

EDGECOMBE COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (August 23, 

1910): 
President: — John R. Pender, Secretary:— Dr. Spencer P. Bass. 

WINSTON-SALEM 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED OF WINSTON- 
SALEM (July 8, 1910): 

Executive Office: — 415 Masonic Temple. Chairman: — Col. J. L. Ludlow. Secre- 
tary :— Mrs. Delia H. Holroyd. 



NORTH DAKOTA 



STATE ASSOCL^TION 

NORTH DAKOTA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (February 25, 1909): 
President: — Dr. J. Grassick, Grand Forks. Secretary: — Mrs. E. P. Quain, Bismarck. 



ASSOCIATIONS OHIO 

OHIO 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

OHIO SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (rgoi): 
Executive Office: — Columbus. President: — Dr. John H. Lowman, Cleveland, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary: — Robert G. Paterson. 



CANTON 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF CANTON (April 5, 1910): 
President: — John K. Batter. Secretary: — Dr. Esther M. Tyrrell, 127 North Cleve- 
land Avenue. 

CELINA 

MERCER COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (February 8, 1909): 
Secretary: — S. Wilkin. 

CHILLICOTHE 

ROSS COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (November 9, 1908): 
President : — Rev. Dr. R. G. Noland. Secretary : — Mrs. Harriet R. Hunter, 188 North 
High Street. 

CINCINNATI 

CINCINNATI ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (January 31, 1907): 
Executive Oflace:— 209 West 12th Street. President:— Dr. Otto P. Geier. Secre- 
tary: — D. C. Keller. Superintendent: — Samuel P. Withrow. 

CLEVELAND 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF CLEVELAND (March 3, 1905): 
Executive Office : — 501 St. Clair Avenue. President : — Dr. John H. Lowman. Secre- 
tary : — Dr. Robert H. Bishop, Jr. 

COLUMBUS 

THE COLUMBUS SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND CURE OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (December 5, 1906): 

Executive Office: — 34 East Rich Street. President: — Mrs. Samuel L. Black, 1000 
Bryden Road. Corresponding Secretary: — Mrs. L. R. Doty. Medical Director: — 
Dr. C. O. Probst. 

DAYTON 

THE TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY OF DAYTON (March 16, 1908): 

President: — Charles A. Craighead. Secretary: — Miss Emma King, Court House. 

EATON 

EATON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (June i, 1909): 
President: — D.J.Miller. Secretary: — John E. Parker. 

183 



ASSOCIATIONS OHIO, OKLAHOMA 

LIMA 

ALLEN COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS AND HEALTH LEAGUE (August 20, 

I goo): 
Executive Office: — 322 Holland Block. President: — Dr. William E. Hovers. Sec- 
retary: — Dr. James B. Poling. 

STEUBENVILLE 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF STEUBENVILLE (February, 1910): 
President:— Mrs. Garrett B. Le Van, 403 North Fourth Street. Secretary:— Miss 
Lucy Wintringer. 

TOLEDO 

THALIAN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1909): 

President: — Miss Florence B. Netlleton, 2221 Jefferson Avenue. Medical Director: 
— Dr. Ralph P. Daniells, 228 Michigan Street. 

YOUNGSTOWN 

YOUNGSTOWN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1908): 
Executive Office:— 102 East Front Street. President:— Dr. H. E. Welch. Secre- 
tary: — J. M. Hanson. 



OKLAHOMA 



STATE ASSOCLATION 

OKLAHOMA STATE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (January 12, 1910): 
President:— Dr. J. M. Postelle, 229 West nth Street, Oklahoma City. Secretary:— 
R. H. Riley, Lock Box 228, Oklahoma City. 



ALTUS 

JACKSON COUNTY SCHOOL HEALTH CLUB (1910): 
President: — Professor J. M. Dale. Secretary: — Miss Forest Gray. 

GUTHRIE 

LOGAN COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (February 10, 1910): 
President:— W. S. Calvert. Secretary:— Mrs. M. C. Hart. 

OKLAHOMA CITY 

OKLAHOMA COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (April i, 1910): 
Executive Office: — Room 515, Insurance Building. President: — Dr. A. E. Daven- 
port. Secretary: — Mrs. A. E. Davenport. 

SHAWNEE 

SHAWNEE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (March x6, 1910): 
President:— Dr. W. C. Bradford. Secretary:— Dr. J. E. Hughes. 



ASSOCIATIONS OREGON, PENNSYLVANIA 

OREGON 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

OREGON STATE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (December 14, 1908): 
President: — Dr. R. E. Lee Steiner, Salem. Secretary: — Dr. E. A. Pierce, 1008 Cor- 
bett Building, Portland. 



PORTLAND 

THE VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION (Tuberculosis work started 1909): 
Executive Office: — 601 Medical Building. President: — Mrs. B. H. Trumbull. 



PENNSYLVANIA 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1892): 
Executive Office: — 407 Roger Williams Building, 17th and Chestnut Streets, Phila- 
delphia. President: — Asa S. Wing. Executive Secretary: — J. Byron Deacon. 



ALLENTOWN 

ALLENTOWN BRANCH OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY FOR THE PRE- 
VENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (May 15, 1908): 

President : — Dr. W. H. Hartzell. Secretary : — Dr. J. Treichler Butz, 304 North 9th 
Street. 

BETHLEHEM 

BETHLEHEMS BRANCH OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY FOR THE 

PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (April 4, 1910): 
President:— Dr. William P. Walker. Secretary:— Dr. W. D. Chase. 

BRADFORD 

NORTHWESTERN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (October 18, 1909): 
President : — Hon. Lewis Emery, Jr. Secretary : — Miss Anna M. Hanley. Manager : 
— M. F. Melvin. 

EASTON 

THE EASTON BRANCH OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY FOR THE PRE- 
VENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (March 9, 1908): 
President : — Dr. E. M. Green. Secretary : — John H. McGrath, Easton Daily Express. 

ERIE 

ERIE BRANCH OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY FOR THE PREVEN- 
TION OF TUBERCULOSIS (May 13, 1910): 
Executive Office: — 156 East 5th Street. President: — E. P. Selden. Secretary: 
— M. A. Auerbach. 

185 



ASSOCIATIONS PENNSYLVANIA 

HARRISBURG 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY OF HARRISBURG AND VICINITY 

(1905): 
President: — Charles A. Kunkel. Secretary: — Dr. J. W. EUenberger, 922 North 3rd 
Street. 

HAZLETON 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE OF THE UNITED CHARITIES (May 9, 1908): 
Secretary: — E. P. Kisner. 

LANCASTER 

SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS IN LANCASTER 

CITY AND COUNTY (March 13, 1908): 
President: — Richard M. Reilly. Secretary :— C. B. HoUinger, 41 North Queen Street. 

OXFORD 

OXFORD ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(May, 1908): 
President: — Rev. C. B. Cross. Secretary: — Mrs. F. J. Lyons. 

PHILADELPHIA 

THE HENRY PHIPPS INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY, TREATMENT, AND 
PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (February i, 1903; became a department 
of the University of Pennsylvania, July i, 1910) : 
Executive Office: — 238 Pine Street. Sociological and Executive Director: — Alex- 
ander M. Wilson. Clinical Director : — Dr. H. R. M. Landis. Director of Laboratory : — 
Dr. Paul A. Lewis. 

PITTSBURG 

PITTSBURG TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION (February 13, 1909): 
Executive Office: — 507 Nixon Building. Chairman: — Dr. E. R. Walters. Secre- 
tary: — James D. Crawford. Note: — The other members of the Commission are: Dr. 
WiUiam Charles White, Joseph Reiman, Dr. Stanley H. Rinehardt, and Dr. T. S. Arbuthnot. 

THE TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF PITTSBURG (May 14, 1908): 
Executive Office: — Bedford Avenue and Wandless Street. President: — J. Ramsey 
Speer. Secretary: — J. M. Jenkinson. Medical Director: — Dr. William Charles White. 

POTTSVILLE 

SCPIUYLKILL COUNTY BRANCH OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY FOR 

THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (February 28, 1908): 
President:— Edmund D. Smith. Secretary:— Dr. G. R. S. Corson, 212 W. Market 
Street. 

READING 

THE BERKS COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY Qune i, 1909): 
Executive Office:— in North 6th Street. President: — Hon. H. Willis Bland, 533 
Franklin Street. Secretary: — C. A. Maurer. 

SCRANTON 

SCRANTON SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND CURE OF CONSUMP- 
TION (January 26, 1903): 
President :— Dr. A. J. Connell. Secretary:— Dr. J. M, Wainwright, 436 Wyoming 
Avenue. 

186 



ASSOCIATIONS , PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, PORTO RICO 

WILKES-BARRE 

THE WYOMING VALLEY SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION AND TREAT- 
MENT OF TUBERCULOSIS (July 6, 1906): 

Executive Office: — 56 South Pennsylvania Avenue. President: — Maj. Irving A. 
Stearns. Secretary: — Dr. Charles H. Miner. 

WILKINSBURG 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF WILKINSBURG (February, 1908): 
Chairman: — Dr. A. D. Varner. Secretary: — S. H. Jackson. 

WILLIAMSPORT 

LYCOMING COUNTY BRANCH OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY FOR 

THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (April, 1910): 
President: — John G. Reading. Secretary: — Jennie L. Simmons, 613 Cemetery Street. 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (July 29, 1910): 
Executive Office : — 105 Escolta, Manila. President: — Mrs. Eleanor Franklin Eagan, 
81 Looban Paco, Manila. Secretary: — Dr. Oliver Salamanca, Cavite. 



PORTO RICO 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF PORTO RICO (March 31, 1906): 
President: — Miss Margery Colton. Secretary: — Mrs. Pedro De Castro. Vice- 
President and Medical Director: — Dr. Pedro Gutierrez tgaravidez, San Juan. 



ARECIBO 

ARECIBO BRANCH OF THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF PORTO 

RICO (February, 1909): 
President: — Dr. Fernando Aleman. Secretary: — Dr. Miguel Roses. 

PONCE 

PONCE BRANCH OF THE PORTO RICO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE 

(March, 1909): 
President: — Mrs. Teresa C. De Antonsanti. Corresponding Secretary: — Mrs. De 
Zoilo Cintron, Box 345. 



187 



ASSOCIATIONS RHODE ISLAND 

RHODE ISLAND 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

RHODE ISLAND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (September 30, 1907): 
Executive Office: — 55 Eddy Street, Providence. President: — James R. MacColl. 

Secretary : — Wallace Hatch. 



BURRILLVILLE 

BURRILLVILLE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December, 1909): 
President:— Dr. H. L. Barnes, Wallum Lake. Secretary: — Mrs. Francis Hoj'c, 
Nasonville. 

CRANSTON 

CRANSTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (April 27, 1910): 
President: — Richard W. Jennings, P. O. Box 525, Providence. Secretary: — Mrs. 
George J. Arnold, 219 Warwick Avenue, Edgewood. 

EAST GREENWICH 

THE VISITING NURSE AND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLATION OF 

EAST GREENWICH AND APPANAUG (April, 1910): 
President: — Howard V. Allen, Box V. Secretary: — Mrs. Lydia K. Kendall. 

EAST PROVIDENCE 

EAST PROVIDENCE DISTRICT NURSING AND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS 

ASSOCIATION (April, 1910): 
President: — Frank T. Easton. Secretary: — Mrs. George F. Rooke, Riverside. 

JAMESTOWN 

JAMESTOWN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (July 21, 1910): 
Chairman :— Dr. E. C. Bullard. Secretary:— Miss Alice W. Cottrell. 

LITTLE COMPTON 

LITTLE COMPTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (1910): 
Chairman: — Rev. Joseph Lambert. Secretary: — Miss Deborah Manchester. 

MIDDLETOWN 

MIDDLETOWN TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (July 28, 1910): 

Chairman: — Rev. Clayton E. Delamater, Wyatt Road. Secretary: — Mrs. Elisha 

Angell Peckham, 298 Melville Station, Newport. 

NEWPORT 

NEWPORT ASSOCLATION FOR THE RELIEF AND PREVENTION OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (March 19, 1904): 

Executive Office:— 263 Thames Street. President:— Dr. C. F. Barker. Secre- 
tary:— Miss Mary K. Akerley. 

NEW SHOREHAM 

NEW SHOREHAM ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (1911): 
Chairman :— Ralph C. Dodge. Secretary :— Mrs. C. C. Ball. 

188 



ASSOCIATIONS RHODE ISLAND 

NORTH KINGSTON 

VISITING NURSE AND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION OF NORTH 
KINGSTON (January 17, 191 1): 

President:— Dr. Harold Metcalf. Secretary: — Mrs. Richard R. Graham, Saint 
Paul's Rectory, Wickford. 

PAWTUCKET 

SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS IN PAW- 
TUCKET AND VICINITY (May i, 1908): 

Executive Office:— 209 Oak Hall Building. President: — Albert J. Thornley. Sec- 
retary: — Dr. John H. Bennett. Executive Secretary: — Edward Hochhauser. 

PAWTUXET VALLEY (See Riverpoint) 

PORTSMOUTH 

PORTSMOUTH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (1910): 
Chairman : — Dr. Minot A. Steele. Secretary : — Mrs. Walter Chase. 

PROVIDENCE 

LEAGUE FOR THE SUPPRESSION OF TUBERCULOSIS (November, 1906) : 
Executive Office: — 55 Eddy Street. Chairman: — Dr. Jay Perkins. Secretary: — 
James Minnick. 

RIVERPOINT 

VISITING NURSE AND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION OF THE 
PAWTUXET VALLEY (June 3, 1908) : 

President: — James T. Ferguson, Centerville. Secretary: — Bessie W. Allen, River- 
point. 

SOUTH KINGSTOWN 

SOUTH KINGSTOWN HEALTH LEAGUE (February 6, 1905): 
President: — Dr. Henry B. Potter, Wakefield. Secretary: — Bemon E. Helme, Kings- 
ton. 

TIVERTON 

TIVERTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMMITTEE (July 15, 1910): 
Secretary: — Rev. Robert D. Frost, Tiverton Four Corners. 

WESTERLY 

COMMITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS IN WESTERLY, 

A COMMITTEE OF THE VISITING NURSE ASSOCL^TION (October 12, 

1910): 
Chairman: — William L. Clark. Secretary: — Helen Segar, 6 Elm Street. 

WOONSOCKET 

THE WOONSOCKET ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (April 2,1908): 
President: — Dr. William C. Monroe. Secretary: — F. W. Park, 87 Main Street. 



189 



ASSOCIATIONS SOUTH CAROLINA, TENNESSEE 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

ABBEVILLE 

ABBEVILLE SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (Jan- 
uary 26, 1909): 
President:— Dr. G. A. Neuffer. Secretary :—W. R. Bradley. 

AIKEN 

AIKEN COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (January 17, 1909): 
President :— Dr. Filmore Moore. Secretary :— Dr. G. A. Milner. District Nurse :— 

Miss Susan S. Ravenel, Box 335. 

ANDERSON 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF ANDERSON COUNTY (January 19, 1909): 
President:— Mrs. J. R. Vandiver. Secretary:— Miss Lois Watson. 

CHARLESTON 

CHARLESTON SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(December 6, 1909): 
President:— Dr. J, L. Dawson, 82 Tradd Street. Secretary:— Dr. J. C. Sosnowski, 
98 Wentworth Street. 

NEWBERRY 

NEWBERRY COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (January 29, 1909): 
President:— Dr. P. G. Ellisor. Secretary :— Mrs. Robert D. Wright, 1710 College 

Street. 

ROCK HILL 

ROCK HILL ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCI/^TION (January 19, 1909): 
President :— Dr. J. R. Miller. Secretary :— Major W. W. Boyce. 

SALUDA 

SALUDA COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (April, 1909): 
President: — Dr. J. J. Kirksey. Secretary :— Miss Leilah Attoway. 

SPARTANBURG 

SPARTANBURG HEALTH LEAGUE (August 27, 1909). 
President: — Dr. L. Rosa H. Gantt. 

SUMTER 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCLATION OF SUMTER COUNTY (January 

30, 1909): 
President:— Mrs. H. W. Beall. Secretary :—H. W. Beall. 



TENNESSEE 
BRISTOL 

BRISTOL ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (April 30, 1908): 
President:— Dr. John H. Caldwell. Secretary :— Rev. K. Y. Umberger. 

190 



ASSOCIATIONS TEXAS, VIRGINIA 

CHATTANOOGA 

TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM ASSOCIATION (May, 1909): 

President : — Mrs. A. J. Gahagan. Secretary : — Mrs. J. B. Rowles, 419 Lookout Street. 

GALLATIN 

SUMNER COUNTY HEALTH LEAGUE (April 16, 1909): 
President:— Dr. F. H. Dunklin, R. F. D. No. 3. 

KNOXVILLE 

KNOXVILLE ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF 

TUBERCULOSIS (June 10, 1908) : 
President : — Dr. H. P. Coile. Secretary : — C. M. HimeL 

NASHVILLE 

NASHVILLE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (June 30, 1906): 

Executive Office: — City Hall. President: — Leland Hume. Executive Secretary: 

— John D. Strain. 

SMITHVILLE 

SMITHVILLE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (May, 1907): 
President: — Dr. Thomas J. Potter. Secretary: — Eugene Hendon. 



TEXAS 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

TEXAS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (September 27, 1908): 
President: — J. W. Graves, Austin. Secretary: — Dr. L. B. Bibb, Austin. 



VIRGINIA 



STATE ASSOCLATION 

VIRGINIA. ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (October, 1909): 
Executive Office: — mo Capitol Street, Richmond. President: — Hon. W. W. Baker, 
Hallsboro. Executive Secretary: — Dr. D. S. Freeman. 



ALEXANDIOA 

ALEXANDRIA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (February, 1910): 
President: — Miss Rose M. MacDonald. 

CHARLOTTESVILLE 

CHARLOTTESVILLE PUBLIC HEALTH AND DISTRICT NURSE ASSOCIA- 
TION (January, 1910): 
President: — C. W. Hulfish. Corresponding Secretary: — Miss Hubbard, University 
P. O. 

191 



ASSOCIATIONS WASHINGTON 

DANVILLE 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF DANVILLE (1907): 
President:— Dr. E. P. Beadles. Secretary:— W. H. Davis. 

LYNCHBURG 

TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF LYNCHBURG (190S): 

President: — Mosby G. Perrow, Ph.D. Secretary-Treasurer: — Frank Hall. 

NORFOLK 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF NORFOLK (1906): 

President: — B. P. Loyall. Secretary-Treasurer: — Dr. Charles R. Grandy, loi 
Freemason Street. 

PETERSBURG 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF PETERSBURG (March 6, 1908): 
President: — H. S. Seward. Secretary: — Mrs. Grover Cleveland Wright. Chair- 
man Board of Directors : — Dr. VV. F. Drewry. 

RICHMOND 

TUBERCULOSIS CAMP SOCIETY OF RICHMOND (1909): 
President: — Edmund Strudwick. Secretary: — Miss N. J. Minor. 

STAUNTON 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF STAUNTON AND AUGUSTA COUNTY 

(December 4, 1909): 
President: — C. R. Caldwell. Secretary: — Dr. Hunter B. Spencer, P. O. Box 192. 

SUFFOLK 

SUFFOLK ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (March 23, 1909): 
President: — Dr. H. M. Campbell. Secretary: — John B. Pinner. 

WINCHESTER 

S. p. LATANE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1910): 
President: — Mrs. H. Douglas Fuller. Secretary: — Mrs. W. D. Smith. 



WASHINGTON 



STATE ASSOCL/VTION 

THE WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF 

OF TUBERCULOSIS (September 12, 1906): 
Executive Office: — 915 Cobb Building, Seattle. President: — Dr. C. Quevli, Tacoma. 
Secretary: — Dr. A. L. Cook. Executive Secretary: — Miss B. I. Beals. 



BELLINGHAM 

WHATCOM COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (April 28, 1910): 
Executive Office: — 305 Sunset Building. President: — Dr. E. C. Ruge. Secretary: 
— Miss E. L. Russell. 

193 



ASSOCIATIONS WASHINGTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

EVERETT 

SNOHOMISH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1908; reorganized April 20, 1910): 
President: — R. J. Fausett. 

SEATTLE 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF KING COUNTY (February i, 1909): 
Executive Office: — 4th Avenue and University Street. President: — Horace C. 
Henry. Secretary: — J.F.Douglas. Assistant Secretary: — W. K. McKibben. 

TACOMA 

PIERCE COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (April, 1910): 
President: — Rev. W. H. Moore. Secretary: — Dr. Marian H. Ober. 

VANCOUVER 

CLARKE COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH LEAGUE (April 8, 1910): 
President: — E.G.Crawford. Secretary: — H.H.Daniels. 

YAKIMA 

YAKIMA COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (May 27, 1910): 
President : — William H. Hassell. 



WEST VIRGINIA 



STATE ASSOCIATION 

WEST VIRGINIA STATE TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (October, 1908): 
President: — Dr. Martin V. Godby, Charleston. Secretary: — Dr. Irene B. Bullard, 
S14 Quarrier Street, Charleston. 



CHARLESTON 

KANAWHA COITNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (June, 1908): 
President: — George S. Laidley. Secretary: — Mrs. Abbie Needham, 30 Bradford 
Street. 

CLARKSBURG 

CLARKSBURG COLORED ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President: — S. P. West. Secretary: — John W. Strange. 

ELKINS 

ELKINS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President :— Mrs. Howard Sutherland. 

FAIRMONT 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF FAIRMONT (April, 1909): 
President: — Mrs. C. O. Henry. Secretary: — Miss Carrie Waggener, 816 Alexander 
Place. 

HINTON 

SUMMERS COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910); 
President: — ^H. Ewart. Secretary: — Dr. Edward Cummings. 

13 . m 



ASSOCIATIONS WISCONSIN 

KEYSER 

KEYSER BRANCH OF THE WEST VIRGINIA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS AS- 
SOCIATION (1909): 
First Vice-President: — Harry G. Fisher. 

MANNINGTON 

MANNINGTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
Pre;ident: — Dr. Phoebe Moore. 

MARTINSBURG 

EASTERN PAN HANDLE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVEN- 
TION OF TUBERCULOSIS (November 28, 1910): 

President: — Dr. M. Virginia IMcCune. Secretary:— Mrs. G. P. Grimsley, East 
King Street. 

PARKERSBURG 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF PARKERSBURG (August 2, 1909): 
President: — N. L. Upson, Grun Street. Secretary: — Miss Nellie H. Taylor, 918 
Market Street. 

WHEELING 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF OHIO COUNTY (May 20, 1909): 
President: — Dr. Plarriet B. Jones. Secretary: — Rabbi Harry Levi, 45 South Broad- 
way. 



WISCONSIN 

STATE ASSOCIATION 

THE WISCONSIN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (June 26, 1908): 
Executive Office: — 314 Goldsmith Building, Milwaukee. President: — Dr. Mazyck 

P. Ravenel. Secretary: — Dr. Clarence A. Baer. Executive Secretary: — Dr. Hoyt E. 

Dearholt. 



BEAVER DAM 

BEAVER DAM ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (191 1). • 
President:— Dr. H. B. Sears. Secretary:— Dr. E. P. Webb. 

BLACK RIVER FALLS 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION OF BLACK RIVER FALLS (December 

16, 1909): 
President: — Bertha Krohn. Secretary: — Elise Homstad. 

EAU CLAIRE 

EAU CLAIRE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (November 14, 1909): 
President: — Dr. E. S. Hayes. Secretary: — Dr. E. L. Mason, 2o6j/^ Barston Street. 

FOND DU LAC 

FOND DU LAC ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1911): 
President: — Mrs, C. F. Libbey. Secretary: — Miss Julia Gibbons. 

194 



ASSOCIATIONS WISCONSIN 

KAUKAUNA 

KAUKAUNA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (191 1): 
Secretary: — Mrs. E. B. McPherson. 

KENOSHA 

KENOSHA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS AND PUBLIC HEALTH LEAGUE (July, 
1908) : 

President: — Dr. G. Windesheim, 255 Main Street. Secretary: — W. H. rurnell, First 
National Bank. 

LA CROSSE 

LA CROSSE COMMITTEE ON TUBERCULOSIS (July 7, 1910): 
Chairman: — E. S. Hebberd. Secretary: — J. L. Utermoehl, City Hall. 

MADISON 

MADISON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (August, 1909): 
President: — Professor William D. Frost. Secretary: — Lester W. Hutchcroft. 

MENOMONIE 

MENOMONIE BRANCH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December 

10, 1909): 
President: — G. A. Works. Secretary: — Louis Ehrhard. 

MERRILL 

COMMITTEE OF SEVEN ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (De- 
cember, 1909): 
President: — Dr. Herbert B. Saylor. Secretary: — Dr. E. B. Owen. 

MILWAUKEE 

MILWAUKEE COUNCIL ON TUBERCULOSIS (1910): 

Executive Office: — 314 Goldsmith Building. President: — Dr. G. E. Seaman, 309 
Goldsmith Building. Secretary: — Mrs. Thomas Spence. 

MILWAUKEE SOCIETY FOR THE CARE OF THE SICK (May, 1904): 
President: — Mrs. I. D. Adler, 175 Prospect Avenue. Secretary: — Mrs. Charles J. 
Chapin, 2018 Grand Avenue. 

PORTAGE 

PORTAGE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1910): 
President: — Mrs. W. E. Clough. Secretary-Treasurer: — F, A. Rhyme. 

PRINCETON 

PRINCETON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1910): 
Secretary: — O. C. Olman. Treasurer: — H. J. Maxwell. 

RACINE 

RACINE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1909): 

President: — Dr. S. Sorenson. Secretary: — Dr. Susan Jones, 700 Park Avenue. 

RHINELANDER 

ONEIDA COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (January, 1908): 
President: — W. E. Brown. Secretary: — F. A. Harrison. 

19s 



ASSOCIATIONS WISCONSIN 

RICHLAND CENTER 

RICHLAND COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (October, 1909): 
President: — John Kirkpatrick. Secretary: — E. G. Doudua. 

SHEBOYGAN 

SHEBOYGAN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (December, 1910): 
President: — Walter J. Kohler. 

STURGEON-BAY 

STURGEON-BAY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (191 1): 
President: — Mrs. W. D. Larkin. Secretary: — Mrs. R. O. Bingham. 

SUPERIOR 

PUBLIC WELFARE ASSOCIATION (October, 1908; reorganized and incorporated 
January, 191 1): 

President : — W. C. Lounsbury, 1518 Tower Ave. General Secretary : — Miss Florence 
Two, loio Hammond Avenue. 

WAUSAU 

WAUSAU ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (April 16, 1910): 
President: — Mrs. W. A. Green, 520 Third Street. 

WAUTOMA 

WAUTOMA ADVANCEMENT ASSOCIATION (1910): 
Secretary: — P. S. Durham. 



196 



Typical Forms of Organization of Asso- 
ciations in the United States 



The following constitutions and by-laws of different kinds of associations in the United 
States are given as types from which those who are organizing new societies may receive 
suggestions. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE NATIONAL ASSO- 
CIATION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 
OF TUBERCULOSIS 

Constitution 

Article I. — Name 

The name of this Society shall be The National Association for the Study and Pre- 
vention OF Tuberculosis. 

Article II. — Objects 

The objects of the Association shall be : (a) the study of tuberculosis in all its forms and 
relations; (b) the dissemination of knowledge concerning the causes, treatment, and preven- 
tion of tuberculosis; (c) the encouragement of the prevention and scientific treatment of 
tuberculosis. 

Article III. — Meetings 

The meetings shall be held at such times and in such places as may be directed under the 
By-Laws. 

By-Laws 

Article I. — Membership 

This Association shall consist of three classes of members: (o) Members; (b) Life Mem- 
bers; (c) Honorary Members. 

(a) Those persons who participated in the organization of the Association at the meeting 
in Philadelphia on March 28, 1904, and such persons as shall from time to time be elected 
by the Board of Directors shall be Members so long as they comply with the provisions of the 
By-Laws. The dues of Members shall be Five Dollars ($5) a year. 

(b) Members may become Life Members upon the payment of Two Himdred Dollars 
($200). 

197 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

(c) Persons distinguished for original researches relating to tuberculosis, or eminent 
as sanitarians, or as philanthropists who have given material aid in the Study and Prevention 
of Tuberculosis may be elected Honorary Members. 



Article II. — Board or Directors 

Section i. The Association shall, at its first meeting, elect a board of thirty directors, 
divided into five groups of six each to serve one, two, three, four and five years, the duration 
of ofiice to be determined by lot; thereafter, retiring directors, who have served a full term of 
five years, shall not be eligible for reelection the year of retirement, provided, however, that 
this restriction shall not apply to the secretary or treasurer. 

The Board of Directors may hereafter, at the annual meeting or at a special meeting of 
the Association, be increased to at least sixty, the additional members to be divided into groups 
in accordance with the provisions of the preceding paragraph of this section and subject to 
the same restrictions. It is furthermore provided that at least one-third of the total member- 
ship of the Board shall consist of laymen. At annual meetings succeeding the increase of the 
Board of Directors to a membership of sixty, twelve directors shall be elected for terms of 
five years, or, in case of vacancies in any of the groups, for such unexpired terms. 

Section 2. The Board of Directors shaU make its own rules; the government of the 
Association, the planning of work, the arrangement for meetings and congresses, and all 
other matters appertaining to legislation and direction shall be in its hands; committees 
shall have the power to execute only what is directed by the Board. 



Article III. — Election of Officers 

The Board of Directors shall annually elect from its own number a President, two Vice- 
Presidents, a Secretary and a Treasurer, who shall be the oflacers of the Association as well as 
of the Board. 

Article IV. — Committees 

Section i. The Board of Directors shall appoint an Executive Committee of seven 
directors, of which the President and the Secretary shall be members ex officio, to which shall 
be entrusted all the executive work of the Association. 

Section 2. The Board of Directors is empowered to appoint representatives on the 
International Committee on Tuberculosis; it shall also from time to time appoint such com- 
mittees as may be necessary for scientific and educational work, and for the holding of meetings 
and congresses. 

Article V. — Quorum 
Seven Directors shall constitute a quorum of the Board of Directors. 



Article VI. — Meetings 

There shall be at least one stated annual meeting of the Association at a time and place 
to be fixed by the Board of Directors. Other meetings of the Association may be called by 
the Board at such times as it shall deem proper. The Executive Committee shall hold stated 
and other meetings as may be directed by the rules of the Board of Directors. 



Article VII. — Moneys 

The moneys received from membership dues and from all other sources shall be used 
for defraying the expenses of the Association, and for furthering its objects under the direc- 
tion of the Board of Directors. 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

Article VIII. — Amendment of Constitution 

Propositions to amend the Constitution may be presented in writing at any meeting of 
the Board of Directors or of the Association; they shall be then referred to the Board of 
Directors for consideration and report. The Board of Directors shall report all propositions 
for amendment, whether submitted to it originally or by reference, at the meeting of the 
Association next following, when action may be taken; provided, however, that no proposi- 
tion for amendment shall be voted upon within thirty days after its presentation, or without 
at least twenty days' notice of the meeting at which it is to come up for consideration, which 
notice shall set forth the proposed amendment in full. An afi&rmative vote of two-thirds 
the members present shall be required for adoption. 



Article IX. — Amendment of By-Laws 

By-Laws may be amended in the same manner as the Constitution or by a two-thirds 
vote of the members present at a meeting of the Board of Directors, provided that in the latter 
case the proposition to amend has been presented in writing at a previous meeting of the 
Association, or of the Board of Directors, and that subsequently to such presentation twenty 
days' notice in writing has been given of the proposed amendment in the call for the meeting. 



Article X. — Advisory Council 

The Advisory Council of the National Association for the Study and Prevention of 
Tuberculosis shall consist of: 

First. Directors of the Association. 

Second. Officers or representatives appointed by various recognized State associations 
for the prevention of tuberculosis, such representatives being required to qualify as members 
of the National Association, the number in any case not to exceed five. 

Third. Officers or representatives of various recognized local or municipal associations 
for the prevention of tuberculosis, such representatives being required to qualify as members 
of the National Association, the number in any case not to exceed three. 

Fourth. A member of the medical staff of every public hospital or sanatorium for the 
exclusive care of tuberculous patients, such member to be designated by the board of trustees 
or other authorities of the hospital or sanatorium, such representative being required to qualify 
as a member of the National Association. 

Fifth. A representative from the board of trustees or other executive authorities of 
approved hospitals or sanatoria for the exclusive care of tuberculous patients, such repre- 
sentative being required to qualify as a member of the National Association. 

Sixth. Representatives of recognized, incorporated charitable societies or associations, 
such representatives being required to qualify as members of the National Association, the 
number in any case not to exceed three. 

Seventh. The president or medical officer of the Health Department of any State or any 
city with a population of more than twenty thousand may become ex officio a member of the 
Advisory Council during his term of office. 

The Advisory Council shall meet at the time of the armual meeting of the Association, 
and at such other times as it may be called together by the Directors or the President of the 
National Association. During the meetings of the National Association the Advisory Council 
shall have regular stated meetings at which members of the Council may bring up for dis- 
cussion, or may present papers, which have been approved, bearing on the administrative 
control of tuberculosis, the management of hospitals and sanatoria, may make recommenda- 
tions to the Board of Directors with regard to the conduct of the National Association, and 
other related subjects. 



199 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE NEW JERSEY ASSO- 
CIATION FOR THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF 
OF TUBERCULOSIS 

Constitution 

Article I 

The name of this Society shall be The New Jersey Association for the Prevention 
AND Relief of Tuberculosis. 

Article II 

The objects of the Association are: 

1. Dissemination of knowledge concerning the causes, treatment, and prevention of 
tuberculosis. 

2. Investigation of the prevalence of tuberculosis in the State of New Jersey and the 
collecting and publishing of useful information. 

3. Securing of proper legislation for the relief and prevention of tubercvilosis. 

4. Cooperation with the public authorities. State and local Boards of Health, the Na- 
tional Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, medical societies, and other 
organizations in approved measures adopted for the prevention of the disease. 

5. Promotion of the organization and work of local societies in aU parts of New Jersey. 

6. Encouragement of adequate provision for consumptives by the establishment of 
sanatoria, hospitals, dispensaries, and otherwise. 



Article III 

The meetings of the Association shall be held at such times and such places as may be 
directed under the By-Laws. 



Article IV. — Amendment of Constitution 

Propositions to amend the Constitution may be presented in writing at any meeting of 
the Board of Directors or of the Association. They shall then be referred to the Board of 
Directors for consideration and report. The Board of Directors shall report such proposition 
for amendment at the next meeting of the Association when action may be taken; provided, 
however, that no proposition for amendment shall be voted upon without at least thirty days' 
notice of the meeting at which it is to come up for action, which notice shall be sent to each 
member and shall set forth the proposed amendment in full. An afl&rmative vote of two- 
thirds of the members present at such meeting of the Association shall be required for adoption. 



Article V 
The names and residences of the incorporators are: 

By-Laws 

Article I. — Membership 

This Association shall consist of three classes of members: (a) Members; (b) Life Mem- 
bers; (c) Patrons. 

(o) Members shall be elected by the Board of Directors and shall be considered members 

200 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

so long as they comply with the provisions of the By-Laws. All persons interested in the 
objects of the Association shall be eligible to membership. The dues of members shall be 
$i.oo per year. 

(b) Members may become Life Members upon payment at one time of twenty-five 
dollars. 

(c) Persons paying at one time two hundred or more dollars into the treasury of the 
Association may be elected patrons and shall have all the privileges of members without the 
payment of dues. 

Article II. — Board of Directors 

Section i. The Board of Directors shall consist of thirty members elected by the Associa- 
tion. The Board shall be divided into five groups of six each, to serve one, two, three, four, 
and five years respectively, the duration of office of the members of the iirst Board of Directors 
to be determined by lot. At each succeeding annual meeting of the Association six Directors 
shall be elected for terms of five years, and in case of vacancies in any of the groups Directors 
shaU be elected for such unexpired terms. 

Section 2. The B6ard of Directors shall make its own rules. The government of the 
Association, the planning of work, arrangement of meetings, the expenditure of moneys, and 
all other matters pertaining to direction shall be in the hands of the Board to execute. 



Article III. — Election of Officers 

The Board of Directors shall elect annually from its own nvmiber a president, two vice- 
presidents, a secretary, and a treasurer, who shall be the officers of the Association as well as 
of the Board. The Board of Directors may from time to time elect from outside its number 
such honorary vice-presidents of the Association as it may deem proper. 



Article IV. — Executive Committee 

The Board of Directors shall appoint annually an Executive Committee consisting of the 
President and Secretary, ex officio, and of five other members of the Board, and to this Com- 
mittee shall be entrusted all the executive work of the Association. 



Article V. — Quorum 
Seven directors shall constitute a quorum of the Board of Directors. 

Article VI. — Meetings 

There shaU be at least one stated annual meeting of the Association, at a time and place 
to be fixed by the Board of Directors. Other meetings may be called by the Board at such 
times as it shall deem proper. 

Article VII. — Moneys 

The moneys received from membership dues and from all other sources shall be used 
for defraying the expenses of the Association and for furthering its objects under the direction 
of the Board of Directors. 



Article VIII. — Amendment of By-Laws 

The By-Laws may be amended by a two-thirds vote of the members present at the -annual 
or a special meeting of the Association or of the Board of Directprs; provided, that no propo- 



ASSOCL^TIONS FOI^IS OF ORGANIZATION 

sition for amendment shall be voted upon without at least twenty days' notice of the meeting 
of the Association or of the Board of Directors at which it is to come up for action, which 
notice shall be sent to each member of the Association or of the Board of Directors and shall 
set forth the proposed amendment in full. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE MISSOURI ASSOCIA- 
TION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF 
TUBERCULOSIS 

Constitution 

Article I. — Name 

The name of this organization shall be The Missouri Association for the Relief and 
Control of Tuberculosis. 

Article II. — Purposes 

Dissemination of knowledge concerning the causes, treatment, and prevention of tubercu- 
losis in the State of Missouri. 

Investigation of the prevalence of tuberculosis in the State and the collection and pub- 
lishing of useful information. 

Securing of the proper legislation for the relief and prevention of tuberculosis. 

Cooperation with the public authorities (State and local Boards of Health), the National 
Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, medical societies, and other organ- 
izations in approved measures adopted for the prevention of the disease. 

Promotion of the organization and work of local societies in all parts of the State; en- 
couragement of adequate provision for consumptives by the establishment of sanatoria, 
hospitals, dispensaries, and otherwise. 

In general, to do all things and acts having as their object the relief of those afflicted with 
tuberculosis and the control and prevention of that disease throughout the entire State. 



Article III. — Meetings 

The meetings shall be held at such times and in such places as may be directed under the 
By-Laws. 

By-Laws 

Article I 

The members of the Association shall be divided into four classes: (a) Member, {b) 
Sustaining Member, (c) Life Member, (d) Honorary. 

Members 

(a) All persons participating in the organization of the Association at the meeting in 
Jefferson City, May isth, 1907, shall be entitled, ipso facto, to membership in this Association. 

(a) All members of the St. Louis Society for the Relief and Prevention of Tuberculosis, 
and all members of other societies, associations, or organizations in the State of Missouri, 
now existing or organized later, for the reUef of consimaptives and prevention of tuberculosis, 
may be entitled upon enrollment to membership. 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

(a) All members of the Missouri State Medical Association may be entitled to member- 
ship upon enrollment. 

(a) Members of the Legislature and all officers of State, county, city, and town govern- 
ments may be entitled to membership upon enrollment. 

(o) All clergymen of all churches and editors of all papers may be entitled to member- 
ship upon enrollment. 

(a) And all other persons interested in the relief, prevention, and control of tuberculosis 
may become members upon receiving the majority votes of the Board of Directors of the 
Association. 

Sustaining Members 

(b) All persons who may contribute or subscribe not less than $2.00 annually to further 
the purpose of this Association are entitled to a sustaining membership. 

Life Members 

(c) All persons who may contribute or subscribe not less than $100 to further the purposes 
of this Association are entitled to a life membership therein. 

Honorary Members 

(d) Persons distinguished for original researches relating to tuberculosis, or eminent 
as sanitarians, or as philanthropists who have given material aid in the relief, prevention, and 
control of tuberculosis may be elected honorary members, upon receiving the majority votes 
of the Board of Directors. 

Article II 

The annual meeting of the Association shall be held on such day in May in each year 
as the President shall appoint, at which meeting Directors shall be elected for the ensuing year. 
There shall be a Director for each State representative district. Only the sustaining and life 
members shall be entitled to vote in person or by proxy. 

A nomination committee shall be appointed by the President to submit nominations 
for the said Directors. 

Local associations, societies, committees, or other organizations shall have the right to 
nominate Directors to represent their respective districts. 



Article III 

Special meetings of the Society may be called by the President, or by the request of ten 
members, by notice mailed to each member at his last known business or residence address 
not less than ten days prior to the time fixed for said meeting, setting forth the time and place 
and object of such meeting. 

Article IV 

The Board of Directors shall meet within fifteen days after each annual meeting of this 
Society, at which time they shall elect ofi&cers and plan the work for the ensuing year. 



Article V 

Meetings of the Board of Directors shall be held as often as may be necessary and may be 
held on call of the President or of the Executive Committee of the Board. 

The Board of Directors shall have power to make all necessary rules and regulations 
for its own goverrmient, to fix the compensation of any ofiicer or employee of the Association, 
to suspend or remove any ofi&cer or employee for neglect of duty or for misconduct, to fill all 
vacancies of o£&ce and have general control of the property and business of the corporation 
and the power and authority to alter or repeal the By-Laws of the Association. 

203 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

All vacancies in the Board of Directors shall be filled by the Board for the unexpired time. 

Five members shall constitute a quorum of the Board of Directors. 

The disbursement of all funds must have the approval of the Board of Directors or of the 
Executive Committee. 

All funds of the Association shall be devoted to such uses as shall be decided upon by the 
Board of Directors, or by the Executive Committee. 



Article VI 

The Executive Committee shall consist of the following: Seven members of the Board 
of Directors, who shall be elected by the Board at its first meeting after the annual meeting 
of the Association, the President, and the Secretar3^ 

Three members of the Executive Committee shall constitute a quorum and supervise the 
affairs of the Society subject to the control of the Board of Directors, and when the Board of 
Directors is not in session the Executive Committee shall have and exercise all powers of said 
Board. The Executive Committee may elect its own chairman, who shall preside at all 
meetings thereof. 

Article VII 

The officers of the Association shall be a President, Vice-Presidents, a Secretary, Trea- 
surer, and Councillors, and such other ofiicers as the Board may deem necessary to elect. 
The Board of Directors shall elect one Vice-President for each Senatorial District and one 
Councillor for each Congressional District. 



Article VTII 

The President's duties shall be those of executive head. He shall preside at all meetings 
of the Society and of the Board of Directors according to the By-Laws and parliamentary 
usage. 

The Chairman of the Executive Committee shall perform the duties of the President 
in the absence of that officer. In the absence or disability of the President and Chairman of 
the Executive Committee, the Vice-President selected by the Executive Committee shall 
perform the executive duties. 

The Secretary shall keep an accurate record of the proceedings of the Association; make 
all necessary reports and statements of the business of the Association; and shall perform all 
duties usually performed by the Secretary of a corporation. It shall be the duty of the Secre- 
tary of the Association to keep the books of the Association, and enter therein the amounts 
and source of all money received by the Association, and the amount and designation of all 
money paid out by the Association. 

He shall receive all funds and deposit them in the bank or trust company designated by 
the Board of Directors, or by the Executive Committee, taking therefor a duphcate deposit 
receipt, receipted by the receiving teller of said bank or trust company. He shall present this 
receipted ticket to the Treasurer, who shall enter the total amount so deposited on the debit 
side of the cash account. 

AU disbursements of the Association shall be made by check signed by the Treasurer 
and countersigned by the President, Secretary, or Chairman of the Executive Committee. 

The Secretary shall do and perform such other work and things as may be by the Board of 
Directors, the Executive Committee, and the By-Laws directed and required. 

_ The Treasurer shall keep a cash book in which he shall enter the amount of all funds de- 
posited and the amount of all funds disbursed. 

It shall be the duty of the Councillors, Vice-Presidents, and Directors to forward the 
organization of local societies, associations, and committees for the rehef and prevention of 
tuberculosis in their respective districts. 



204 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

Article IX 
The Association shall have and adopt a seal, of which the following is an impression: 

[seal] 

Article X 

There shall be the following standing committees to be appointed by the President, on 
nomination of the Board or Executive Committee, each committee to consist of three or 
more members and the Secretary of the Association to be secretary of all committees. 

Finance Committee: To devise ways and means of securing the funds to carry on the 
Society's work. 

Membership Committee: To secure new members of the Society. 

Woman's Auxiliary Committee: To aid and assist the Society in any manner they may 
deem advisable. 

Press and Publicity Committee: To prepare and secure publication in the papers of 
Missoiuri of articles designed to educate the public as to the dangers of tuberculosis and the 
aims and objects of our Society. 

Lectures and Public Meetings: To arrange for and have charge of lectures and public 
meetings, to inform the pubHc as to the dangers of tuberculosis and the aims and objects of 
our Society. 

Literature and Publications: To edit and pubhsh a paper and other publications and liter- 
ature to inform the pubHc as to the dangers of the disease, and the aims and objects of the 
Society. 

Legislation and Law Enforcement Committee: To secure passage of needed legislation and 
the enforcement of existing laws designed to stamp out tuberculosis. 

The Board of Directors may appoint such other committees as they may deem necessary 
from time to time. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE RALLS COUNTY SO- 
CIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS 

Constitution 

Article I. — Name 

The name of this organization shall be The Ralls County Society for the Prievention 
OF Tuberculosis. 

■ This Society shall be affiliated with the Missouri Association for the Relief and Control 
of Tuberculosis, as a member and auxiliary of the Association, and shall be the Ralls County 
Branch of said organization to carry on its work in said county. 



Article II. — Purposes 

Dissemination of knowledge concerning the causes, treatment, and prevention of tubercu- 
losis in Ralls Covmty. 

Investigation of the prevalence of tuberculosis in the coimty and the collection and pub- 
lishing of useful information. 

Securing of the proper legislation for the relief and prevention of tuberculosis. 

Cooperation with the pubhc authorities (State and local Boards of Health), the National 
Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, the Missouri Association for the 

205 



ASSOCIATIONS FORM OF ORGANIZATION 

Relief and Control of Tuberculosis, medical societies, and other organizations in approved 
measures adopted for the prevention of the disease. 

Promotion of the organization and work of local societies in all parts of the county; 
encouragement of adequate provision for consumptives by the establishment of sanatoria, 
hospitals, dispensaries, and otherwise. 

In general, to do all things and acts having as their object the relief of those afflicted with 
tuberculosis and the control and prevention of that disease throughout the entire county. 



Article III. — Meetings 

The meetings shall be held at such times and in such places as may be directed under the 
By-Laws. 

By-Laws 

Article I. — Members 

The membership of this Society shall be composed of those persons interested in the relief, 
prevention, and control of tuberculosis, who shall contribute not less than $i.oo annually 
to further the purposes of this organization. 

Full Membership 

All persons contributing not less than $2.00 annually shall be enrolled as members of this 
organization and as members of the Missouri Association for the Relief and Control of Tu- 
berculosis. Of this amount $1.00 shall be paid annually to the Missouri Association for the 
Relief and Control of Tuberculosis, for the contributor's membership therein. 

Any persons interested in the relief, prevention, and control of tuberculosis, receiving 
the majority votes of the Board of Directors, may be enrolled as members. 



Article II 

The annual meeting of the Society shall be held on such day in May in each year as the 
President shall appoint, at which meeting Directors shall be elected for the ensuing year. 
There shall be one or more Directors from each city or town in the county. The election of 
Directors shall be by ballot and a majority of the votes cast be necessary to elect. 

A nominating committee shall be appointed by the President to submit nominations for 
the said Directors. 

Local associations, societies, committees, or other organizations shall have the right to 
nominate Directors to represent their respective districts. 



Article III 

Special meetings of the Society may be called by the President, or by the request of ten 
members, by notice mailed to each member at his last known business or residence address 
not less than five days prior to the time fixed for said meeting, setting forth the time, place, 
and object of such meeting. 

Article IV 

The Board of Directors shall meet within ten days after each annual meeting of this 
Society, at which time they shall elect a President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer, 
a Medical Director and Medical Staff, and such other officers as may be deemed advisable and 
necessary. 

206 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

Article V 

Meetings of the Board of Directors shall be held as often as may be necessary and may be 
held on call of the President or of the Executive Committee of the Board. 

The Board of Directors shall have the power to make all necessary rules and regulations 
for its own government, to fix the compensation of any ofhcer or employee of the Society, 
to suspend or remove any officer or employee for neglect of duty or for misconduct, to iill all 
vacancies of office and have general control of the property and business of the corporation 
and the power and authority to alter or repeal the By-Laws of the Society. 

All vacancies occurring in the Board of Directors shall be filled by the Board for the unex- 
pired time. 

Any officer or director absent for three consecutive regular meetings of the Board of 
Directors without good excuse may be removed by the Board of Directors from his position 
in the Board and all offices held by him declared vacant. 

Five members shall constitute a quorum of the Board of Directors. 

The disbursement of all funds must have the approval of the Board of Directors or of 
the Executive Committee. All funds of the Association shall be devoted to such uses as shall 
be decided upon by the Board of Directors or by the Executive Committee. 

Article VI 

The Executive Committee shall consist of the following: Four members of the Board of 
Directors, who shall be elected by the Board at its first meeting after the annual meeting of the 
Society, the President, the Medical Director, and the Secretary. 

Three members of the Executive Committee shall constitute a quorum and supervise 
the affairs of the Society subject to the control of the Board of Directors, and when the Board 
of Directors is not in session the Executive Committee shall have and exercise all powers of 
said Board. The Executive Committee may elect its own Chairman, who shall preside at 
all meetings thereof. 

Article VII 

The President's duties shall be those of executive head. He shall preside at all meetings 
of the Society and of the Board of Directors according to the By-Laws and parliamentary 
usage. 

The Chairman of the Executive Committee shall perform the duties of the President 
in the absence of that officer. In the absence or disability of the President and Chairman of 
the Executive Committee, the Vice-President, selected by the Executive Committee, shall 
perform the executive duties. 

The Secretary shall keep an accurate record of the proceedings of the Association, make 
all necessary reports and statements of the business of the Association, and shall perform all 
duties usually performed by the Secretary of a corporation. It shall be the duty of the Secre- 
tary of the Society to keep the books of the Association, and enter therein the amounts and 
soxirce of all money received by the Association and the amount and designation of all money 
paid out by the Association. 

He shall receive all ftmds and deposit them in the bank or trust company designated 
by the Board of Directors, or by the Executive Committee, taking therefor a duplicate deposit 
ticket, receipted by the receiving teller of said bank or trust company. He shall present this 
receipted ticket to the Treasurer, who shall enter the total amount so deposited on the debit 
side of the cash account. 

All funds received by the Secretary will be deposited as hereinbefore provided, in the 
name of the Treasurer, and for the purpose of indorsing all checks he shall have and use a 
rubber stamp, upon which shall be printed the following: 

Ralls County Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis 

Treasurer. 

All disbursements of the Society shall be made by check signed by the Treasurer and 
countersigned by the President or Chairman of the Executive Committee. 

The Secretary shall do and perform such other acts and things as may be by the Board 
of Directors, the Executive Committee, and the By-Laws directed and required. 

207 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

The Treasurer shall keep a cash book in which he shall enter the amount of all funds 
deposited and the amount of all funds disbursed. 

It shall be the duty of \'ice-Presidents and Directors to forward and encourage the 
organization of local societies, associations, and committees for the Relief of Consiunptives 
and Prevention of Tuberculosis, in their respective districts. 



Article VIII 
The Society shall have and adopt a seal of which the following is an impression. 

[seal] 

Article IX 

There shall be the following standing committees to be appointed by the President on 
nomination of the Board or Executive Committee, each committee to consist of three or more 
members and the Secretary of the Society to be Secretary of all Committees: 

Fitmtice Committee: To devise ways and means of securing the funds to carry on the So- 
ciety's work. 

Membership Committee: To secure new members of the Society. 

Press a>id Publicity Committee: To prepare and secure publication in the papers of Ralls 
County of articles designed to educate the pubhc as to the dangers of tuberculosis and the aims 
and objects of our Society. 

Lectures and Public Meetings: To arrange for and have charge of lectures and public 
meetings, to inform the pubhc as to the dangers of tuberculosis and the aims and objects of 
our Society. 

Literature and Publications: To edit and distribute publications and literature to inform 
the public as to the dangers of the disease and the aims and objects of the Society. 

Legislation and Law Enforcement Committee: To secure the passage of needed legislation 
and the enforcement of existing laws designed to stamp out tuberculosis. 

Dairy Inspection Committee: To cooperate with the authorities in a system of inspection 
to prevent the sale of the milk of tuberculous cattle. 

Medical Staff: To supervise and plan the medical work of the Society. The Medical 
Director shall be the Chairman of the Committee. 

Medical Relief Committee of Visiting Physicians: To be composed of all visiting physicians 
appointed by the Medical Staff. The Chief Physician shall be Chairman. 

Sanatorium Committee: To supervise the Sanatorium maintained by the Society. 

Hospital Visitation Committee: To visit hospitals and institutions where consimaptives 
are treated, to encourage, advise and assist them, to cooperate with the management of such 
institutions in the care of such patients. 

The Board of Directors or its Executive Committee may appoint such other committees 
as may be deemed necessary at any time. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE GRAND RAPIDS ANTI- 
TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY 

Constitution 

Article I 
The name of the Society shall be The Grand Rapids Anti-Tuberctjlosis Society. 

208 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

Article II 

The object of the Society is to combat the spread of tuberculosis, to better the condition 
of patients suffering from it, and to promote their recovery. 

1. By enlisting the cooperation of the people in general, the medical profession, and 
nurses in fighting the disease, and preventing the infection of well persons. 

2. By investigating the causes of the prevalence of the disease and by collecting and pub- 
lishing useful statistics. 

3. By disseminating information: (a) to those suffering from the disease, as to the best 
treatment and means of help; (b) to those who come in contact with the disease, as to the 
prevention of its spread; (c) to the public, as to the subject in general and its bearing on the 
social life of the commimity. 

4. By advocating the enactment of appropriate laws for the prevention of the disease. 

5. By the advancement of movements to provide special hospitals, sanatoria, and dis- 
pensaries for consumptives, and also by endeavoring to secirre the better care of consumptives 
in their homes through cooperation with the District Nurses' Association and the Charity 
Organization Society. 

6. By cooperating with the public health authorities, the National Association for the 
Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, and other organizations, in measures adopted for the 
prevention of the disease. 

7. By such other methods as the Society may from time to time adopt. 

Article III 

The meetings shall be held at such times and in such places as may be directed under the 
By-Laws. 

Article IV 
The names and residences of the incorporators are: 



By-Laws 

No. I. — Members 

Section i. Any person who shall pay one dollar ($1) or more into the treasury of the 
Society shall be enrolled as a regular member for the year in which such payment is made. 

Sec. 2. Any person who shall pay $50 or more into the treasury of the Society shall be 
enrolled as a life member. 

No. n. — Officers 

There shall be a President, two Vice-Presidents, a Treasurer, a Secretary, an Executive 
Board of seven members, including the President and Secretary ex officio, and an Advisory 
Board. 

No. III. — Duties of Officers 

Section i. The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary, and Treasurer shall perform 
the customary duties of their respective offices. 

Sec. 2. The Executive Board's duties shall be administrative. 

Sec. 3. The Advisory Board shall consider and offer recommendations on such questions 
as shall be brought before it by the Executive Board. The Advisory Board shall consist of 
the officers, the Executive Board, and members of the regular and special committees. 

No. IV. — Election of Officers 

Section i. The regular officers and members of the Executive Board shall be elected 
by ballot at the annual meeting of the Society. 
14 209 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

Sec. 2. All committees shall be appointed by the Executive Board and all vacancies 
shall be filled by the Executive Board. 



No. V. — CoilUITTEES 

The Executi\'e Board shall appoint such committees as it may deem necessary for the 
proper carrying on of the work of the Society. The size and membership of each committee 
shall be determined by the Executive Board. 



No. VI. — Meetings 

Section i. The annual meeting shall be held during the first week of January at a time 
and place appointed by the Executive Board, due notice to be sent to every member by the 
Secretary at least ten days before the meeting. 

Sec. 2. The Executive Board shaU meet immediately after the adjournment of the 
annual meeting of the Society and at such other times as may be designated by the President 
and Secretary. 

Sec. 3. The Advisory Board shall meet at the call of the Executive Board. 



No. Vn. — Amendments 

The Bj^-Laws may be amended by a majority vote of those present at any annual meet- 
ing, provided that the notice of such proposed amendment shall have been sent to each mem- 
ber with the call of the meeting. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE COLUMBUS SOCIETY 

FOR THE PREVENTION AND CURE OF 

TUBERCULOSIS 

Constitution 

Article I 

The name of this Society shall be The Columbus Society for the Prevention and 
Cure of Tuberculosis. 

Article II 

This Society is formed for the purpose of preventing tuberculosis: (i) by promulgating 
the doctrine that tuberculosis is a commmiicable disease; (2) by instructing the public in 
practical methods of avoidance and prevention; (3) by visiting the consumptive poor and 
supplying them with the necessary materials with which to protect themselves and others 
against the disease, and instructing them in their use; (4) by furnishing the consumptive 
poor with hospital and dispensary treatment; (5) by co-operating with Boards of Health in 
such measures as they may adopt for the prevention of the disease; (6) by advocating the 
enactment of appropriate laws for the prevention of the disease; (7) by such other methods 
as the Society may from time to time adopt. 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

By-Laws 

Article I. — Members 

Section i. Any person who shall pay $i.oo or more into the treasury of this Society 
shall be enrolled as a member for the year in which such payment is made. 

Sec. 2. Any person residing beyond the limits of Columbus, whose name shall be pre- 
sented to the Board of Managers and elected by them may be enrolled as an Associate Member 
upon the payment of $5.00 annually. 

Article II. — Officers 

Section i. The Ofi&cers of this Society shall be a President, three or more Vice-Presi- 
dents, a Recording and a Corresponding Secretary, a Treasurer, a Medical Director, and a 
Board of Managers. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the President to preside at all meetings of the Board of 
Managers, and shall, unless other order be made, appoint all committees thereof. In the 
absence of the President, or in case of vacancy in the ofiSce, the powers and duties shall 
devolve upon the Vice-Presidents in the order of their election. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall record the minutes of the meetings of the Board 
of Managers, and of the Society, and shall send notice of the bi-monthly meetings to the 
members of the Board. 

Sec. 4. The Corresponding Secretary shall attend to all the correspondence of the 
Society, and shall send the notice of the annual meetings to the members. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall receive all money, or other property, pay all bills, subject 
to the order of the President, or of the Board of Managers. 

Sec. 6. The Medical Director shall provide for medical attendance at the Dispensary 
and Camp, and have charge thereof as regards the treatment and care of patients, including 
visitations at their homes. 

Sec. 7. The Board of Managers shall consist of not more than one hundred members, 
including the ofi&cers. It shall have control of the business of the Society and of the expendi- 
ture of its funds, except when authorizing the President to audit bills; and it shall appoint 
such subordinate ofificers, agents, or nurses as shall be necessary to carry out the work of the 
Society. 

Article III. — Committees 

Section i. There shall be five, or more, standing committees, as follows: 
Dispensary. 
Educational. 
Sanitary. 

Factories and Workshops. 
Finance. 

Executive Committee. 
Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the Dispensary Committee to provide for all the necessities 
of the consultation rooms, ofifices, loan closet and day camp. 

Sec. 3. The Educational Committee shall arrange for lectures, and shall prepare and 
distribute literature for the purpose of warning and teaching the public. 

Sec. 4. The Sanitary Committee shall attend to the fumigating and sanitation of the 
homes of the patients. 

Sec. 5. The Factories and Workshops Committee shall attend to the better sanitation 
of the buildings and the better instruction of the workmen, including change of employment. 
Sec. 6. The Finance Committee shall provide the necessary means for carrying on the 
work of the Society. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to have charge of the executive 
work of the Board of Managers during the interim between meetings. 

Sec. 8. It shall be the duty of each chairman of these committees to attend the meetings 
of the Board of Managers to report upon the work of his committee. In the event of his 
absence a member of the committee shall be selected to act in his stead. 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

Article IV. — Meetings 

Section i. The annual meeting of the Society shall be held on the first Wednesday in 
November. 

Sec. 2. The Board of Managers shall meet regularly on the first Wednesday of every 
second month at 4 o'clock, beginning December the fifth, 1906. Nine members shall con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of general business. 

Sec. 3. The Secretary shall call a special meeting of the Board of Managers at the 
written request of three members, or by instruction of the President. 



Article V. — Elections 

Section i. All elections shall be by ballot. After the first year the OflScers and Board of 
Managers shall be elected annually at the meeting of the Society in November. All vacancies 
shall be filled by the Board until the next annual meeting. 



Article VI. — Amendments and By-Laws • 

Section i. New By-Laws may be adopted, or amendments made by a majority vote 
of those present at any regular meeting of the Board of Managers. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE AMSTERDAM COM- 
MITTEE ON THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 
OF THE NEW YORK STATE CHARITIES 
AID ASSOCIATION 

Constitution 

Article I. — Name 

The name of the organization shall be the Amsterdam Committee on the Prevention of 
Tuberculosis of the State Charities Aid Association. 



Article II. — Purpose 

The purpose of the organization shall be to prevent the spread of tuberculosis and to pro- 
vide for the care and relief of those suffering therefrom. 



Article III. — Membership 

The Committee shall receive its appointment from the Board of Managers of the State 
Charities Aid Association, and shall work under the general direction and control of the Board 
of Managers. 

New members may be proposed by any member of this Committee, who shall send the 
name of the proposed member to the Chairman of the Executive Council, which Coimcil is 
provided for in Article VII of this Constitution. If approved by the Executive Council, 
the name of the person proposed is submitted to the Board of Managers of the State Charities 
Aid Association, who will notify the person of his appointment. 



ASSOCIATIONS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION 

Article IV. — Officers 

The ofl&cers of this Committee shall be a President, five Vice-Presidents, a Secretary and 
a Treasurer, who shall be elected at the annual meeting of the Committee. In case of a 
vacancy in any office, a successor for the remainder of the year shall be appointed by the 
Executive Council. 

Article V. — Duties of Officers 

The duties of the officers shall be those which usually devolve upon the officers in similar 
organizations. But the President shall appoint annually the chairmen of the various sub- 
committees, and with the advice of chairmen and the other officers, shall appoint the members 
of the said sub-committees. 



Article VI. — Sub-committees — Their Duties 

There shall be the following sub-committees: 

1. Dispensary, Class and Visiting Nurses, 

2. Legislation and Municipal Regulation. 

3. Sanatorium Treatment of Incipient Cases, Relief and After Care. 

4. Hospital Care for Advanced Cases. 

5. Education and Publicity. 

6. Simuner and Day Camps. 

7. Finance. 

The duties of each of these sub-committees is to bring about and to make operative, 
as soon as practicable, that portion of the Constructive Program which the Executive Council 
shall determine to be within its province. These sub-committees shall make their own work 
as they see fit, but subject to general regulation by the Executive Council and the General 
Committee. 

Article VII. — Executive Council 

There shall be an Executive Council composed of the officers of the General Committee 
and the chairmen of the various sub-committees. The President and Secretary of the General 
Committee shall be President and Secretary of the Executive Council. 

It shall be the duty of the Executive Council to define and adopt such general course of 
action as may best promote the objects of the General Committee, and to devise ways and 
means for increasing its efficiency. 

The Executive Council shall hold its meetings on the of each month. 

The Chairman of the Committee may call a special meeting at his discretion or upon a written 
request of three members he shall call such meetings of the Executive Council. 

The Executive Council shall make its own By-Laws and shall report in writing at the 
annual meeting of the Committee, and shall submit a copy of the annual report to the Tubercu- 
losis Committee of the State Charities Aid Association. 



Article VIII. — Meetings 

The annual meeting of the General Committee shall be held during the first week in March 
and shall meet at such other time as the Executive Council may direct, or upon the written 
request of five members, the chairman shall call a special meeting. One-third of all the mem- 
bers shall be necessary at any meeting to constitute a quorum. 

Article IX. — Constitution and By-Laws 

The By-Laws, Rules and Regulations adopted by the Executive Council and the various 
sub-committees must be in accordance with and subordinate to the Constitution and By-Laws 
of the General Committee. The Constitution and By-Laws of the General Committee must 
be in accordance with and subject to the By-Laws of the State Charities Aid Association. 

213 



ASSOCIATIONS FORIMS OF ORGANIZATION 

Article X. — .\mendments 

This Constitution may be amended by a two-tliirds vote of the members present at any 
meeting regularly called, provided that in the call it is stated that it is proposed to amend 
the Constitution at such meeting and indicating in what respect. 



By-Laws 

I. — Meetings 

The regular monthly meetings of the Executive Council shall be held on the 
of each month at at the 



11. — Order of Business 

The following shall be the order of business at the monthly meetings of the Executive 
Council. 

1. The Secretary shall read the minutes of 'the last preceding meeting. Action thereon. 

2. The Secretary shall present the report of the Executive Council. Action thereon. 

3. The Secretary shall read any communication from the Board of Managers or Secre- 
tary of the State Charities Aid Association. 

4. Reports from Standing Committees and action thereon. 

5. Reports from Special Committees, if any, and action thereon. 

6. Unfinished business. 

7. New business. 

This order of business may be altered at the discretion of the presiding officer. 



III. — Amendments 

These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Executive Council by a 
two-thirds vote of tlie members present. 



214 



Legislation Affecting Tuberculosis 

in the 

United States 

INCLUDING AN OUTLINE OF THE ACTIVITIES OF STATE 
AND LOCAL BOARDS OF HEALTH 



Legislation Affecting Tuberculosis in 
the United States 

INCLUDING AN OUTLINE OF THE ACTIVITIES OF STATE 
AND LOCAL BOARDS OF HEALTH 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

In addition to the work of the various private organizations in the campaign 
against tuberculosis, there is a large amount of official activity, both State and 
municipal. 

The following section summarizes the legislation affecting tuberculosis 
passed by the different State legislatures; the activities of State health depart- 
ments; the ordinances and regulations adopted by cities of 30,000 population 
and over; and an outline of the work done by these municipalities. The infor- 
mation concerning State legislation has been procured, for the most part, 
from the officials of the State health departments. The information con- 
cerning municipal legislation was secured chiefly through correspondence with 
the various local health officers. 

Under the sections on State Legislation, the information has been arranged 
in chronological order so far as possible. The figures in parenthesis after each 
city indicate the population for 1910, according to the United States Census. 
A number of cities with a population of over 30,000 were circularized, from 
whom no information has been received. There are a few cities with a popula- 
tion of less than 30,000 where there is a considerable amoimt of official anti- 
tuberculosis activity, but these are not included in this section of the Directory. 
For further information concerning institutions conducted by States or cities, 
see the other sections of the directory. 

After giving a detailed account of the tuberculosis activity in States and 
cities, a few typical laws and ordinances of various kinds are given in full. 
These laws are printed as examples from which individuals and State or private 
bodies may receive suggestions in framing bills and ordinances. 



217 



LEGISLATION UNITED STATES, ALABAMA 

UNITED STATES 
NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

1906. — On Februaty 28, 1906, President Roosevelt issued an executive order requiring 
that persons afflicted with tuberculosis, who were working in the government in 
any of its departments, should follow certain rules and regulations tending to pre- 
vent the spread of tuberculosis among their fellow-employees. The three rules 
which must now be observed by all government employees in all branches of the 
service are: First, all persons who are employed in the government service are 
positively forbidden to spit on the iloors; second, the tuberculous emploj^ee must not 
spit in the pubHc spittoons, but must provide himself with an individual sputiun 
receiver; third, all tuberculous employees must also provide their own drinking 
glasses, soap, and towels, and they shall not use any others. This notice also pro- 
vides that notices be posted in all government buildings forbidding promiscuous 
spitting, and that special provision be made for the sanitation and ventilation of 
all government buildings, and further states, "Persons in government employ 
who suffer from tuberculosis shall be separated when possible from others while 
at work." 

1907. — The 59th Congress passed a resolution providing that the Commissioner of Indian 
Affairs, under direction of the Interior, make an investigation and report to Congress 
on the desirabiUty of estabhshing a sanatorium for the treatment of Indians afflicted 
with tuberculosis. 

1910. — As a result of the investigation made by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Con- 
gress appropriated $40,000 for use in work against tuberculosis and trachoma in 
1911. Five sanatoria for tuberculous Indians have been opened on reservations or 
schools at Fort Lapwai, Idaho, Chemawa, Oregon, Laguna, New Mexico, and Fort 
Apache and Phoenix, Arizona. A physician also visits the various Indian schools 
and agencies and by lectures and in other ways instructs the pupils and employees 
in prevention of tuberculosis. 

Three large sanatoria are conducted by the Federal Government, one by the 
United States Pubhc Health and Marine Hospital Service at Fort Staunton, New 
Mexico; one by the War Department at Fort Bayard, New Mexico; and one by 
the Navy Department at Las Animas, Colorado. 

The United States Pubhc Health and Marine Hospital Service has made and 
pubhshed several studies on various phases of the tuberculosis problem. 

For legislation affecting the District of Columbia, see District of Columbia. 



ALABAMA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1907. — An act was passed providing for the establishment of a State sanatorixmi. Forty 
thousand dollars was appropriated, this money to be made available at the discre- 
tion of the Governor, when in his opinion there might be sufficient funds in the trea- 
sury. A board of five trustees was appointed in 1908 to select a site and superin- 
tend erection of the sanatorium. 

1907. — An act was passed naming the diseases to be reported and including tuberculosis 
in the list. 

1908. — Governor Noel, in a message to the Legislature on March 16, 1908, urged the 
appointment of a State lecturer under the Board of Health to educate the people 
with regard to tuberculosis. State Health Officer: — Dr. W. H. Sanders, Mont- 
gomery. 

218 



LEGISLATION ARIZONA, ARKANSAS, CALIFORNIA 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

BIRMINGHAM (132,685) 

A general anti-spitting ordinance was passed several years ago. Physicians are required 
to report cases of tuberculosis by an ordinance of 1904. Premises are disinfected at death 
and removal. Health Officer : — Dr. Robert Nelson. 

MONTGOMERY (38,136) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1903. An ordinance requires tuberculosis to 
be reported as an ordinary infectious disease. Health Department has a tuberculosis clinic 
at its general dispensary and distributes some literature. City Health Officer: — Dr. R. L. 
Milligan. 



ARIZONA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

No laws have been passed affecting tuberculosis. The Board of Public Health, which 
was reorganized in 1907, has made a study of death rates from tuberculosis. Secretary 
State Board of Health:— Dr. Edward S. Godfrey, Jr., Phcenix. 



ARKANSAS 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1909. — A law was passed providing for the establishment of a State Sanatorium and ap- 
propriating $80,000. The sanatorium has been opened at Booneville. 
Secretary State Board of Health : — Dr. J. P. Sheppard, Little Rock. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

LITTLE ROCK (45,941) 

An ordinance against spitting was passed in 1905. On June 4, 1906, tuberculosis was 
included in the list of contagious and infectious diseases to be reported by physicians and house- 
holders. The ordinance of 1906 requires disinfection at death or removal. Secretary 
Board of Health: — Dr. O. K. Judd, 119 Sherman Street. 



CALIFORNIA 

STATE LEGISLATION 

1904. — A bill appropriating $150,000 for a State sanatorium passed both houses of the 
Legislature, but was vetoed by the governor. 

1907. — The Legislature passed a law requiring the notification of tuberculosis, but not 
distinct from other communicable diseases. 

1907. — Legislature passed an anti-spitting law. 
. 1907. — Legislature passed an act appropriating $2,000 for the dissemination of knowledge 
to prevent the spread of tuberculosis. 

1909. — An appropriation of $2,000 was granted to the State Board of Health for a tubercu- 
losis exhibition campaign. A car containing an exhibit has toured all parts of the 
State. 

219 



LEGISLATION CALIFORNIA, COLORADO 

1909. — The State Board of Health was empowered by an act of April 14, to contract for 
the treatment of indigent tuberculous residents in private or public sanatoria, the 
counties in which the patient resides to pay the bills. This act is in force until 
there is established in the state a state hospital for treatment of tuberculosis. 

Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. W. F. Snow, Sacramento. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

BERKELEY (40,434) 

There is no local ordinance, but the State law is enforced. By an ordinance of 1903, 
tuberculosis must be reported, but in 1909 only 14 cases and 49 deaths were reported. Health 
Officer:— Dr. J. J. Benton. 

LOS ANGELES (319,198) 

On December 31, 1896, an ordinance prohibiting spitting in public conveyances, public 
buildings, and on sidewalks was passed. In 1902, tuberculosis was made reportable to the 
Board of Health. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. Printed circulars are 
distributed by the Board of Health. The city employs one nurse. Health Officer: — Dr. 
L. ]\I. Powers. 

OAKLAND (150,174) 

On December 7, 1903, the anti-spitting ordinance of 1899 was amended so as to prohibit 
spitting in any public place. In October, 1902, tuberculosis was classed with other infectious 
diseases and made reportable by physicians and householders. The Health Department 
disinfects after cases of death or removal. Circulars to patients and to physicians are dis- 
tributed by the health authorities. Health Officer: — Dr. Edward N. Ewer. 

PASADENA (30,291) 

There is an anti-spitting ordinance. There is no local registration ordinance. Health 
Officer :— Dr. Stanley P. Black. 

SACRAMENTO (44,696) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed several years ago. Notification of tuberculosis 
cases was requested by the Board of Health in 1907. Premises are disinfected only on re- 
quest. Health Officer : — Dr. WilUam K. Lindsay. 

SAN DIEGO (39,578) 

A limited anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1907. A regulation of the Health De- 
partment of 1900 requires the reporting of tuberculosis with other infectious diseases. Prem- 
ises are disinfected at death and removal of a patient. The Department makes a free 
examination of sputum. Health Officer: — Dr. Francis H. Mead. 

SAN FRANCISCO (425,000) 

On March 15, 1897, an ordinance prohibiting spitting in public conveyances, on side- 
walks, and in public biuldings was passed. On October 27, 1903, tuberculosis was classed as 
an infectious disease and required to be reported. In December, 1909, a comprehensive 
registration ordinance was passed which gives power for compulsory removal of cases. In 
1910 over 1,500 cases were reported. In January, 1911, the Board of Education passed a 
resolution requiring that all new school buildings to be erected should set aside one or more 
rooms for open air school purposes. Premises are disinfected and free examinations of sputum 
made. Health Officer:— Dr. William E. McNutt, Jr. 



COLORADO 

STATE LEGISLATION 

191 1. — A comprehensive registration law was passed. 



LEGISLATION COLORADO, CONNECTICUT 

191 1. — A law abolishing the common drinking cup in public conveyances, schools and 

public places was passed. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. Hugh L. Taylor, Denver. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

COLORADO SPRINGS (29,078) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1907 and amended May 18, 1910. An ordi- 
nance requiring the reporting of tuberculosis was passed May 11, 1909. Premises must be 
disinfected after death of tuberculosis patients. Literature is distributed by the Board of 
Health. Health Officer:— Dr. Omer R. Gillette. 

DENVER (213,381) 

An ordinance prohibiting spitting in public places was passed in 1905. Health Com- 
missioner :— Dr. William H. Sharpley. 

PUEBLO (44,39s) 

On September 11, 1905, an ordinance forbidding spitting in public places was passed. 
Tuberculosis is not officially recognized as a communicable disease. Health Officer: — Dr. 
L. MacLean. 

CONNECTICUT 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1901. — Tuberculosis is reportable, and has been since 1901 by regidation of the Board of 
Health. 

1903. — The Legislature appropriated $10,000 to the Wildwood Sanatorium and has appro- 
priated, up to 1907, $55,000 more. 

1903. — Twenty-five thousand dollars was appropriated toward the building of Gaylord 
Farm Sanatorium, and since that time the Legislature has appropriated, up to 
January i, 1910, an additional sum of $25,000 toward the deficit for maintenance. 

1907. — The Legislature passed a resolution giving the governor power to appoint a com- 
mission of nine to investigate means of preventing or reducing the niimber of tuber- 
ciilous cases. 

1907. — The Tenement House Act of 1907 contains sanitary provisions regarding dwellings 
affecting the tuberculosis campaign. 

1909. — A registration law providing for the reporting and care of all tuberculosis cases was 
passed. 

1909. — An anti-spitting law was passed. 

1909. — An act was passed providing for the estabhshment of coimty sanatoria at state 
expense, and appropriating $175,000 for construction and $75,000 for maintenance. 
Three such hospitals have been erected. 

1909. — $50,000 was appropriated for subsidizing private tuberculosis hospitals. 

Secretary State Board of Health :— Dr. J. H. Townsend, Hartford. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

BRIDGEPORT (102,054) 

In 1899 an ordinance prohibiting spitting in pubhc places was adopted. On April 23, 
1902, an ordinance requiring the reporting of tuberculosis and the disinfection of premises 
occupied by tuberculous cases was passed. The Board conducts a small hospital of twenty- 
four beds. Health Officer : — Dr. E. A. McLellan. 

HARTFORD (98,915) 

By an ordinance of February 3, 1906, a fine of $20 is imposed for spitting in a pubhc 
place. Tuberculosis was declared an infectious disease in 1906 and was made reportable to 
the Board of Health. Premises are disinfected at death and on removal. Printed circulars 



LEGISLATION DELAWARE, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

are distributed in various ways by the Health Department. In June, 190S, a commission was 
appointed by the INIayor to make a systematic investigation of the city and county on matters 
pertaining to tuberculosis. Superintendent of Health : — Dr. C. P. Botsford. 

NEW HAVEN (133,605) 

In 1905 the anti-spitting ordinance was amended to include all public places. In 1905, 
by a special regulation of the Board of Health, tuberculosis was declared an infectious disease 
and was made reportable by physicians and householders. Reporting of tuberculosis was also 
required by State law in 1909. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. The Board 
of Health distributes circulars to tuberculous cases. Health Officer : — Dr. Frank W. Wright. 

WATERBURY (73,141) 

In 1899 an anti-spitting ordinance was passed, but it is not well enforced. There is a 
local ordinance classing tuberculosis with infectious diseases, but the State law is enforced, 
123 cases being reported in 1909. Health Officer: — Dr. Charles Engelke. 



DELAWARE 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1907. — The Legislature of 1907 passed a law making it a misdemeanor to spit on the floor 
of a railway car. 

1909. — A permanent tuberculosis commission was created, and $15,000 was appropriated 
for its work. Besides treating patients at the Delaware Sanatorium and elsewhere, 
the committee has established nine tuberculosis dispensaries. 
Secretary State Tuberculosis Commission: — Dr. H. L. Springer, Wiknington. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

WILMINGTON (87,411) _ 

A comprehensive anti-spitting ordinance was passed in November, 1907. Reporting of 
tuberculous cases has been requested since January, 1908, but it is not required by law. 
Premises are disinfected on death and removal. President Board of Health : — Harrison 
W. HoweU. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBLA 



DISTRICT LEGISLATION 

1897. — The Commissioners of the District issued a police regulation against spitting, which 
was amended in 1903 to include all public places. 

1906. — An executive order was issued by President Roosevelt, looking toward the pre- 
vention of tuberculosis and of its spread among government employees. (See 
National Legislation.) 

1906. — The Commissioner of the District issued an order providing for the inspection of 
buildings, and, with the aid of the other Departments of the Federal Government, 
has helped to carry on the campaign for the prevention of tuberculosis among the 
government employees. 

1906. — The Act, passed by the 59th Congress, "to create a Board for the Condemnation of 
Insanitary Buildings," has had a beneficial effect upon the tuberculosis campaign. 

1906. — Congress made provision for a hospital at a cost of $100,000. The institution 
was opened July i, 1908. 

1908. — A bill providing for the registration of all tuberculous cases, disinfection of premises, 
and free examination of sputum was passed. 



LEGISLATION FLORIDA, GEORGIA 

The Health Department distributes pamphlets on the prevention of consumption. 
For Federal legislation on tuberculosis, see National Legislation. Health Officer of 
the District: — Dr. W. C. Woodward, Washington. 



FLORIDA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1909. — The State Board of Health was given authority by a special act to acquire and 
maintain a sanatorium for the treatment of tuberculosis; to make and enforce rules 
regarding the administration of such sanatorium, and to provide methods for con- 
ducting the same. Owing to a lack of funds, the sanatorium has not yet been 
established. 
The Board issues circulars, posters, etc., on the prevention of tuberculosis. State 
Health Officer: — Dr. Joseph Y. Porter, Jacksonville. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

JACKSONVILLE (57,699) 

There is an anti-spitting ordinance. Tuberculosis was made a reportable disease in 
1909. Premises are disinfected at death or removal." Health Officer: — Dr. Charles E. 
Terry. 

TAMPA (38,524) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed April 3, 1901. Tuberculosis is included in the list 
of contagious diseases made reportable by ordinance of September 13, 1895. City Health 
Officer: — Dr. Shelden Stringer. 



GEORGIA 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1904. — An act was passed providing that the governor appoint a commission consisting of 
one physician from each congressional district, and ten from the State at large, to 
investigate the prevalence of tuberculosis and the means of preventing it, and to 
report to the Legislature in 1905. 
1905. — The Legislature of 1905 authorized the continuance of this same commission, and 
directed that it report to the Legislature in 1906 on the feasibiHty of erecting a 
State sanatorium for consumptives. 
1907. — A bill was passed by the Legislature of 1908, estabHsliing a State sanatorium, and 
providing $ 2 5 ,000 for this purpose. The sanatorium was opened on March 15,1911. 
The State Board of Health has issued educational circulars dealing with tuberculosis, 
but has adopted no anti-spitting or notification regulation. Secretary State Board of 
Health : — Dr. H. F. Harris, Atlanta. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

ATLANTA (154,839) 

There is an ordinance prohibiting spitting on sidewalks and in cars. Notification of 
tuberculosis has been requested for several years. Premises are disinfected at death or 
removal. A municipal hospital was opened on April i, 1911. Health Officer: — J. P. 
Kennedy. 

AUGUSTA (37,826) 

By an ordinance of the Board of Health on September 4, 1905, spitting is prohibited in 

223 



LEGISLATION IDAHO, ILLINOIS 

public places. On September 4, 1905, tuberculosis was included in the infectious diseases to 
be reported. Premises are always disinfected at death and when notice of removal is given. 
A county hospital was opened in 1909. Secretary Health Department: — Dr. E. C. Good- 
rich. 



IDAHO 



STATE LEGISLATION 

There is no legislation affecting tuberculosis. Secretary State Board of Health: — 
Dr. J. L. Conant, Boise. 



ILLINOIS 



STATE LEGISLATION 

189Q. — The State Board of Health was directed by a joint resolution of the Senate and 
House of the 41st General Assembly to investigate the advisability of establishing 
a State sanatorium for consumptives in Illinois. A committee appointed by the 
Board made an exhaustive investigation of the subject, and in a report to the 
governor in December, 1900, the Board strongly recommended the enactment of 
needed legislation. 

1905. — Through efforts made by the State Board of Health, the State medical societies, 
and the State Association for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, the 44th General 
Assembly, in 1905, passed a bill providing for the establishment of a State sanato- 
rium for consumptives, but the appropriation made was too small for any practical 
purposes, and it did not become available. 

1908. — A bill was passed by the Legislature which provided that villages and cities may 
maintain sanatoria, and providing further for the maintenance and regulation of 
the same. The biU does not make it mandatory that such sanatoria be estab- 
lished, nor that tuberculous patients be cared for apart from the other hospital or 
almshouse patients. 

1909. — Amendment to law of 1908, enabling cities and villages to vote on the question of 
levying a tax up to one miU per thousand for the purpose of establishing and main- 
taining tuberculosis sanatoria. 

1909. — County boards were given permission to establish and maintain tuberculosis hos- 
pitals without a referendum vote. 

1909. — Law was passed giving to beneficiary insurance companies the right to maintain 
tuberculosis hospitals. 

1909. — An appropriation of $10,000 was made for a commission appointed to investigate 
the reliability, the efficiency and the necessitj'- of adopting the tuberculin test 
in the State of lUinois, and to investigate and determine whether the tubercu- 
losis germ passes from an animal afflicted with tuberculosis, through the milk; 
and the effect of pasteurizing milk as such food product is pasteurized, bottled, 
shipped, and used in the city of Chicago. 
The Board of Health has issued a considerable amount of literature on the prevention 
of tuberculosis, and has established over two hundred stations in the State where containers 
are kept for the transmission of sputum. Secretary and Executive Officer, State Beard 
of Health : — Dr. James A. Egan, Springfield. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

CHICAGO (2,185,283) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed on February 26, 1906. In 1909 there were 165 
arrests for violation of it. Notification of living cases has been compulsory since 1907. In 

224 



LEGISLATION ILLINOIS, INDIANA 

1909 there were 3074 deaths and 4089 living cases reported. Premises are disinfected at 
death and removal. Circulars are distributed in large quantities to patients and physicians. 
The city of Chicago is building a municipal hospital and operates nine dispensaries for tu- 
berculosis. Cook County has a large hospital in Chicago for advanced cases. A pavih"on 
for tuberculosis cases at the County Infirmary will be opened in 1911. The Board of Health 
supplies tubercuHn free to physicians for diagnostic purposes. Sputum is also examined free 
at the city laboratory. Health Commissioner: — Dr. William A. Evans. 

DECATUR (31,140) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1902. There is no ordinance requiring reporting 
of tuberculosis. Premises are fumigated after death of consumptives, but this is not com- 
pulsory. City Clerk: — Albert Leach. Health Officer: — O. B. Cross. 

EAST ST. LOUIS (58,54?) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1904. A notification ordinance was passed in 
1907. Premises are disinfected on death or removal. Health Commissioner: — Dr. A. A. 
McBrien. 

PEORIA (66,950) 

On August 17, 1897, an ordinance prohibiting spitting in public places was passed. 
A notification ordinance was passed in 1905. Premises are disinfected on death and re- 
moval. Literature for consumptives is distributed by the Department of Health. Com- 
missioner of Health: — Dr. J. Rex ShoU. 

SPRINGFIELD (51,678) 

An anti-spitting act of 1900 was amended on November 18, 1907, to include in its pro- 
hibitions all public places. There is no ordinance requiring the reporting of tuberculosis. 
Premises are disinfected after death or removal of tuberculosis cases. The Department also 
distributes hterature. Superintendent of Health Department: — Dr. George Thomas 
Palmer. 



INDIANA 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1905. — A bill was passed providing that a commission be appointed to investigate the need 
of a tuberculosis hospital and to report on the same in 1907. 

1907. — A bill was passed providing that a commission of five be appointed by the governor 
for three years, to erect a sanatorium for tuberculous patients. This biU carried 
with it a $30,000 appropriation for the site of the hospital. A site was chosen in 

1908 at Rockville. 

1907. — An act was passed making it mandatory for physicians and midwives to report 
all cases of contagious and infectious diseases. The Board of Health includes tu- 
berculosis in this class and requires that it be reported. 

1909. — An appropriation of $130,000 was made for the erection of a State sanatorium at 
Rockville. The institution was completed in June, 1910, but the Legislature of 

1909 failed to make an appropriation for maintenance, and consequently the in- 
stitution was not opened until 1911. 

1911. — ^The Legislature appropriated for the state sanatorium $97,375, and $468 for each 
patient over a daily average of 100. 
The State Board of Health carries on an active campaign against tuberculosis, distrib- 
uting literature and creating public interest by means of lectures, exhibitions, etc. Secretary 
State Board of Health : — Dr. John N. Hurty, Indianapolis. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

EVANSVILLE (69,647) 

Two arrests were made in 1909 under the anti-spitting ordinance passed in 1902. There 

15 ?25 



LEGISLATION INDIANA, IOWA 

is no local ordinance requiring the reporting of tuberculosis, but under the state law 67 cases 
were reported in 1909, with 114 deaths. Health Officer: — Dr. Charles W. Hartloff. 

FORT WAYNE US,ii5) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1904. Health Officer: — Dr. E. A. Crull. 

INDIANAPOLIS (233,650) 

Bj' an ordinance of 1900, spitting in public places is prohibited. Premises are disinfected 
in aU cases of death or removal. The Board of Health conducts a tuberculosis clinic at the 
city dispensary and also a camp at the city hospital. Health Officer: — Dr. Eugene Buehler. 

SOUTH BEND (53,684) 

A comprehensive orciinance was passed in 1906, prohibiting not only spitting in public 
places, but also the throwing away of refuse and food. The reporting of tuberculosis has 
been recommended by the Board of Health since 1902, but there is no ordinance compelling 
this. The Board of Health disinfects in cases of death and removal and also distributes some 
of its own literature and that of the State Board of Health. The County and City jointly 
conduct a tuberculosis colony, in co-operation with the local anti-tuberculosis league. Health 
Officer: — Dr. D. W. McNamara. 

TERRE HAUTE (58,157) 

There is an anti-spitting law passed in 1898. The Board of Health disinfects at death or 
removal. Health Officer : — Dr. T. W. Moorhead, 10 South 8th Street. 



IOWA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1898. — ^The State Board of Health has issued circulars of information respecting tubercu- 
losis since 1898. 

1900. — The Board of Health has a rule providing for the reporting of tuberculous cases. 

1904. — In 1904 a bill was passed providing that the Board of Control of State Institutions 
investigate the extent of tuberculosis and the means of preventing the same. Cir- 
culars were to be distributed and one thousand dollars was provided for experi- 
mentation. 

1906. — An act was passed establishing a State sanatorium for the treatment of tubercu- 
losis, giving the Board of Control power to select the site, construct the building, 
and direct the management of the institution, etc. This bill carried with it an 
appropriation of $50,000. 

1906. — A bill was passed giving the Board of Control funds to print and distribute 5,000 
copies of their report on the extent and prevention of tuberculosis. 

1907. — The Sanatorium Act of the year prior was amended to increase the per capita appro- 
priation to $30 instead of $20; and further to provide for a lecturer to disseminate 
information in regard to tuberculosis; $5,000 annually was appropriated by this 
act. 

1907. — Fifty thousand dollars additional was also appropriated for the State Sanatorium 
in 1907. 

1907. — In August, 1907, the Board of Health made a rule requiring all physicians to report 
cases of tuberculosis. 

1909. — A law permitting the establishing by counties of hospitals for the treatment of 

medical and surgical cases of any kind was passed. Under this law, tuberculosis 

hospitals may be erected after a referendum vote. 

The Board of Control of State Institutions, through its Tuberculosis Department, in 

1908, did a large amount of educational work, and is a very effective factor in the anti-tuber- 

226 



LEGISLATION IOWA, KANSAS, KENTUCKY 

culosis campaign. A. E. Kepford is the lecturer of this department. Secretary State 
Board of Health: — Dr. Guilford H. Sumner, Des Moines. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

CEDAR RAPIDS (32,811) 

A local ordinance of 1905 prohibits spitting, and 26 arrests were made under it in IQ09. 
There is no local registration ordinance. Health Officer :^Dr. J. Hamilton. 

DUBUQUE (38,494) 

A regulation of 1902 prohibits spitting on cars and some public places. There is no 
local registration ordinance. City Health Physician: — Dr. Charles M. Linehan. 

SIOUX CITY (47,828) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed May 2, 1905. By a revised regulation of August, 
1907, tuberculosis is made a reportable disease. Health Officer: — Dr. B. Courshon. 



KANSAS 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1903. — A State anti-spitting law, covering floors of chiurches, schools, or other public build- 
ings, was passed by the legislature in 1903. The Board of Health has another regu- 
lation against spitting on the floors of public buildings. 

1909. — A registration law providing for the reporting of tuberculosis cases was passed. 

1909. — A more comprehensive and stringent anti-spitting law was passed. 

1909. — $20,000 was appropriated to the State Board of Health for a state wide anti-tuber- 
culosis educational campaign for two years. 

1909. — An act regulating the control of tuberculosis in cattle was passed. 

1911. — An act was passed providing for the establishment of a State sanatorium, and ap- 
propriating $50,000. 
Secretary State Board of Health :— Dr. S. J. Crumbine Topeka. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

KANSAS CITY (82,331) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed October g, 1901. There is no local registration 
ordinance. Premises are disinfected at death. Health Commissioner: — Dr. F. Campbell. 

TOPEKA (43,684) 

There is an ordinance prohibiting spitting on stairways and sidewalks. Reporting of 
cases of tuberculosis has been required since 1900. Secretary Board of Health: — Dr. H. 
B. Hogeboom. 

WICHITA (52,450) 

There is a local anti-spitting ordinance. Some literature is distributed by the Board of 
Health. Health Officer:— Dr. F. H. Slayton. 



KENTUCKY 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1906. — The Legislature passed a bill providing that the mayor of Louisville appoint a 
"Board of Tuberculosis Hospital" to erect and maintain a tuberculosis hospital 

227 



LEGISLATION KENTUCKY, LOUISIANA 

for the city and also providing for a tax of one-twentieth to one-fifth of a mill for 
the maintenance of the same. 
1908. — An act was passed "to encourage the estabUshment and maintenance by private 
contributions of sanatoria for the care and treatment of persons suffering from pul- 
monary tuberculosis." The act provides for the appropriation of $25,000 to be 
distributed annually to The Association Sanatorium and other similar institutions 
that might be established, the annual subsidy being 20 per cent, of the money in- 
vested in the equipment of the institution. 
1908-1910. — ^A bill for the establishment of a State sanatorium was passed by both Houses 
of the Legislature of 1908, and again in 1910 but was vetoed by the governor, on 
account of lack of funds. 
The State Board of Health issues circulars on tuberculosis and in igoS started an active 
campaign against this disease throughout the State. State Health Officer: — Dr. J. N. 
McCormack, BowUng Green. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

COVINGTON (53,270) 

There is an anti-spitting ordinance. Reporting of tuberculous cases is required. Prem- 
ises are disinfected at death and removal. Health Officer: — Dr. J. T. Wallingford. 

LEXINGTON (35,099) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in June, 1905. A special registration ordinance 
of May 1, 1908, requires the reporting of tuberculosis. Premises are disinfected at death and 
removal of tuberculous patients. The Board of Health distributes literature. Health 
Officer: — Dr. N. R. Simmons. 

LOUISVILLE (223,928) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1905. Tuberculosis has been reportable 
since 1902. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. Circulars are distributed to 
patients and physicians. The city, in 1908, opened a special tuberculosis annex at the City 
Hospital. Under an act of the Legislature of 1907 the mayor appointed the Board of Tuber- 
culosis Hospital, which has erected a municipal hospital at Waverly Hills. This Board also 
operates a tuberculosis dispensary and is closely allied with the private anti-tuberculosis 
agencies in Louisville. Medical Director Board of Tuberculosis Hospital: — Dr. Dun- 
ning S. Wilson. Secretary Board of Tuberculosis Hospital: — F. A. Sampson. Health 
Officer:— Dr. W. Ed. Grant. 



LOUISIANA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1909. — The State Board of Health adopted a resolution forbidding children suffering from 
any sort of tuberculosis to attend the public schools, and forbidding teachers affected 
with tuberculosis to teach. 

1910. — The legislature granted an appropriation of $5,000 a year for two years for the care 
of tuberculosis patients at one of the State Charity Hospitals. 
Secretary State Board of Health : — Dr. E. S. Kelley, New Orleans. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

NEW ORLEANS (339,075) 

There are two ordinances which prohibit spitting in all public places. Notification was 
made compulsory on May 14, 1907. The city appropriated $1,500 to the Louisiana Anti- 
Tuberculosis League in 1910, and $2,000 in 191 1. Health Officer: — Dr. W. T. O'Reilly. 



228 



LEGISLATION MAINE, MARYLAND 

MAINE 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1889. — The State Board of Health started a campaign against tuberculosis by issuing its 
Circular No. 54, entitled "The Prevention of Consumption." 

1895.-^The legislature passed a law requiring the reporting of cases of tuberculosis to local 
boards of health. 

1900. — The Maine State Sanatorium Association was incorporated for the purpose of pro- 
viding an institution for the treatment of incipient cases of tuberculosis. The 
sanatorium, under the management of this association, was opened at Hebron in 
the fall of 1904. 

1903. — The legislature of 1903 passed a law forbidding spitting in street cars. 

1907. — The legislature made appropriations for the years 1907-1910 for aiding needy pa- 
tients to take the cure at the sanatorium at Hebron, and in 1909 an appropriation 
partly for this purpose and partly to aid in the erection of new buildings was 
made. 

1907.— A resolution was adopted authorizing the construction at Eastern Maine Insane 
Hospital of a building for the isolation of the tuberculous insane, and appropriating 
$30,000 therefore. 

1909. — A comprehensive law relating to tuberculosis drawn up very nearly on the line of 
the New York law, with the exception that cases are to be reported to the State 
Board instead of the local boards, was enacted. 
Secretary State Board of Health : — Dr. A. G. Young, Augusta. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

PORTLAND (58,571) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1900. Premises are disinfected at death and 
removal and owners of premises ordered to repaint and repaper apartments occupied by 
patient. Circulars are also distributed to physicians and patients. The Board of Health 
employs a nurse, who devotes her time exclusively to tuberculosis cases among the poor. 
Considerable anti-tuberculosis agitation is carried on through the newspapers and by lectures. 
City furnishes free tents, etc., for outdoor treatment of tuberculous patients unable to pay 
for construction; also conducts a free general dispensary. Secretary Board of Health: — 
H. T. Waterhouse. 



MARYLAND 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1902. — An act was passed authorizing the governor to appoint a Tuberculosis Commission 
to investigate the means of preventing tuberculosis in the State and the feasibility 
of estabUshing a State sanatorium. Four thousand dollars was appropriated for 
the expenses of this Commission. 

1904. — An act was passed "protecting the public from the negligence of persons affected 
with certain communicable diseases, particularly tuberculosis of the lungs and 
larynx," by prohibiting promiscuous spitting; spitting was declared a nuisance and 
can be proceeded against on the same grounds as any other pubhc nuisance. In 
1902 the Legislature had passed a bill making it a misdemeanor to spit on railroad 
platforms or in passenger cars. 

1904. — The State Board of Health was authorized to issue circidars,$5,ooo being provided 
for this work. 

1904. — In 1904 a law was passed providing for the reporting of tuberculous cases through- 
out the State, and registration by the State Board of Health. 

229 



LEGISLATION IVIASSACHUSETTS 

1904. — A Tuberculosis Commission of five was appointed to investigate the causes of the 
disease and to present a detailed plan for the establishment of a tuberculosis sana- 
torium, and to report to the Legislature of 1906; $2,000 was appropriated for this 
purpose. 

1906. — An act was passed establishing the Maryland Tuberculosis Sanatoriimi; $115,000 
was appropriated by this act. 

1906. — The name of the private corporation called the "Hospital for Consumptives of 
Baltimore" was changed to "Hospital for Consumptives of Maryland," and a 
subsidy of $15,000 for 1907, and $20,000 for 1908, was provided. 

1908. — An additional appropriation of $275,000 was given to the State Sanatorium, and a 
grant of $25,000 to the Hospital for Consumptives of Maryland, for the building of 
a pavilion for advanced cases. 

1908. — The Legislature of 1908 also passed a law prohibiting the importation of cattle 
into the State unless tuberculin-tested. 

1910. — $100,000 was appropriated for the enlargement of the State Sanatorium and sub- 
sidies were granted to the Eudowood Sanatorium. 
The State Board of Health carries on a vigorous campaign against tuberculosis, and 
under a provision of the Act of 1904, has a very complete registration regulation regarding 
tuberculosis. Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. Marshall L. Price, Baltimore. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

BALTIMORE (558,485) 

An anti-spitting law was passed February 21, 1905. By State law notification has been 
required since 1904. Disinfection in cases of death and removal is required by law. By an 
ordinance of May, 1910, a Municipal Tuberculosis Commission was created to "determine 
the best means of restricting and controlling human tuberculosis." The commission sub- 
mitted a preliminary report in the fall of 1910. The Commissioner of Health has power to 
commit a patient suffering with tuberculosis, who, by his habits, endangers the public, to the 
Tuberculosis Hospital at Bay View, which is conducted by the city. The Health Depart- 
ment employs 15 tuberculosis nurses. Commissioner of Health: — Dr. James Bosley. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1895. — A hospital for consumptives was established by an act of the State Legislatiu-e. 
$150,000 was appropriated by this act. 

1898. — An act was passed providing for a loan of $225,000 to complete the above institu- 
tion. 

1900. — ^The name of the State Hospital for Consumptives was changed to State Sanatorium 
for Consmnptives. 

1901. — ^The supervision of the Massachusetts State Sanatorium was given to the State 
Board of Charities. 

1902. — An act was passed reqiiiring that the State Board of Charities report to the Legisla- 
ture of 1903 on the necessity of providing additional sanatoria for consumptives, 
the location most suitable for the same, and the charges for treatment. 

1905. — ^A resolution was adopted authorizing the State Board of Health to give public 
exhibitions of the methods of treating and preventing tuberculosis. 

1906. — A resolution was adopted providing for a commission to consider measures for the 
relief of consumptives in the advanced stages of the disease, and the advisability 
of estabhshing a State Hospital for the same. $5,000 was appropriated for this 
work. 

1906. — An act was passed giving the trustees of the Boston Consumptives' Hospital De- 
partment authority to hire beds in private hospitals pending the erection of their 
new hospital. This act was duplicated in the years 1907 and 1908. 

230 



LEGISLATION MASSACHUSETTS 

1907. — An act was passed providing for the printing and distribution of three thousand 
copies of the report of the above mentioned commission. 

1907. — An act was passed providing that the governor and council appoint a board of nine 
trustees to erect three sanatoria for tuberculous patients, and providing $300,000 
for this work. 

1907. — An act was passed providing for compulsory notification and registration of tu- 
berculosis and other diseases dangerous to the public health. 

1907. — Chapter 183 of the Laws of 1907 authorizes the State Board of Health "to define 
what diseases shall be deemed dangerous to the public health." 

1907. — There is a State anti-spitting law, finally amended in 1907 to cover all public places, 
and providing for criminal process. 

1907. — Chapter 386 of the Laws of 1907 provides that no person, whose care and mainte- 
nance has been incurred on account of tuberculosis, or other contagious and com- 
municable diseases, shall be deemed a pauper thereby. 

1907.— Chapter 445 of the Laws of 1907 provides that each city shall establish and maintain 
within its limits one or more isolation hospitals for the reception of persons having 
smallpox and other diseases dangerous to the public health. Since the State Board 
of Health has placed tuberculosis in this latter class, some cities have assumed it 
mandatory to make special provision for tuberculous patients. 

1907. — Provision was made for State Medical Inspectors of Factories and Workshops. 
They may require changes to improve conditions affecting health. They are es- 
pecially charged to take measures for preventing tuberculosis and to look after 
child employees in poor health. 

1908. — $3,000 was appropriated for preparing an exhibit and otherwise representing the 
state at the International Congress on Tuberculosis. 

1903. — Chapter 42 of the revised laws was amended so that it is now mandatory in public 
schools to give instruction on the prevention of tuberculosis. 

1909.— $15,000 for the finishing of the three State Sanatoria and $30,000 for the mainte- 
nance of two of them was appropriated. 

1910. — A commission to consider the division of hospital work between city and state was 
appointed in accordance with a joint resolution of the legislature. 

1910. — An appropriation of $1,000 was made to carry on a special educational campaign 
in the schools. 
The Board of Health, and the Trustees of the State Hospitals for Consumptives carry 
on a constant campaign against tuberculosis by means of hterature and lectures. Secre- 
tary State Board of Health: — Dr. MarkW. Richardson, Boston. Secretary Trustees 
of Hospitals for Consumptives: — Dr. John B. Hawes, 2d, 3 Joy Street, Boston. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

BOSTON (670,385) 

The Board of Health adopted an anti-spitting regulation on October 13, 1896. Tubercu- 
losis was included in the list of diseases to be reported to the Board of Health in 1900. Prem- 
ises are disinfected at death and removal. Circulars are distributed to physicians and pa- 
tients. The Board of Health does not devote particular attention to tuberculosis. Its 
inspectors visit all reported cases, however, and the Board co-operates with other agencies 
doing tuberculosis work. The real official anti-tuberculosis work of Boston is carried on 
through the trustees of the Boston Consumptives Hospital Department, which was estab- 
lished by an ordinance of 1906, and which expended up to February i, 191 1, $823,668.32. 
A permanent day camp and a hospital for advanced cases have been erected on a five-acre 
tract of land. The Board conducts a dispensary and does a large amount of investigating 
and educational work. A large number of advanced cases are being boarded in local hos- 
pitals until the new municipal hospital is completed. Chief-of-Staff, Boston Consump- 
tives Hospital: — Dr. Edwin A. Locke, 117 Beacon Street. Secretary Health Department: 
— C. E. Davis, Jr. 

BROCKTON (56,878) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed February 11, 1904. Tuberculosis was made 
reportable by an ordinance of February 28, 1907. Premises are disinfected at death and 
removal. Circulars are distributed to patients. Health Officer: — Dr. Fred J. Ripley. 

231 



LEGISLATION MASSACHUSETTS 

CAMBRIDGE (104,830) 

An anti-spitting regulation was passed April 12, 1809. The local Board of Health en- 
forces the State notification law. Premises are disinfected and circulars distributed to physi- 
cians and patients. The Board of Health opened a day camp on July 15, 1908, which has 
since been enlarged into a city hospital for consumptives. Medical Inspector: — Dr. Brad- 
ford H. Pierce. 

CHELSEA (32,452) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1902. Literature is distributed and premises 
are disinfected at death and r'^moval. The Board of Health conducts a tuberculosis clinic. 
Health Officer:— F. E. Winslow. 

EVERETT (33,484) 

An anti-spitting regulation of 1906 prohibits spitting in all public places. By a reg- 
ulation of 1906, pulmonary tuberculosis is declared a communicable disease and is made 
reportable. Fifty-two cases and 35 deaths were reported in 1909. The Board of Health 
distributes literature and disinfects premises at death or removal. Health Officer: — John 
W. Seaver. 

FALL RIVER (119,295) 

An anti-spitting ordinance of 1901 was revised and enlarged in scope in 1906. Signs are 
posted in all factories and on the streets. Employers are obliged to furnish spittoons, which 
are of cheap material, so that they may be destroyed every week. Tuberculosis was made 
reportable on July i, 1906, by a special regulation of the Board of Health. Premises are 
disinfected after death and removal. Literature is distributed to physicians, patients, and 
householders. The Board of Health conducts a hospital for tuberculosis. Agent Board of 
Health: — Samuel B. Morriss. 

FITCHBURG (37,826) 

In enforcing the State anti-spitting law, "No spitting" signs have been posted on all 
principal streets and in all factories. Compulsory' notification of tuberculosis was begun in 
1900. Premises are disinfected and circulars are distributed to physicians, who give them to 
their patients. The circulars are printed in Enghsh, French, and Finnish. Agent Board of 
Health: — Dr. Frederick R. Houghton. 

HAVERHILL (44,115) 

PubUc spitting was prohibited as early as 1902. Notification is required by Board of 
Health regulation of February, 1906. Premises are not disinfected, but circulars of inform- 
ation are distributed. Agent Board of Health: — Chester Bryant. 

HOLYOKE (57,730) 

An anti-spitting law was passed June 11, 1903. Notification has been compulsory since 
November 2, 1905. Premises are disinfected in case of death or removal. The Board of 
Health will build a tuberculosis pavilion in 191 1. Health Officer: — ^J. J. Linnehan. 

LAWRENCE (85,892) 

An anti-spitting regulation was adopted in 1900. A local regulation and the State law 
on reporting of tuberculosis cases are in force, but in 1909 only 126 cases were reported with 
154 deaths. A municipal tuberculosis sanatorium was opened in 1910. The Board also 
distributes literature. Agent Board of Health: — George W. Smith. 

LOWELL (106,294) 

Public spitting is prohibited by a regulation of the Board of Health of August 25, 1903. 
Notification has been compulsory since 1903 by a regulation of the Board of Health. 154 
cases and 159 deaths were reported in 1909. Premises are disinfected at death and removal, 
and the Board of Health also pays for treatment in state sanatoria for indigent residents of 
Lowell. Literature printed in English, Greek, French, Italian, and PoHsh is distributed by 
the Board of Health. Agent Board of Health : — F. A. Bates. 

232 



LEGISLATION MASSACHUSETTS 

LYNN (89,336) . , 

An anti-spitting law was passed in 1906. Notification of tuberculosis has been required 

by a Board of Health regulation since 1906. In 1909 there were 97 deaths and 186 living 

cases reported. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. City Physician :— Dr. 

Joseph F. O'Shea. 

MALDEN (44,404) 

The state anti-spitting law is enforced. The state registration law is enforced, 78 
cases and 44 deaths being reported in 1909. The Board of Health employs a visiting nurse 
and distributes also some literature on tuberculosis. Clerk Board of Health : — Charles 
Lincoln. 

NEW BEDFORD (96,652) 

A campaign against spitting has resulted in a marked improvement in the enforcement of 
the state law on this subject. The city cares for all indigent tuberculosis cases either at 
home or in institutions. Premises are disinfected at death and removal, and a large num- 
ber of circulars, cards, etc., are distributed. Agent Board of Health: — WiUiam G. Kirsch- 
baum. 

NEWTON (39,806) 

Public spitting has been prohibited since 1901. There is a regulation of the Board of 
Health following the wording of the state registration law. Premises are disinfected, and 
literature is distributed to patients, unless physicians request otherwise. Chairman Board 
of Health: — Dr. Francis G. Curtis. 

PITTSFIELD (32,121) 

There is no anti-spitting ordinance. There is no registration ordinance, but 65 cases 
and 41 deaths were reported under the state law in 1909. Health OflBcer: — Dr, G. P. 
Hunt. 

SALEM (43,697) 

The anti-spitting law is not enforced. Metal signs were posted on the street corners 
and in factories in 1908. There is no local registration ordinance. The Board of Health 
disinfects in cases of death and removal. Literature is furnished to physicians and the 
Associated Charities for distribution. In 1910, the Board began a special campaign in the 
schools. The Board of Health has a ward in a city institution for a few advanced cases, and 
also pays for the treatment of a few patients in a private day camp. Agent Board of Health : 
— R. L. Newcomb. 

SOMERVILLE (77,236) 

A regulation against spitting was promulgated on October 6, 1904. By a Board of Health 
regulation, reporting of tuberculosis has been compulsop^ since October 6, 1904. The city 
appropriated $8,700 in 1910 for the erection of a municipal tuberculosis hospital. Premises 
are disinfected and circulars are distributed to patients and physicians. Medical Inspector 
Board of Health : — Dr. Frank L. Morse. 

SPRINGFIELD (88,926) 

Spitting was prohibited in public places by a Board of Health regulation in 190T. Notifi- 
cation of tuberculosis has been required by a regulation of the Board of Health since 1904. 
Premises must be disinfected at death or removal. The Health Department makes free 
examination of sputum and distributes sputum cups, placards, and circulars. They also 
co-operate with the local association. The Department also cares for its indigent cases in 
their homes and at the State Sanatoria. Agent Board of Health: — ^WilUam L. Young. 

TAUNTON (34,259) , . . . 

There is no local anti-spitting ordinance. The state registration law is enforced, 45 

cases being reported in 1909 with 67 deaths. Chairman Board of Health: — Dr. T. J. 
Robinson. 

233 



LEGISLATION MICHIGAN 

WORCESTER (145,986) 

An anti-spitting regulation was adopted December 12, 1900. Bj^ a- regulation of the 
Board of Health, tuberculosis was made reportable on December i, 1902. Premises are dis- 
infected at death and removal and literature is distributed to patients. Health Officer: — 
James C. Coffy. 

MICHIGAN 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1893. — The State Board of Health has required the notification of tuberculosis since 1893. 

18Q5. — Public Act 146 of the year 1S05 requires that public schools shall teach the principal 
modes by which contagious diseases may be prevented and authorized the Board of 
Health to assist in this work by issuing bulletins to teachers. Tuberculosis is 
given special attention in these bulletins. 

1905. — ^An act was passed establishing a State tuberculosis sanatorium. The sum of 
$30,000 was appropriated for the purpose of "purchasing site, of erecting, construct- 
ing and equipping" the sanatorium and buildings, and to pay the necessary current 
* expenses for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1906 and 1907. This amount being 

found to be inadequate for construction purpose, an additional appropriation of 
$62,000 was made by the Legislature of 1907 for the purpose of completing the 
necessary buildings and equipment, and $8oco a year for maintenance of the sana- 
torium for the fiscal years ending June 30, 1908 and 1909. 

1909. — A comprehensive registration law was passed, amending the act of 1893. 

1909. — The act of 1895 was amended compelling physiologies used in Michigan public 
schools to contain one-eighth of all material on contagious diseases. 

1909. — Act 172, Public Acts of 1909, Section 25, provides that only tuberculin-tested cattle 
which show they are free from tuberculosis shall be imported into Michigan for 
dairy or breeding purposes. 

1909. — Act 210, P. A. 1909, Section i, provides that no person shall expectorate upon the 
floor, platform or the interior furnishings, except cuspidors, of a steam railroad, pas- 
senger car or street railway car, or upon floor, etc., of any passenger station. 
Public notices must be posted and cuspidors furnished. 
The State Board of Health carries on a campaign against the disease by circulars, 
literature, discussions, etc. Secretary State Board of Health : — Dr. Frank W. Shumway, 
Lansing. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

DETROIT (465,766) 

There is an anti-spitting regulation passed on January 9, 1906. Notification of living 
cases of tuberculosis was made compulsory by a state law of 1909. Premises are disin- 
fected at death and on removal, when notified. The Board of Health conducts a dispen- 
sary for tuberculosis, and a sanatorium for 75 patients. Lectuixs are given to nurses and 
doctors and other educational work, such as distribution of circulars, is carried on. Health 
Officer:— Dr. Guy L. Kiefer. 

GRAND RAPIDS (112,571) 

The anti-spitting ordinance is well enforced. A regulation requiring the reporting of 
tuberculosis has been adopted. Premises are disinfected at death and removal, and litera- 
ture is distributed to patients and physicians. The Board of Health conducts a sanatorium. 
Two visiting nurses are also employed to look after tuberculous patients in their homes. 
Health Officer:— Dr. William De Lano. 

KALAMAZOO (39,437) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was adopted in 1904. The state registration law is enforced 
74 cases and 48 deaths being reported in 1909. The city operates a tuberculosis colony in co- 
operation with the anti-tuberculosis society. The Board of Health gives lectures and distrib- 
utes tuberculosis literature. Health Officer: — Dr. A. H. Rockwell. 

234 



LEGISLATION MINNESOTA, MISSISSIPPI 

MINNESOTA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1901. — An act was passed providing that the governor appoint a commission of three to 

investigate the advisability of establishing a State sanatorium for consumptives. 

1903. — An act was passed establishing the Minnesota Sanatorium for Consumptives, and 

arranging for the control and administration of the same, and providing that only 

patients with incipient tuberculosis be received; $25,000 was appropriated. 

1907. — The Sanatorium Act was amended so that the applicants for admission might be 

examined by an examining physician, as the act originally provided. 
1907. — A section was added to the General Health Law making it mandatory upon local 
Boards of Health to employ the necessary assistance to enforce laws in regard to 
communicable diseases. 
1909. — An act providing for the erection of county tuberculosis hospitals was passed. 
Under a ruhng of the Board of Health notification of tuberculosis is required. The 
State Board of Health is conducting an educational campaign along broad lines. Secretary 
State Board of Health:— Dr. H. M. Bracken, St. Paul. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

DULUTH (78,466) 

An ordinance of 1905 prohibits spitting, but it is not enforced. An ordinance of 1905 
includes tuberculosis in the list of contagious diseases to be reported. A county Sanatorium 
for tuberculosis is being erected. The County Sanatorium Commission conducts a tubercu- 
losis dispensary. A special tuberculosis pavilion was erected at county farm in 1910. 
Health Officer:— Dr. H. C. Webster. Secretary and Superintendent of County Sana- 
torium Commission : — Dr. WilHam M. Hart. 

MINNEAPOLIS (301,408) 

By ordinances passed in 1897, 1898, and 1904, spitting in all public places is prohibited. 
About four hundred arrests were made in 1909. A special ordinance of January 12, 1904, 
made tuberculosis reportable. In 1909 there were 356 deaths and 434 living cases reported. 
Premises are disinfected and literature is distributed to doctors and patients. Two visiting 
nurses are employed by the Health Department, their salaries paid by Mrs. George H. Chris- 
tian. The city has a tuberculosis hospital, operates a tuberculosis dispensary and employs 
two tuberculosis nurses. Commissioner of Health: — Dr. P. M. Hall. 

ST. PAUL (214,744) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was adopted in 1899 and amended in 1900 and 1901. It is 
well enforced. An ordinance of 1904 requires the reporting of tuberculosis cases, 373 cases 
and 219 deaths being reported in 1909. The Board of Health distributes literature on tu- 
berculosis. Commissioner of Health: — Dr. Gustav A. Renz. 



MISSISSIPPI 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1910. — A registration law requiring the reporting of all tuberculosis cases was passed. 
. 1910. — An appropriation of $8,000 was granted to the State Board of Health for educational 
work. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. S. H. McLean, Jackson. 



23s 



LEGISLATION MISSOURI 



MISSOURI 

STATE LEGISLATION 

1905. — An act was passed establishing a State Sanatorium for the treatment of incipient 
pulmonary tuberculosis. A commission was appointed to select a site, erect build- 
ings, etc., and $50,000 was pro\ided. The sanatorium was erected at Mount 
Vernon. 

1907. — An act was passed providing that a person affected with consumption of the lungs, 
or with scrofula, or like communicable disease, is not to work in a bakery. 

1907. — In 1907 an act was passed providing for the government and administration of the 
Missouri State Sanatorium for Incipient Pulmonary Tuberculosis bj' a board of 
five managers, appointed by the governor and senate for thirty years. 

1909. — A vital statistics act, providing for the registration of all births and deaths has 
helped to give statistics for the tuberculosis campaign. 

1909. — ^An act excluding children afflicted with any infectious diseases from the public 
schools was passed. 

1909. — A section was inserted in the revised statutes of 1909 requiring that "special in- 
struction as to tuberculosis, its nature, causes and prevention" be given in all 
public schools of the state. 

1910. — A State Tuberculosis Commission was appointed by the Governor, but supported 
by private funds. The Commission's exhaustive report was the basis for legisla- 
tion in 1911. 

1911. — An act was passed providing for the establishment of hospital districts and providing 
for the erection of tuberculosis hospitals in such districts. 
Secretary State Board of Health:— Dr. Frank S. Hiller, Jefferson City. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

KANSAS CITY (248,381) 

A comprehensive anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1906. A special registration 
ordinance was passed in 1908, and in 1909 there were 360 deaths and 77 living cases reported. 
The city supports a pavilion at the city hospital and will build a $75,000 hospital at Leeds in 
191 1. A nurse is supported by the cit}' and a tuberculosis dispensary also. Health Com- 
missioner: — Dr. Walter S. Wheeler. 

ST. JOSEPH (77,403) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1907. Tuberculosis has been reportable since 
1907. Premises are disinfected at death and removal and hterature is distributed to pa- 
tients and the public. A special ward for tuberculous patients is set aside at the city hospital. 
Assistant City Physician: — Dr. J. T. Stamey. 

ST. LOUIS (687,029) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was adopted on February 18, 1903. It is rigidly enforced on 
street-cars and in public buildings by the sanitary officers of the Health Department. Since 
April 28, 1905, a complete notification ordinance has been in force. Premises are disinfected 
at death and removal. Literature is distributed to physicians. A special tuberculosis com- 
mission served the city for over two years from 1908, and did much good in arousing public 
opinion and securing hospital and other provision for cases of tuberculosis. The commission 
was discontinued on February i, 1911. In 1910 the hospital department of the city pro- 
vided for 120 cases of tuberculosis in a hospital at Quarantine, Mo. The city also conducts 
a special dispensary. Health Commissioner: — Dr. H. Wheeler Bond. 



236 



LEGISLATION MONTANA, NEBRASKA, NEVADA 

MONTANA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1911. — A bill for a state sanatorium was passed, appropriating $20,000 for construction 
and $10,000 for maintenance. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. Thomas D. Tuttle, Helena. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

BUTTE (39,16s) 

An ordinance which went into effect January 12, 1908, created a Board of Health and 
revised the sanitary regulations of the city. Under this ordinance spitting in pubhc places 
is prohibited and tuberculosis is declared one of the infectious diseases to be reported to the 
Board of Health. The Board disinfects in case of death and removal, and also distributes 
circulars furnished by the State Board of Health. Health Officer: — Dr. J. B. Sullivan. 



NEBRASKA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1907. — A bill for a State sanatorium for consumptives was introduced in 1907, but was 

defeated. 
1909. — A law was passed providing that county authorities mignt treat indigent patients 
in institutions approved by the State Board of Health, but that such institutions 
must use the "modern method of vaccine therapy." 
The State Board of Health in its quarantine regulations has a rule authorizing the iso- 
lation of tuberculous cases to a certain extent, and requires the reporting of this disease. 
Secretary State Board of Health : — Dr. E. Arthur Carr, Lincoln. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

LINCOLN (43,973) 

An ordinance of January 14, 1905, makes it unlawful to spit in public places. Tuber- 
culosis is oj6&cially recognized as a communicable disease and must be reported. Premises 
are disinfected if parties interested request it. Health Officer: — Dr. William C. Rohde. 

OMAHA (124,096) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1898. Tuberculosis is included in the list of 
diseases to be reported to the Board of Health. Premises are not disinfected, except upon 
request. Some hterature is distributed. The county opened a specially constructed ward 
in the County Hospital for tuberculosis in 1908. Health Officer: — Dr. Ralph W. Connell, 
City Hall. 



NEVADA 
STATE LEGISLATION 

There is no State legislation affecting tuberculosis. Secretary State Board of Health : 
— Dr. S. L. Lee, Carson City.. 

237 



LEGISLATION NEW HAMPSHIRE, NEW JERSEY 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1901. — The Legislature passed an act providing that the governor appoint a commission 
to report on the estabUshment of a State sanatorium for consumptives. 

1903. — An act was passed giving the State Board of Charities power to send indigent con- 
sumptive patients to a sanatorium for treatment, paying the actual cost of main- 
tenance, support, etc., of the patient, and providing that they make quarterly 
reports on such procedure to the governor. 

1903. — Spitting in public places is prohibited by an act of 1903. 

1905. — An act was passed providing that the deaths and removals of consumptives be 
reported by the parties interested, and that infected premises be cleansed and that 
the premises are not to be occupied until so cleansed; a penalty of $50 was provided 
for violation of this act. 

1905. — An act was also passed for the establishment of a State sanatorium for consump- 
tives, and an appropriation of $50,000 therefor. This act was to be void if suitable 
provisions were otherwise made, prior to May, 1907. A site was chosen in 1908 at 
Glencliffe and the sanatorium was opened in 1909. 

1909. — $25,000 was appropriated for the maintenance of the State Sanatorium. 

1909. — A law was passed to encourage the establishment of local dispensaries for tubercu- 
losis and appropriating $500. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. Irving A. Watson, Concord. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

MANCHESTER (70,063) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1904. A notification ordinance was passed 
in 1906. Premises are disinfected only on request. Clerk Board of Health: — William K. 
Robbins. 



NEW JERSEY 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1902. — An act was passed establishing a State Sanatorium for tuberculous diseases and 
providing for a managing board to select site, erect building, etc.; $50,000 was 
appropriated for this work. 

1903. — This act was amended by restricting the admission of free patients to the State 
sanatorium to those affected with incipient tuberculosis of a curable nature. 

1903. — The same act was further amended by giving the board of managers power to in- 
stitute condemnation proceedings for a site. 

1903. — An anti-spitting law, making it a misdemeanor to spit in railroad cars, was passed 
in 1903. 

1904. — $200,000 additional appropriation was made for the State Sanatorium for tuber- 
culous diseases. 

1907. — ^The sanatorium act was amended so that the board of managers were given the 
power to determine the rate of pay, and authorizing municipalities to pay for their 
indigent patients sent at the request of the Overseers of the Poor. Other indigents 
were to be cared for at the expense of the State. 

1907. — An act was passed providing that the consent of a municipality is necessary for the 
estabUshment of a tuberculosis hospital within its limits, corporations not organized 
for profit and municipal corporations excepted. 

238 



LEGISLATION NEW JERSEY 

1907. — An act was passed giving permission to cities of the first class to erect and maintain 
hospitals on unused land for the treatment of tuberculosis, the Board of Health of 
such cities to have control of such institutions. 

1909.— A registration law was passed requiring the reporting of tuberculosis cases. 

1909. — A comprehensive anti-spitting law was passed. 

1909. — $1,500 was appropriated to a special commission appointed to hold a public 
meeting and to present a plan for the state control of tuberculosis. 

1910. — A law was passed giving the State Board of Health sole authority to decide on the 
location of any new tuberculosis sanatorium or camp to be established. 

1910. — By a special law, the legislature voted and the governor approved an appropriation 
of $10,000 to the State Board of Health for the purpose of conducting an educational 
campaign against tuberculosis. The State Appropriation Committee refused, 
however, to give the money, thus nullifying the action for the time being. 

1910. — A law was passed providing for the erection and maintenance of county tuberculosis 
hospitals by Boards of Freeholders. 

1910. — The incomplete registration law of 1909 was repealed and a more comprehensive 
law substituted, being Chapter 169, Laws of 1910. 
The State Board of Health requires notification, and furnishes facilities for the examin- 
ation of sputum. The Board also distributes pamphlets on the prevention of tuberculosis. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. Bruce S. Keator, Trenton. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

CAMDEN (94,538) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1897. There is no local notification ordinance. 
Health Officer:— Dr. John F. Leavitt. 

EAST ORANGE (34,371) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed December 30, 1909. Tuberculosis was included 
in a list of communicable diseases to be reported on December 30, 1909, and in 1910 there 
were 43 living cases and 23 deaths registered. Health Officer: — Dr. William T. Bowman, 
25 S. Walnut Street. 

ELIZABETH (73,409) • 

Spitting in public conveyances and public buildings is prohibited by the Sanitary Code, 
promulgated in March, 1899. Pulmonary tuberculosis is declared a communicable and in- 
fectious disease by the Sanitary Code of March, 1899. Premises are disinfected at death and 
removal. Union County is erecting a $75,000 sanatorium. Health Officer: — Louis J. 
Richards. 

HOBOKEN (70,324) 

An ordinance prohibiting spitting in public buildings and conveyances was passed on 
June 13, 1899. While tuberculosis is officially recognized as a communicable disease, there is 
no city ordinance compelling its notification or registration. Health Inspector: — Antonio 
GranelH. 

NEWARK (347,469) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed on February 7, 1899, and amended in 1909. The 
reporting of tubercidosis was made compulsory in 1909. Premises are disinfected at death or 
removal. Circulars are distributed to patients, physicians, and others. The city conducts 
a sanatoriimi at Verona, has a special tuberculosis clinic at the Municipal Dispensary, and 
also a pavilion for advanced cases in connection with City Hospital. Essex County is building 
a hospital for advanced cases at Belleville. Health Officer: — Dr. David D. Chandler. 

ORANGE (29,630) 

A local regulation prohibiting spitting was passed in 1900 and a city ordinance in 1909. 
The state registration law is enforced, 127 cases and 62 deaths being reported in 1909. By 
an ordinance of 1908, the Board fumigates after every case of tuberculosis. Considerable 
literature is also distributed. Health Officer: — J. Scott MacNutt. 

239 



LEGISLATION NEW MEXICO, NEW YORK 

PASSAIC (54,773) 

An anti-spitting regulation has been embodied in the Sanitary Code since 1904. Tu- 
berculosis was declared an infectious disease and made reportable in 1904. Premises are 
disinfected at death and removal. The Board of Health operates a tuberculosis pavilion 
at the Citj' Hospital, and employs a visiting nurse. Health Officer : — Dr. Nelson Elliott. 

PATERSON (125,600) _ _ 

A comprehensive anti-spitting law was passed December 14, 1897. A section declaring 
tuberculosis an infectious disease, and requiring notification, was adopted into the Sanitary 
Code on January 24, 1005. 248 living cases and 197 deaths were reported in 1909. Circulars 
are distributed to both physicians and patients. Premises are disinfected on death or re- 
moval. The Board of Health operates a pavilion at the isolation hospital for the use of 
tuberculosis cases. Health Officer: — Dr. J. Alexander Browne. 

PERTH AMBOY (32,121) 

There is no anti-spitting ordinance. The state registration law is enforced, 29 cases and 
36 deaths being reported in 1909. The Board of Health distributes literature to patients. 
Health Officer:— Dr. John L. Lund. 

TRENTON (96,815) 

A regulation of the Board of Health of 1900 prohibits spitting. A regulation of the 
Board of Health of 1901 classes tuberculosis as an infectious disease. In 1909 there were 
181 deaths and 288 cases reported. The board distributes literature to patients at request 
of physician. Health Officer: — Dr. A. S. Fell. 

WEST HOBOKEN (35403) 

There is no local anti-spitting ordinance and the state law is not enforced. There is no 
local registration ordinance, but the Hudson County Board of Health, with offices in Jersey 
City, compels the reporting of tuberculosis cases under the state law. Sanitary Inspector: 
— Frank A. Frederick. 



NEW MEXICO 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1901. — An act was passed providing that persons afflicted with tuberculosis were not to be 

employed as teachers in public schools, and providing for a certificate of good health, 

and fixing a penalty for the violation of this act. 
1903. — This law was amended so that teachers so discharged might have appeal to the Board 

of Health or Educational Institute. 
1903. — An act was passed entitled "An Act to Encourage the Establishment of Sanatoria 

in the Territory of New Mexico." This act provided that if a sanatorium spent 

$100,000 for an institution within two years, it should be exempt from all taxation 

for six years thereafter. 
1907. — An act was passed prohibiting spitting in public places, and having reference chiefly 

to consumptives. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. J. A. Massie, Santa Fe. 



NEW YORK 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1899. — An act was passed providing that cities with a population of 250,000 or over may 
maintain outside their limits, with the approval of the State Board of Health, 
hospitals for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. 

240 



LEGISLATION NEW YORK 

1900. — $50,000 was appropriated to establish a tuberculosis hospital in the Adiron- 

dacks. 
1901. — $100,000 was appropriated for the building and equipment of the State Tubercu- 
losis Hospital, the State architect to submit plans and supervise directions, and 
the site to be selected by the governor, President of the Senate, and Speaker of the 
Assembly. 
1902. — An act of 1900 was amended so that patients in the State Tuberculosis Hospital, 
if unable to pay for transportation and treatment, were to be maintained at the 
expense of the municipality where legally residing. 
1903. — An act was passed providing that a hospital for consumptives may not be estab- 
lished in towns without the consent of the Board of Supervisors and the Town Board. 
1906. — This act was further amended, authorizing that a list of patients be furnished by the 
hospital management to the localities from which the patients come, with the bill 
of charges, not exceeding $5.00 per week for each patient. 
1907. — By a regulation of the State Department of Health, tuberculosis was added to the 

list of communicable diseases and was made reportable. 
1908. — A general tuberculosis act was passed, providing for the registration of the disease, 

and protecting the public against its spread. 
1908. — A complementary act was also passed reorganizing the Health Department and 
giving it more power, and also placing tuberculosis in the list of infectious diseases. 
1909. — A county hospital law, giving power to supervisors to erect and maintain county 

hospitals, was passed. 
1909. — The law of 1903 with reference to location of tuberculosis hospitals was amended, 
giving the State Commissioner of Health and the local health of&cer power to 
determine sites, and providing for a final board of appeal, consisting of State Com- 
missioner of Health, Speaker of the Assembly, and the Lieutenant Governor. 
1909.— The health laws of the state were consolidated into one chapter. 
1909. — Acts enabling Buffalo and Elmira to maintain tuberculosis sanatoria were passed. 
1909. — An appropriation of $307,000 was made for doubling the capacity of the State 

Sanatorium. 
1909.— Permission was given to Rennsalaer County to treat in its county hospital other 

than indigent cases. 
1909. — -An appropriation of $10,000 was granted to the Commissioner of Agriculture to 
conduct experiments in bovine tuberculosis. 
The State Department of Health carries on an acti-\'e campaign against tuberculosis. 
Dturing the year 1906, the Department planned and conducted at the annual Conference of 
Health Officers, the first tuberculosis exhibition held outside of the city of New York in any 
part of the state. In 1907, the Department undertook the preparation and construction of 
a large traveling tuberculosis exhibition, and has shown it in every city of the state in co- 
operation with the State Charities Aid Association. The Department co-operates also with 
local medical organizations in holding meetings devoted to the presentation of the medical 
aspects of tuberculosis work; and has in course of preparation a medical tuberculosis exhibi- 
tion. Commissioner State Department of Health: — Dr. Eugene H. Porter, Albam\ 
Director of Tuberculosis Exhibit: — Dr. E. G. Whipple. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

ALBANY (100,253) 

Spitting in public places is prohibited by a regulation of the Board of Health of 1900 and 
by a city ordinance of 1908. Tuberculosis has been reportable since February 4, 1907. 
Premises are disinfected, and circulars, sputum cups, etc., are distributed by the Bureau of 
Health. Health Officer: — Dr. Joseph D. Craig. 

AMSTERDAIVI (31,267) 

There is a local anti-spitting ordinance. The state law is enforced with reference to regis- 
tration, 46 cases and 26 deaths being reported in 1909. The Board of Health maintains a 
dispensary with a visiting nurse. The Board also distributes literature in several languages 
and disinfects after tuberculosis cases. The Supervisors of Montgomery county have author- 
ized the erection of a county hospital. Health Officer :--Dr. James S. Walton. 
16 241 



LEGISLATION ■ NEW YORK 

AUBURN (34,668) 

The anti-spitting ordinance was adopted in 1005 by the Board of Health. Tuberculosis 
was included with other infectious diseases in 1005, and was then made reportable. Prem- 
ises are disinfected, and literature supplied bv the State Department of Health is distributed. 
Health Officer:— Dr. Thomas C. Sawyer. 

BINGHAMTON (48,443) 

An anti-spiltinp; ordinance was passed February i, 1907. There is no local ordinance 
requiring the registration of tuberculosis, but the state law is enforced. Premises are fumi- 
gated at death and removal. The Board of Health employs one visiting nurse. The city 
in 190S reopened a private institution for tuberculosis, called the Mountain Sanatorium. 
The Supervisors of Broome County in December, iqii, authorized the erection of a county 
tuberculosis hospital. Health Officer: — Dr. Dan S. Burr. 

BUFFALO (423,715) 

A comprehensive anti-spitting ordinance was passed Februarj'- 13, 1902. Notification of 
tuberculosis has been required since 1900. Premises are disinfected, and pamphlets are 
distributed to physicians and patients. Erie County, within which Bullalo is located, main- 
tains a tuberculosis hospital at the County Poor Farm, and has set aside $200,000 for a 
tuberculosis building at the new county hospital to be begun in 191 1. The City of Buffalo 
has appropriated $200,000 and is erecting a municipal tuberculosis sanatorium for incipient 
cases at Perrysburg. Health Commissioner: — Dr. F. E. Fronczak. 

ELMIRA (37,176) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed April 28, 1903. Tuberculosis was declared a 
communicable disease in 1904, and was then made reportable. All premises are disinfected, 
when death has been reported from tuberculosis. Two circulars on consumption are dis- 
tributed. The city established a sanatorium in 1909. Health Officer: — Dr. F. B. Parker. 

MT. VERNON (30,919) 

A regulation of the Board of Health of 1910 prohibits spitting. Under the state 
registration law, 16 cases and 34 deaths were reported in 1910. Health Officer: — Dr. 
John R. Hughes. 

NEW YORK (Greater New York) (4,766,883) 

The revised Sanitary Code of 1898 contains a complete prohibition of promiscuous spit- 
ting in public. The law is enforced by periodic raids. After a period of preliminary study and 
observation lasting seven years, the Board of Health passed a series of resolutions on February 
13, 1894, designed to assist in the accomplishment of its aims for the suppression of this 
disease. One of these resolutions involved the reporting of tuberculosis. At the close of 
the \'ear 1910, the Department was receiving annually reports of nearly 30,000 new cases. 
(In the present Sanitary Code, Sections 133 and 138, all forms of tuberculosis are considered to 
be infectious and communicable.) The activities of the Health Department and other de- 
partments engaged in tuberculosis work in Greater New York may be summarized along the 
following lines: (i) All cases of pulmonary tuberculosis occurring in the city of New York 
are registered at the Department of Health. (2) Every person suffering from pulmonary 
tuberculosis is furnished with instnactions as to the measures to be taken to prevent its ex- 
tension. When there is no private physician in attendance, these instructions are given by 
nurses of the Department of Health, who visit the patients at regular intervals. (3) All 
premises which ha\'e been occupied by persons suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis are, 
when vacated by death or removal, disinfected either by fumigation, by formaldehyde or by 
renovation. (4) Charitable assistance is provided so far as is possible for all cases requiring 
such assistance. Hospital care in the most suitable institution for the individual case is 
provided through a Hospital Admission Bureau conducted by the Departments of Charities, 
Health, and Bellevue and Allied Hospitals. The Department of Health maintains a hospital 
for advanced cases on North Brother Island, a sanatorium for incipient cases at Otisville 
and two ferry boat day camps. Bellevue and Allied Hospitals also maintain two ferry boat 
camps. The Department of Charities conducts a large hospital on Blackwells Island and 
will complete in 1912 a hospital of 1000 beds on Staten Island. (5) Patients not under a 

242 



LEGISLATION NEW YORK 

physician's care are furnished treatment and advice at the ten tuberculosis clinics of the De- 
partment of Health and the other municipal hospital clinics which are conducted in all the 
boroughs, and at the ferry boat day camps. (6) The general public is educated by the De- 
partment of Health as to the nature of the disease; the precautions to be taken against its 
spread; the advisability of institution and sanatorium treatment; by the distribution of 
large quantities of literature printed in all languages; and the holding of stereopticon exhibi- 
tions in the public parks and on the recreation piers. (7) Specimens of sputum from residents 
ot New York City are examined for the presence of tubercle bacilli at the Health Department 
Laboratories. (8) Special medical inspectors investigate and examine all suspected cases, 
complaints, children to be excluded from school, etc. School children suffering from active 
pulmonary tuberculosis are not allowed to attend school. Commissioner of Health: — 
Ernest J. Lederle, Ph.D. General Medical Officer: — Dr. Hermann M. Biggs. Chief of 
Division of Communicable Diseases: — Dr. John S. BiUings, Jr. Commissioner cf 
Charities: — Michael J. Drummond. President Board of Trustees Bellevue and 
Allied Hospitals : — Dr. John W. Brannan. 

ROCHESTER (218,140) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1900. Tuberculosis was declared an infectious 
disease and made reportable in 1900. Premises are disinfected by the Board of Health. 
Circulars are distributed to patients and the public. One visiting nurse is employed by the 
Bureau. The city maintains a municipal sanatorium, and Monroe County is erecting a 
$75,000 sanatorium near Rochester. Health Officer: — Dr. G. W. Goler. 

SCHENECTADY (72,826) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1906. A new Sanitary code adopted in iqo8 
makes tuberculosis a communicable disease to be reported to the Board of Health. Premises 
are disinfected at death or removal. A municipal tuberculosis dispensary was opened in 1908. 
A county hospital was authorized in 1910, and a temporary camp was started as a nucleus of 
the institution. Health Officer : — Dr. Charles F. Clowe. 

SYRACUSE (1.37,249) 

A comprehensive anti-spitting law was passed on February 4, 1908. Tuberculosis was 
declared to be an infectious disease on February 4, 1908, and has since been reportable. A 
considerable amount of literature is distributed to physicians and the pubHc. Premises are 
disinfected at death and removal. The Board of Health opened a free tuberculosis dispen- 
sary in 1908. A county hospital will be erected in 1911. By co-operation with private or- 
ganizations the Health Department carries on an educational campaign. Health Officer : 
— Dr. David M. Totman. 

TROY (76,813) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed February 9, 1904. There is no local ordinance 
requiring registration of tuberculosis. Premises are disinfected. The distribution of circu- 
lars was begun in 1908. The city of Troy and county of Rensselaer in 1909 opened a hospital 
for tuberculosis at a cost of $25,000. Health Officer: — Dr. C. E. Nichols. 

UTICA (74,419) 

There is a local anti-spitting ordinance. There is no local notification ordinance. 
Premises are disinfected, and Hteratiu-e furnished by the State is distributed. Health 
Officer :— Dr. W. D. Peckham. 

YONKERS (79,803) 
_ An anti-spitting ordinance, passed on April 9, 1897, was made more comprehensive by an 
ordinance of April 16, 1907. By a special ordinance tuberculosis was declared an infectious 
disease and made reportable on December 13, 1893. In 1909 there were 113 deaths and 247 
living cases reported. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. The city is preparing 
to erect a municipal hospital. Health Officer:— Dr. W. S. Coons. 



243 



LEGISLATION NORTH CAROLINA, NORTH DAKOTA, OHIO 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1907. — An act was passed providing for separation in State prisons of prisoners afflicted 
with tuberculosis. 

1907. — An act was passed establishing the North Carolina State Sanatorium for the Treat- 
ment of Tuberculosis, twch'e directors to be elected by the General Assembly for 
eight }'cars, and pro\iding for $15,000 appropriation, and an annual appropriation 
of §5,000. A site was chosen at IMontrosc, and the institution was oi)encd in 1908. 

1909. — An appropriation of §37,500 was made for the enlargement and maintenance of the 
State sanatorium. The State Text-Book Commission has inserted a chapter on 
consumption in all of the text-books on physiology. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. Watson S. Rankin, Raleigh. 



NORTH DAKOTA 

STATE LEGISLATION 

1906. — A set of regulations "for the prevention and mitigation of infectious and contagious 
diseases" was adopted by the State Board of Health, having the force of law. 
These regulations provide that tuberculosis be reported; that premises and clothing 
be disinfected at death and removal of tuberculous patients; that school boards be 
forbidden to employ teachers having tuberculosis; and that tuberculous children 
be excluded from the schools. 
1909. — $10,000 was appropriated for a site for a State Sanatorium, and for improvement 

thereof. The site chosen is at Dunseith. 
1911. — $37,500 was appropriated for the erection of the State Sanatorium. 
The Board of Health also carries on an active campaign through newspapers and by 
distributing circulars, and in co-operation with the State Anti-Tuberculosis Association. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. J. Grassick, Grand Forks. 



OHIO 

STATE LEGISLATION 

1902. — An act was passed creating a State Tuberculosis Commission, consisting of seven 
members, appointed by the governor, to investigate the feasibility of establishing 
sanatoria in the State, and to report to the governor by May, 1903. An appro- 
priation of $500 was provided. 

1904. — An act was passed providing for the creation of a commission, consisting of hve 
members, to purchase lands and erect a State sanatorium for tuberculosis, and to 
make provision for the appointment of a managing board, etc. Thirty-five thou- 
sand dollars was appropriated for this work. The institution is located at Mount 
Vernon. 

1908. — An act was passed which provided that "It shall be unlawful to keep any person 
suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis in any county infirmary, except in separate 
buildings to be provided and used for that purpose only." The act provides for 
the erection by counties of suitable sanatoria, or for the boarding of tuberculous 
patients from one county in sanatoria in another. 

1908. — The Legislature passed a bill providing for the government of, and regulating the 
admission of, patients to the State sanatorium, and arranging for pay patients. 

244 



LEGISLATION OHIO 

1909. — The county hospital law of 1908 was amended so that it became mandatory ujjon 
county commissioners to provide separate hospitals for tuberculous cases before 
January i, 191 1. A further amendment provided that any two or more counties, 
not to exceed five, might combine and erect a district hospital to be maintained 
jointly by the several counties. 
1910. — An act was passed giving permission to boards of education in any city schools to 
establish open air schools for tuberculous children and to exclude such children 
from the regular pubhc schools. 
The State Board of Health is active in anti-tuberculosis work, and carries on a constant 
campaign through the press and by other means. The State does not require compulsory 
notification of tuberculosis. Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. C. O. Probst, 
Columbus. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

AKRON (69,097) 

There is an ordinance prohibiting spitting in public places. There is no notification or 
registration ordinance. Premises are sometimes disinfected at death or removal. A Dis- 
trict Tuberculosis Hospital for five counties will be erected near Akron in 191 1. Health 
Officer:— Dr. A. A. Kohler. 

CANTON (50,217) 

An ordinance was passed in 1907, prohibiting spitting in public places. An ordinance 
compelling the reporting of tuberculosis was passed in 1907. Premises are disinfected at 
death and removal. The Board of Health employs a visiting physician for all classes of sick 
poor. Health Officer: — Dr. Frank Dahinden. 

CINCINNATI (364,463) 

There is an anti-spitting ordinance. By a regulation of the Board of Health, tubercu- 
losis has been reportable since 1898. Premises are disinfected at death and removal, and 
pamphlets are distributed to phj'sicians and patients. The city maintains a branch hos- 
pital for tuberculosis, accommodating 300 patients. The Board of Health employs two visit- 
ing nurses. Health Officer: — Dr. John H. Landis. 

CLEVELAND (560,663) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was adopted in the Health Regulations of 1905. Tuberculosis 
has been reportable since 1904. Premises have been disinfected at death and removal since 
1 901. The city of Cleveland has two sanatoria: one in the city, for advanced cases; and 
one ten miles outside of the city, for incipient cases. A new sanatorium costing $250,000 is 
being built. The Plealth Department conducts two special tuberculosis clinics. The sale 
of milk and the sweeping and cleaning of streets are also carefully regulated. In 19 10 a Tu- 
berculosis Division to have charge of all tuberculosis cases under the Health Department 
was established. By lectures and through the press the subject of tuberculosis is kept be- 
fore the people. Health Officer: — Dr. Clyde E. Ford. Chief of Division of Tuberculo- 
sis: — Dr. R. H. Bishop, Jr. 

COLUMBUS (181,548) 

A comprehensive anti-spitting ordinance was passed on January 16, 1906. Tuberculosis 
was made reportable by an ordinance of February, 1906. Premises are disinfected on death 
and removal. Franklin County erected a temporary sanatorium near Columbus on the 
Infirmary grounds in 1908, and enlarged it in 1910. Health Officer: — Dr. J. W. Clemmer. 

DAYTON (116,577) 

An ordinance prohibiting public spitting was passed November 23, 1900. Reporting of 
tuberculosis is required by a regulation of the Board of Health. Premises are disinfected 
when requested by parties interested. Montgomery and Preble counties estabhshed a Dis- 
trict Hospital near Dayton in 1909. Health Officer: — Dr. C. L. Patterson. 

245 



LEGISLATION OHIO, OKLAHOMA, OREGON 

HAMILTON (35,279) 

There is a local ordinance against spitting. There is no registration ordinance. The 
Board of Health fumigates after cases of tuberculosis and distributes literature. Health 
Officer:— Dr. Mark INIillikin. 

SPRINGFIELD (46,921) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was adopted December 14, 1906. The Health Code in 190S 
made tuberculosis reportable as a disease "dangerous to the public health." Premises have 
been disinfected at death and removal since April, 1907. Circulars are distributed to pa- 
tients and others. A District Tuberculosis Hospital for four counties was erected in 1910 
near Springfield. Health Officer: — Dr. Ira E. Seward. 

TOLEDO (168,497) 

The city has an anti-spitting ordinance. Tuberculosis is not officially recognized as a 
communicable disease, and there is no notification ordinance or regulation. Premises are 
disinfected at request of a doctor or family. Literature is distributed to families when 
cases are reported to the Board of Health. A County Hospital for Lucas County costing 
$40,000 will be erected in 191 1. Health Officer: — Dr. B. Becker. 

YOUNGSTOWN (79,066) _ _ 

An ordinance prohibiting spitting in public places was passed on January 6, 1902. An 
ordinance compelling the reporting of tuberculosis was passed on February 6, 1905. Premises 
are disinfected at death and removal, and literature is distributed to patients and physicians. 
Health Officer:— Dr. H. E. Welch. 



OKLAHOMA 

STATE LEGISLATION 

There is no legislation affecting tuberculosis. State Commissioner of Health: — Dr. 
J. C. Mahr, Oklahoma City. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

OKLAHOMA CITY (64,205) 

An ordinance prohibiting spitting was passed in 1908. There is no ordinance requiring 
registration. The Board of Health conducts a tuberculosis hospital. Health Officer: — Dr. 
J. W. Riley. 

OREGON 

STATE LEGISLATION 

1905. — Under the rules and regulations of the State Board of Health promulgated in 1905, 

tuberculosis is made one of the diseases to be reported to the Health Officer within 

twenty-four hours after date of discovery. 
1909. — An appropriation of $20,000 was made for the remodelling of buildings at Salem 

for a State Sanatorium, and $25,000 for maintenance. The sanatorium was opened 

in 1910. 
State Health Officer:- Dr. Calvin S. White, Portland. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

PORTLAND (207,214) 

Spitting in public places is forbidden by 'a local ordinance."- Reporting of tuberculosis is 
not required by ordinance. Premises are disinfected and literature furnished by the State 
Board of Health is distributed. Health Officer:— Dr. C. H. Wheeler. 

246 



LEGISLATION PENNSYLVANIA 

PENNSYLVANIA 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1903. — An act was passed authorizing the Commission of Forestry to erect and manage a 
State Sanatorium for Consumptives, same to be located in the State forestry reser- 
vation near Mt. Alto. Eight thousand dollars was appropriated for this purpose. 
1905. — A General Health Act of 1905 defines the duties of the State Department of Health, 
and gives them power to make rules and regulations governing the control of in- 
fectious diseases, tuberculosis being mentioned in this class. 
1907. — An act was passed authorizing the Department of Health, with the approval of the 
governor, to establish sanatoria for indigent persons afflicted with incipient tubercu- 
losis. These may be located in the forestry reservation. Six hundred thousand 
dollars was appropriated for this purpose. 
1907. — The same legislature authorized the transfer of the sanatorium at Mt. Alto, estab- 
lished in accordance with the above mentioned act of 1903, from the Commissioner 
of Forestry, to the Department of Health, same to be used for a sanatorium for 
the treatment of tuberculosis. 
1307. — The same legislature, 1907, in the General Appropriations Act, passed a provision 
granting $400,000 to the State Department of Health to "establish and maintain 
at such places in the State as may be deemed necessary, dispensaries for free treat- 
ment of indigent persons afflicted with tuberculosis." 
1907. — Several acts at different times have been passed appropriating money to private 
institutions for the treatment of tuberculosis. The earliest of these is one passed 
on June 2, 1903, making an appropriation to Rush Hospital for Consumption and 
Allied Diseases in Philadelphia. State appropriations have been made also to the 
Free Hospital for Consumptives at White Haven, and in 1907, $5000 Vk'as appro- 
priated for two years to the West Mountain Sanatorium at Scranton. 
1909. — Subsidies to private tuberculosis hospitals amomating to $94,500 were granted. 
1909. — An anti-spitting law was passed. 

1909. — The sum of $2,000,000 v/as granted to the State Department of Health for tubercu- 
losis work. 
1909. — A general Health Law was enacted for the control of communicable diseases and 
the prevention of infection therefrom. 
The Department of Health is now building a second State Sanatorium for Tuber- 
culosis on a tract of land at Cresson, Pa., given to the Commonwealth for that purpose by 
Andrew Carnegie. A site for a third sanatorium has been purchased at Hamburg, in the 
eastern end of the State. 

The Department of Plealth by January i, 1911, had established 115 dispensaries, one or 
more in each county of the State. From these as centers a large amount of educational work 
is done, in addition to the treatment afforded. Commissioner State Board of Health: 
— Dr. Samuel G. Dixon, Harrisburg. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

ALLENTOWN (51,913) 

An ordinance prohibiting spitting v.'as passed May 14, 1908. The state registration 
law is not enforced, and there is no local ordinance. Health Officer:— Dr. W. W. Eshbach. 

ALTOONA (52,127) 

By rule of the Board of Flealth, spitting was prohibited in 1904. Tuberculosis has been 
reportable since 1904, a rule of the Board of Health including it in the Hst of infectious 
diseases. Premises are disinfected at death and removal, and during progress of disease. 
The Board of Health does a considerable amount of educational work. Health Officer: 
—Dr. T. G. Herbert. 

ERIE (66,525) 

A comprehensive anti-spitting regulation was adopted on July s, 1901. Premises are dis- 

547 



LEGISLATION PENNSYLVANIA 

infected at death and removal. Secretary Board of Health: — Miss Clare E. Welsh. 
Health Officer:— Dr. J. W. Wright. 

HARRISBURG (64,186) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed on February 27, 1905. Since January i, 1908, 
the State law compelling notiiication of tuberculosis has been enforced. Premises are dis- 
infected at death and removal. Health Officer: — Dr. John C. Hutton. 

JOHNSTOWN (55,482) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1903. There is a local ordinance requiring the 
reporting of tuberculosis, passed in 1907. Health Officer: — Dr. George Hay, 444 Lincoln 
Street. 

McKEESPORT (42,694) 

A rule of the Board of Health of September 14, 1907, forbids spitting in public places. 
There is no local notification ordinance. Health Officer: — Dr. F. W. Hooper. 

PHILADELPHIA (1,549,008) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed on March 9, 1903. The State registration and 
notification law is enforced. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. Circulars are 
distributed to patients. The Department of Public Health and Charities provides 400 beds 
for tuberculous patients at the Philadelphia General Hospital and its annex at Byberry. Fifty 
district physicians and 25 district druggists supply medical attention and medicine to poor 
patients. The Department of Health also employs a corps of fifty medical inspectors for 
schools and tenement-houses. Director Department of Public Health and Charities: — 
Dr. Joseph S. Neff. 

PITTSBURG (533,905) 

There is a city ordinance against spitting, passed July 19, 1906. Notification of cases 
of pulmonary tuberculosis is obligatory by State law, the enforcement of which was begun in 
a systematic way in Pittsburg in 1907. Disinfection of premises after death or removal of 
tuberculous patients is done by the Bureau of Health. In 1909, a municipal commission on 
tuberculosis was appointed, and this commission has studied the tuberculosis situation in 
the city and has formulated plans for the control of the disease. The city maintains a hos- 
pital for consumptives at the City Home in Marshalsea and has voted to erect a $200,000 
sanatorium, work on which will be begun in 191 1. The Bureau of Health also co-operates 
with the local Anti-Tuberculosis League and State Dispensary. Superintendent Bureau 
of Health:— Dr. F. R. Walters. 

READING (96,071) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1900. A resolution of the Board of Health of 
September i, 1904, declared tuberculosis an infectious disease, and made it reportable. Prem- 
ises are disinfected at death and removal. Secretary Board of Health: — Dr. F. P. Heine. 

SCRANTON (127,000) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in January, 1907. The State registration law 
has been enforced since 1908. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. Superin- 
tendent Bureau of Health:— Dr. W. E. Keller. 

WILKES-BARRE (67,105) 

There is a regulation against public spitting, and it is well enforced. There is a local 
ordinance requiring the reporting of tuberculosis. Premises are disinfected only when re- 
quested by the family physician, or when the Health Officer deems it necessary. Health 
Officer:— Dr. F. M. Nichols. 

WILLIAMSPORT (31,860) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1905. Reporting of tuberculosis cases has been 
required by the Board of Health since 1905. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. 
Health Officer: — Dr. Charles W. Youngman, 601 Pine Street. 

248 



LEGISLATION PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, PORTO RICO, RHODE ISLAND 

YORK (44,750) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1907. Premises are disinfected at death and 
removal. Literature, printed by the local Board of Health, is distributed. Chairman 
Board of Health:— Dr. J. H. Bennett. 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1909. — An appropriation of $20,000 was made by the Legislature for a campaign against 
tuberculosis to be conducted by the Bureau of Health. 
The health work of the Islands is largely under the direction of the Bureau of Health 
of the United States Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service. This Bureau conducts 
a sanatorium, a night camp, a dispensary, and a hospital for advanced cases. Most of the 
work done thus far has been in Manila and neighboring towns. Director of Health: — 
Dr. Victor G. Heiser, Manila. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

MANILA (234,409) 

The Sanitary Code, which went into eilect January i, 1907, contains a section forbidding 
public spitting. This Code contains also a section which requires the reporting of tubercu- 
losis. The Sanitary Code requires that all dairy animals supplying milk to the city be tuber- 
cuhn-tested. The Bureau of Health distributes pamphlets on tuberculosis and does effective 
work in enforcing the Sanitary Code. Director of Health: — Dr. Victor G. Heiser. 



PORTO RICO 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1909. — The Director of Health, Charities and Correction was authorized by the Legisla- 
tive Assembly to treat indigent tuberculosis patients in the hospitals of the Anti- 
Tuberculosis League, $13,800 being appropriated for this purpose. The same act 
authorized the establishment of dispensaries under the Anemia Dispensary Service 
in seven of the largest cities of the Island, $9,000 being appropriated for this purpose. 
1909. — An act relating to the suppression of uncinariasis was amended so that the Com- 
missioner of Education was required to provide bulletins in the language of the 
people for instruction on tuberculosis in all of the graded schools of the Island. 
The Territorial Government works in close co-operation with the private anti-tubercu- 
losis agencies in the Island. Director of Health, Charities and Correction: — Juan F. 
Vias, San Juan. 



RHODE ISLAND 

STATE LEGISLATION 

1894. — Definite legislation in regard to tuberculosis in Rhode Island dates from 1S94, 
when an act was passed authorizing the State Board of Health to investigate the 
causes and prevention of tuberculosis, and appropriating $1000 for this purpose. 

1901. — One thousand dollars was appropriated for an investigation as to causes and pre- 
vention of tuberculosis. 

249 



LEGISLATION RHODE ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA 

1902. — An act was passed providing that the governor appoint five persons as a commission 
for a State sanatorium for consumptives, said commission to select site, to present 
specifications for a sanatorium, and to report to the Legislature within one year. 
Two thousand five hundred dollars was appropriated for the expenses of the com- 
mission. 

1903. — The commission was continued and authorized at the same time to erect and equip 
a sanatorium for consumptives, and to report annually until the work was done. 
Seventy-fi\'e thousand dollars was appropriated for this purpose. 

1904. — Twenty-four thousand dollars was added to complete the State Sanatorium for 
Consumptives. 

1905. — An act was passed creating a board of trustees for the State Sanatorium for Con- 
sumptives, and providing for its organization and management. 

1906. — A special appropriation was made to the Board of Health of $1,500 for the study 
and control of tuberculosis. 

1907. — An act was passed changing the name of the State Sanitarium to the Stale Sana- 
torium. 

1908. — A special appropriation was made to the Board of Health of $2,700 for the study 
and control of tuberculosis. 

1909. — A registration law requiring the reporting of all open cases of tuberculosis was 
passed. 

1910. — The Trustees of the State Sanatorium were authorized to serve as a State com- 
mission to investigate the need of hospitals for advanced cases. Action on this 
report will be taken in 1911. 
Secretary State Board of Health:— Dr. Gardner T. Swarts, Providence. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

PAWTUCKET (51,622) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1906. There is no ordinance or regulation re- 
quiring the reporting of tuberculosis and it is not officially recognized as a communicable 
disease. Superintendent of Health: — Dr. B. U. Richards. 

PROVIDENCE (224,326) 

There is an anti-spitting ordinance, adopted in 1899. Tuberculosis was declared an 
infectious disease and made reportable in 1903. Premises are disinfected only on request of 
parties interested. Some literature is circulated by the local Board of Health in addition to 
that furnished by the State Board of Health. The Board of Education, in 1907, established 
the first open air school in this country. A ward for advanced cases was opened in May, 
1910, at the city hospital. Superintendent of Health: — Dr. Charles V. Chapin. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1908. — The only legislation affecting tuberculosis in any way which South CaroUna has 
passed is a bill passed in 1908, which re-organizes the Health Department of the 
State and provides for a Commissioner of Health, and gives the Health Board a 
small fund for fighting tuberculosis. 
1909. — The State Board of Health in 1909 adopted a regulation making tuberculosis re- 
portable. 
The Board also assists in carrying on an educational campaign in the State. Sec- 
retary State Board of Health : — Dr. C. F. Williams, Columbia. 



250 



LEGISLATION SOUTH DAKOTA, TENNESSEE, TEXAS 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

STATE LEGISLATION 

1909. — An appropriation of $10,000 was granted for the establishment of a state sana- 
torium at Custer. The sanatorium was opened in 1910. 
Superintendent State Board of Health: — Dr. W. E. Moore, Tyndal. 

TENNESSEE 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1905. — An act was passed providing for the registration of communicable diseases, not 

specifying tuberculosis. 
1907. — An act was passed providing that proprietors of stores, factories, hotels, and thea- 
ters furnish cuspidors, and making it a misdemeanor to spit in public places. 
The State Board of Health has been active, distributing literature, etc., to prevent 
the spread of tuberculosis. State Commissioner of Health: — Dr. J. A. Albright, Nash- 
ville. 

CHATTANOOGA (44,604) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1904. An ordinance compelling the notifica- 
tion of tuberculosis was passed in 1905. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. 
City Physician: — Dr. P. D. Sims. 

KNOXVILLE (36,346) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1904. Pulmonary tuberculosis was listed as an 
infectious disease and made reportable in 1906. Premises are disinfected at death and re- 
moval. Circulars are distributed to tuberculous patients. Secretary Board of Health : — 
Dr. J. L. Cochrane. 

MEMPHIS (131,10s) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1905. Reporting of tuberculosis was made 
compulsory in 1908. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. Superintendent 
Health Department:— Dr. M. Goltman. 

NASHVILLE (110,364) 

An anli-spitting ordinance was passed on April 12, 1898. Notification of tuberculosis 
cases is required by the Board of Health. The city in 1909 appropriated $10,000 to build a 
municipal hospital. Health Officer:— Dr. W. E. Hibbett. 



TEXAS 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1904. — A law passed by]the^Legislature of 1904 compels the disinfection of raihoad passen- 
ger and sleeping-cars and public buildings. 

1905.— Under regulations of the Board of Health of 1905, common carriers are required to 
keep cuspidors in the cars. 

251 



LEGISLATION UTAH 

1907. — The State Board of Health, together with some of the municipal bodies, endeavored 

to enforce a regulation restraining railroads from bringing consumptives into the 

State, but this was unsuccessful and tlie regulation was rescinded. 
1909. — An appropriation of Sicooo was made to the State Board of Health for the purpose 

of returning to their homes indigent consumptives coming to Texas. 
1909. — $35,000 was appropriated for the erection of a tuberculosis pa\ilion at the State 

Hospital for Insane. 
1909. — A law appropriating $200,000 for a State Sanatorium was passed, but was vetoed 

by the Go\'ernor. 
1911. — A law was passed providing for the establishment of two tuberculosis sanatoria and 

appropriating $100,000 for construction and sites, and $40,000 for maintenance for 

two years. 
State Health Officer: — Dr. Ralph Steiner, Austin. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

GALVESTON (36,081) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1903. Notification of living cases of tubercu- 
losis is required by an ordinance of 1Q07. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. 
Health Officer:— Dr. C. W. Trueheart. 

HOUSTON (78,800) 

An anti-spilling ordinance was passed in 1904. Tuberculosis is officially recognized as a 
communicable disease and is reportable. Premises are disinfected at request of householders 
and by order of Health Department. City Health Officer: — Dr. George W. Larendon. 

SAN ANTONIO (96,614) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed on January 15, 1900. Tuberculosis was officially 
recognized as a communicable disease and made reportable in October, 1908. In 1909 an 
ordinance was passed prohibiting the erection of any new hospital of tuberculosis within the 
city hmits. President Board of Health: — Dr. H. D. Barnitz. 



UTAH 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1905. — The laws of 1905 amend the former section of 1S98 concerning dangerous and in- 
fectious diseases, now including tuberculosis in this class. 

190S. — In the same year a law was passed providing that attending physicians in public 
hospitals report cases of tuberculosis to the State Board of Health, fi.\ing a penalty 
for the failure to do so. 

1908. — Following a recommendation of the Governor, the various State educational insti- 
tutions devote some time each year to the study of the causes and means of pre- 
vention of tuberculosis. 
Secretary State Board of Health:— Dr. T. B. Beatty, Salt Lake City. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

SALT LAKE CITY (92,777) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1903. Tuberculosis is not included in the Hst 
of diseases to be reported to the Board of Health. Premises are sometimes disinfected at 
death and removal. Literature bearing especially on tuberculosis is distributed. Health 
Commissioner: — Dr. Samuel G. Paul. 



252 



LEGISLATION VERMONT, VIRGINIA 

VERMONT 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1902. — A commission of five was appointed by the governor to investigate the extent of 

tuberculosis, and the necessity of a sanatorium for the treatment of the same, to 

report in two years. 
1902. — The same year an act was passed providing that physicians be required to notify 

the State Board of Health of tuberculous patients. 
1902. — An act of igo2 prohibits spitting in railroad cars, street-cars, and railroad stations. 

In 1906 this act was extended to cover sidewalks and public buildings. 
1904. — An act was passed creating a tuberculosis commission to serve two years to educate 

the people as to the nature and cause of tuberculosis, and to report to the Legislature 

of 1906. Four thousand dollars was appropriated for this work. _ 
1906. — The governor was given the power to appoint a tuberculosis commission of three to 

continue the work of the commission created by the act of 1904. 
1910. — The sum of $2000 was appropriated to the State Board of Health for an exhibit and 

an educational campaign, and the Board was authorized to take over the work of 

the commission appointed in 1906. 
1911. — The Governor was authorized to appoint a commission of three to report to the 

next legislature relative to the establishment of a hospital for advanced cases of 

tuberculosis. 
Secretary State Board of Health:— Dr. Henry D. Holton, Brattleboro. 



VIRGINIA 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1901. — Chapter 333 of the Laws of 1901 makes it a misdemeanor to expectorate on church 

floors or aisles. 
1902. — This law was further amended in 1902, and imposed a penalty from $1.00 to ^lo.co 

for expectorating in electric cars. 
1906. — The law was again amended by an act prohibiting spitting in all pubUc places. 
1908. — A new health law was passed. This law gives the State Board of Health increased 

powers, and also provides for better co-ordination of the local boards. This law 

also provides for a special investigation on the part of the State Board of Health 

with regard to tuberculosis. 
1908. — Another act was passed, making it mandatory upon the sheriff, superintendent of 

the poor, or any other person in charge of the public institutions in a city, towa or 

county in the State, to isolate all cases of tuberculosis from the rest of the inmates 

of such institutions. 
1908. — The same act provided that apartments occupied by tuberculous patients must 

be disinfected before being occupied again. 
1910. — An appropriation of $40,000 was made for the enlargement of the State Sanatorium, 
which had been opened by the State Board of Health in 1909. 
The State Board of Health is engaged in an active campaign against tuberculosis. 
Commissioner of Health: — Dr. Ennion G. Williams, Richmond. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

NORFOLK (67,452) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1899. An ordinance requiring the reporting of 
tuberculosis was passed by the city council in 1908. Premises are disinfected at death and 
removal, and circulars are distributed to patients. The city in 190S appropriated Si,ooo to 
the Anti-Tuberculosis League of Norfolk toward the operation of a dispensary. Six hundred 

253 



LEGISLATION WASHINGTON, WEST \IRGINIA 

dollars was also appropriated for the erection of tents and a small building at the alms- 
house. Health Officer: — Dr. P. S. Schenck. 

RICHMOND (127,628) 

There is a local anti-spitting ordinance, besides the comprehensive State law on this 
subject. Physicians have been required to report tuberculosis since August, 1906. In 1909 
there were 33.). cases reported, with 292 deaths. Premises are disinfected at death and re- 
moval. Literature is distributed in large quantities to patients and physicians. The Board 
of Health conducts two special tuberculosis dispensaries, one for white and one for colored 
patients. The Board of Health also employs two visiting nurses. A large amount of educa- 
tional work is also done by lectures and in other ways. Chief Health Officer: — Dr. E. C. 
Levy. 

ROANOKE (34,874) 

There is an anti-spitting ordinance. There is a registration ordinance. The city has a 
tuberculosis hospital with 20 beds. Health Officer: — Dr. W. Brownley Foster. 



WASHINGTON 
STATE LEGISLATION 

1899. — An act was passed requiring physicians in cities of the first class and second class 
to report all tuberculous patients to local Boards of Health, the State Board to 
furnish the patients printed instructions to prevent the spread of the disease. 

1903. — An act was passed authorizing the State Board of Health to designate reportable 
diseases and requiring physicians to report all diseases so designated. Among 
others, the State Board has included pulmonary tuberculosis. 
Secretary State Board of Health:— Dr. Elmer E. Heg, Seattle. 

SEATTLE (237,194) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed May 13, 1907. Tuberculosis was placed in the list 
of infectious diseases and was made reportable on May 10, 1907. Premises are disinfected at 
death and removal and literature is distributed. The city voted a bond issue of $10,000 in 
19 10 for a sanatorium to be built in 191 1 by the Anti-tuberculosis League of King Count}'. 
A tuberculosis hospital ward is also maintained by the county. Commissioner of Health : 
—Dr. J. E. Crichton. 

SPOKANE (104,402) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed on October 18, 1901. Tuberculosis was included 
in the list of diseases to be reported in 1901. The city employs three visiting nurses, and 
distributes considerable literature to patients and others. Premises are disinfected at death 
and removal. Circulars are distributed to patients and their families. Health Officer: — 
Dr. M. B. Grieve. 

TACOMA (82,972) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1908. Tuberculosis was made reportable in 
1906. Premises are disinfected at death and removal. Health Officer; — Dr. E. M. Brown. 



WEST VIRGINIA 

STATE LEGISLATION 

1908. — A special session of the State Legislature adopted a resolution appointing a com- 
mittee of five to make a study of the tuberculosis situation in West Virginia, and 

254 



LEGISLATION WISCONSIN 

to report on the methods, construction, and operation of a State sanatorium for 

consumptives. Such commission was also to locate a site for said sanatorium. 
1909. — The report of the committee appointed in 1908 was presented, but the legislature 

refused to grant an appropriation. 
1911. — In February, the Legislature voted $40,000 for a state sanatorium to be erected and 

maintained by the State Board of Control and Health. 
Secretary State Board of Health: — Dr. H. A. Barbee, Point Pleasant. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

Y/HEELING (41,641) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed November 11, 1902. A special ordinance passed 
April 14, 1908, made the reporting of tuberculosis compulsory. Premises are disinfected at 
death and removal. Literature is distributed to patients and physicians. Health Officer: 
—Dr. W. H. McLain. 



WISCONSIN 



STATE LEGISLATION 

1903. — An act was passed authorizing the governor to appoint three commissioners to in- 
vestigate conditions relative to tuberculosis, and to report on the feasibility of 
a State sanatorium in 1904. 

1905. — An act was passed authorizing that 2,000 copies of the report of the above commis- 
sion be printed. 

1905. — An act was passed providing for the establishment of a State sanatorium for tu- 
berculosis. Ninety thousand dollars was appropriated by this act for construction 
and $25,000 for maintenance. 

1907. — An additional amount of $30,000 was appropriated for construction purposes and 
$40,000 for maintenance for this institution. 

1907. — Chapter 93 of the laws of 1907 amends the health laws so that tuberculosis is in- 
cluded in the list of diseases that must be reported by the attending physicians to 
the department of health in their own city. This act also provides for the disin- 
fection and renovation of premises after death or removal of a tuberculous patient. 

1909. — A permanent livestock board was created by the legislature. 

1909. — The State Sanatorium law was amended, particularly with reference to the appoint- 
ment of an advisory board. 

1909. — The Legislature of 1909 appropriated the sum of $40,000 for the purpose of erecting 
an infirmary, two cottages for patients, a superintendent's residence, and two cot- 
tages for employees and a bakery at the State Tuberculosis Sanatorium at Wales. 
Secretary State Board of Health :^Dr. C. A. Harper, Madison. 

MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION 

LACROSSE (30,417) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1902. The State registration law is well en- 
forced. An ordinance was passed in 1910 under which a physician will be employed to 
take charge of all tuberculosis work for the city. Premises are disinfected at death and 
removal. Health Officer: — Dr. A. M. Murphy. 

MILWAUKEE (373,857) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1905. There is no local ordinance requiring the 
reporting of tuberculosis. Premises are disinfected and renovated at death and removal. 
Circulars are distributed to the public from time to time. There is a pure milk ordinance. 
The county will open in 191 1 a hospital for thirty-five advanced cases. Commissioner of 
Health: — Dr. F. A. Kraft. Secretary Health Department: — ^A. B. Cargill. 

2SS 



LEGISLATION WYOMING 

OSHKOSH (33,062) 

An anti-spitting ordinance was passed in 1905. There is no local ordinance requiring 
the reporting of tuberculosis. Premises are disinfected at death. Health Officer: — Dr. 
A. H. Broche. 

RACINE (38,002) 

An anli-spitling ordinance was passed in November, igo6. Premises are disinfected 
at death and removal. Circulars are distributed to physicians. One visiting nurse is 
employed by the Health Department. Health Officer: — Dr. Henry C. Baker. 

SUPERIOR (40,384) 

There is a local anti-spitling ordinance. Tuberculosis was included in the list of infec- 
tious diseases to be reported in November 2, 1910. The county in 1910 appropriated $7,000 
for a tuberculosis hospital. Health Officer: — Dr. P. G. McGill. Secretary Board of 
Health:— Dr. J. M. Morrison. 



WYOMING 



STATE LEGISLATION 

There is no legislation affecting tuberculosis, but regulations of the State Board of 
Health require the reporting of tuberculosis with other communicable diseases. Secretary 
State Board of Health: — Dr. Amos W. Barber, Cheyenne. 



256 



Typical Laws 



I. NOTIFICATION LAWS 

The full texts of the notification and registration laws of New York, District of Columbia, 
and Wisconsin are herewith given. The New York law is the most comprehensive of the 
three and deals only with tuberculosis. This act is patterned largely after the Maryland law, 
but includes several new features of value. The District of Columbia law is a'shorter act, but 
similar to the New York law. The Wisconsin law is of a different character from the other 
two. In this law tuberculosis is included in the list of diseases to be reported, but several 
sections deal specifically with this disease. 

NEW YORK 

AN ACT defining the powers and duties of local health ofi&cers and boards of health in the 
matter of the protection of the people of the State of New York from the disease known 
as tuberculosis. 

[Became a law, May 19, 1908, with the approval of the Governor. Passed, three-fifths being present.] 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and. Assembly, do enact as follows: 

Section 320. Reports by physicians and others. — Tuberculosis is hereby declared to be 
an infectious and communicable disease, dangerous to the public health. It shall be the duty 
of every physician in the state of New York, to report in writing, on a form to be furnished 
as hereinafter provided, the name, age, sex, color, occupation, place where last employed, 
if known, and address, of every person known by said physician to have tuberculosis, to the 
health officer of the city, town or village in which said person resides, within twenty-four 
hours after such fact comes to the knowledge of said physician. It shall also be the duty of 
the chief ofiicer having charge for the time being of any hospital, dispensary, asylum or other 
similar private or public institution in said state of New York to report in Hke manner the 
name, age, sex, color, occupation, place where last employed if known, and previous address 
of every patient having tuberculosis who comes into his care or under his observation, within 
twenty-four hours thereafter. 

Sec. 321. Examination of sputum. — It shall be the duty of every health officer of a city, 
town or village, when so requested by any physician, or by authorities of any hospital or dis- 
pensary, to make or cause to be made a microscopical examination of the sputum forwarded 
to him as that of a. person having symptoms of tuberculosis, which shall be forwarded to such 
officer accompanied by a blank giving name, age, sex, color, occupation, place where last 
employed if known, and address of the person whose sputum it is. It shall be the duty of 
said health ofiicer promptly to make a report of the resiilts of such examination, free ot charge, 
to the physician or person upon whose apphcation the same is made. 

Sec. 322. Protection of records. — It shall be the duty of every health officer of a city, 
town or village to cause all reports made in accordance with the provisions of the first section 
of this act, and also all results of examinations, showing the presence of the bacilli of tubercu- 
losis, made in accordance with the provisions of second section of this act, to be recorded in 
a register, of which he shall be the custodian. Such register shall not be open to inspection 
by any person other than the health authorities of the state and of the said city, town or 
village, and said health authorities shall not permit any such report or record to be diviUged 

17 257 



LEGISLATION NOTIFICATION LAWS 

so as to disclose the identity of the person to whom it relates, except as may be necessary to 
carry into effect the provisions of this act. 

Sec. 323. Disinfection of premises. — In case of the vacation of any apartment or premises 
by the death or removal therefrom of a person having tuberculosis, it shall be the duty of 
the attending physician, or if there be no such physician, or if such phj-sician be absent, of 
the owner, lessee, occupant, or other person having charge of the said apartments or premises, 
to notif)' the health oflker of said city, town or village, of said death or removal within twenty- 
four hours thereafter, and such apartments or premises so vacated shall not again be occupied 
until dul}' disinfected, cleansed or renovated as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 324. Health officer to direct disinfection, cleansifig or renovation. — When notified of 
the vacation of any apartments or premises as provided in section three hundred and twenty- 
three thereof, the local health ofhcer or one of his assistants or deputies, shall within twenty- 
four hours thereafter visit said apartments or premises and shall order and direct that, except 
for purposes of cleansing or disinfection, no infected article shall be removed therefrom until 
properly and suitably cleansed or disinfected, and said health ofhcer shall determine the 
manner in which such apartments or premises shall be disinfected, cleansed or renovated in 
order that thej' may be rendered safe and suitable for occupancy. If the health authorities 
determine that disinfection is sufficient to render them safe and suitable for occupancj^ such 
apartments or premises together with all infected articles therein, shall immediately be dis- 
infected by the health authorities at public expense, or, if the owner prefers, by the owner 
at his expense, to the satisfaction of the health authorities, pro\ided, however, that in any 
locality which in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health may be considered a resort 
for persons having tuberculosis, such disinfection may in the discretion of the health authori- 
ties be done by such health authorities at the expense of the owner of the premises. Should 
the health authorities determine that such apartments or premises are in need of thorough 
cleansing and renovation, a notice in writing to this effect shall be served upon the owner or 
agent of said apartments or premises, and said owner or agent shall thereupon proceed to 
the cleansing or renovating of such apartments or premises in accordance with the instructions 
of the health authorities, and such cleansing and renovation shall be done at the expense of 
the said owner or agent. In any case in which the owner is liable for the expense of such 
disinfection, cleansing or renovation by or pursuant to the provisions of this section, such 
expense if not paid shall be a first lien upon such property, real or personal, so disinfected, 
cleansed or renovated, having preference over all other liens and incumbrances whatever. 
If the lien is against real property, it may be foreclosed in the manner prescribed in section 
thirty-two of the public health law; if the lien is against personal property it may be fore- 
closed in the manner prescribed in sections two hundred and six to two hundred and nine, 
inclusive, of the hen law. 

Sec. 325. Prohihiling occupancy until order of health officer is complied with. — In case 
the orders or directions of the local health officer requiring the disinfection, cleansing or reno- 
vation of any apartments or premises or any articles therein as hereinbefore provided, shall 
not be complied with within forty-eight hours after such orders or directions shall be given, 
the health officer may cause a placard in words and form substantially as follows to be placed 
upon the door of the infected apartments or premises: 

"Tuberculosis is a commvmicable disease. These apartments have been occupied by 
a consumptive and may be infected. They must not be occupied until the order of the health 
officer directing their disinfection or renovation has been complied with. This notice must 
not be removed under the penalty of the law except by the health officer or other duly author- 
ized official." 

Sec. 326. Prohibiting carelessness of a person having tuhercnlosis. — Any person having 
tuberculosis who shall dispose of his sputum, saUva or other bodily secretion or excretion so 
as to cause offense or danger to any person or persons occupying the same room or apartment, 
house, or part of a house, shall on complaint of any person or persons subjected to such offense 
or danger, be deemed guilty of a nuisance and any persons subjected to such a nuisance may 
make complaint in person or writing to the health officer of any city, town or village where 
the nuisance complained of is committed. And it shall be the duty of the local health officer 
receiving such complaint to investigate, and if it appears that the nuisance complained of is 
such as to cause offense or danger to any person occupying the same room, apartment, house 
or part of a house, he shall serve a notice upon the person so complained of, reciting the 

258 



LEGISLATION NOTIFICATION LAWS 

alleged cause of offense or danger and requiring him to dispose of his sputum, saliva or other 
bodily secretion or excretion in such a manner as to remove all reasonable cause of offense 
or danger. Any person failing or refusing to comply with orders or regulations of the local 
health officer of any city, town or village, requiring him to cease to commit such nuisance, 
shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction thereof shall be fined not more 
than ten dollars. 

Sec. 327. Protection of patienf s family . — It shall be the duty of a physician attending a 
patient having tuberculosis to take all proper precautions and to give proper instructions to 
provide for the safety of all individuals occupying the same house or apartment, and if no 
physician be attending such patient this duty shall devolve upon the local health officer, and 
all duties imposed upon physicians by any sections of this act shall be performed by the local 
health officer in all cases of tuberculosis not attended by a physician, or when the physician 
fails to perform the duties herein specified, and shall so report. 

Sec. 328. Providing that physicians shall make a complete statement of procedure and 
precautions on a blank to he furnished by the health officer, et cetera. — It shall be the duty of the 
local health officer to transmit to a physician reporting a case of tuberculosis as provided in 
section one of this act, a printed statement and report, in a form approved bythe state com- 
missioner of health, naming such procedures and precautions as in the opinion of the said 
commissioner are necessary or desirable to be taken on the premises of a tuberculosis patient. 
It shall be the duty of the local health authorities to print and keep on hand an ample supply 
of such statements and reports and to furnish the same in sufficient numbers to all local physi- 
cians. Upon receipt of such statement and report the physician shall either carry into effect 
aU such procedures and precautions as are therein prescribed, and shall thereupon sign and 
date the same and return it to the local health officer without delay, or, if such attending 
physician be unwilling or unable to carry into effect the procedures and precautions specified, 
he shall so state upon this report and immediately return the same to the local health officer 
and the duties therein prescribed shall thereupon devolve upon said local health officer who 
shall receive the fee hereinafter provided as payment of the services of the physician if he 
comply with the duties herein prescribed. Upon receipt of this statement and report the 
local health officer shall carefully examine the same, and if satisfied that the attending physi- 
cian has taken all necessary and desirable precautions to insure the safety of all persons living 
in the apartments or premises occupied by the person having tuberculosis, the said local 
health officer shall issue an order upon the treasurer of the city, town or village in favor of 
the attending physician for the sum of one dollar, thereupon to be paid out of a fund which 
shall be provided by said citj^, town or village. If the precautions taken or instructions 
given by the attending physician are, in the opinion of the local health officer, not such as 
will remove all reasonable danger or probability of danger to the persons occupying the said 
house or apartments or premises the local health officer shall return to the attending physician 
the report with a letter specifying the additional precautions or instructions which the 
health officer shall require him to take or give; and the said attending physician shall immedi- 
ately take the additional precautions and give the additional instructions specified and shall re- 
cord and return the same on the original report to the local health officer. It shall further be the 
duty of the local health officer to transmit to the physician reporting any case of tuberculosis 
a printed requisition, in a form approved by the State Commissioner of Health, and printed by 
the local health authorities and issued in sufficient nmnber to supply local physicians. Upon 
this requisition blank, shall be named the materials kept on hand by the local health officer 
for the prevention of the spread of tuberculosis and it shall be the duty of the local health 
officer to supply such materials as may be specified in such requisition. Any ph3^sician 
may return a duly signed requisition to the local health officer for such of the specified materials 
and in such amount as he may deem necessary to aid him in preventing the spread of the 
disease, and all local health officers shall honor, as far as possible, a requisition signed by the 
attending physician in such case. It shall be the duty of every local health officer to transmit 
to every physician reporting any case of tuberculosis, or to the person reported as suffering 
from this disease, provided the latter has no attending physician, a circular of iniormaticn 
approved by the State Commissioner of Health and which shall be provided in sufficient quantit}- 
by the local health authorities. This circular of information shall inform the consumptive 
of the best methods of treatment of his disease and of the precautions necessary to avoid 
transmitting the disease to others. 

259 



LEGISLATION NOTIFICATION LAWS 

Sec. 329. Penalty for failure of physician to perform duties or for making false reports. — 
Any physician or person practising as a physician who shall knowingly report as affected 
with tuberculosis any person who is not so affected, or who shall wilfully make any false 
statement concerning the name, age, sex, color, occupation, place where last employed if 
known, or address of anj' person reported as affected with tuberculosis, or who shall certify 
falsely as to any of the precautions taken to prevent the spread of infection, shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be subject to a fine of not more than 
one hundred dollars. 

Sec. 330. Reporting recovery of patient. — Upon the recovery of any person having tu- 
berculosis, it shall be the duty of the attending physician to make a report of this fact to the 
local health officer, who shall record the same in the records of his office, and shall relieve 
said person from further hability to any requirements imposed by this act. 

Sec. 331. General penalty. — Any person violating any of the provisions of this act shall 
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be punished, e.xcept 
as herein otherwise provided, by a fine of not less than five dollars nor more than fifty dollars. 

Sec. 332. Repealing all acts, el cetera.- — All acts and parts of acts contrary to or incon- 
sistent with the provisions of this act are hereby repealed, except that no portion of this act 
shall apply to the city of New York, nor shall the passage of this act modify or repeal any 
of the provisions of the charter of the city of New York, or any rule or regulation issued by 
the department of health of said New York City. 

Sec. 333. This act shall take effect immediately. 

[Chapter 351, Laws of 1908, and Sections 330-33, of Public Health ;Law, constituting 
Chapter 45, as amended June 8, 1910.] 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

AN ACT to provide for registration of all cases of tuberculosis in the District of Columbia, 
for free examination of sputum in suspected cases, and for preventing the spread of tuber- 
culosis in said District. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Slates of America in 
Congress assembled: 

Section i. That it shall be the duty of every physician in the District of Columbia to 
report in writing to the health oflicer of said District, within one week after the disease is 
recognized, on fonns to be provided by said health officer, the name, age, sex, color, occupa- 
tion, and address of every person under his care in said District who, in his opinion, is aflficted 
with pulmonary or other cormnunicable form of tuberculosis. It shall also be the duty of 
the officer having charge for the time being of each and every hospital, dispensar}"-, asylum, 
or other similar public or private institution in said District to report in like manner the name, 
age, sex, color, occupation, and last address of eveiy person who is in his care or who has 
come under his observation within one week of such time who, in his opinion, is afSicted with 
pulmonary or other communicable form of tuberculosis. 

Sec. 2. That the health officer of said District shall promptly make, or cause to be made 
by a competent microscopist, a microscopical examination of the .sputum of persons thus 
reported, and shall make a report thereof, free of charge, to the physician or officer upon whose 
application the examination was made. If the examination fails to show the existence of 
the disease that fact shall be recorded. 

Sec. 3. That the health officer of said District shall cause all cases showing the presence 
of tubercle bacilli to be recorded in a register of which he shall be the custodian, which register 
shall not be open to inspection by anyone except the health officer and the deputy health 
officer of said District, and neither said health officer nor said deputy health officer shall 
permit any such record to be divulged in such manner as to disclose the identity of the person 
to whom it relates except as it may be necessary in carrying out the provisions of this Act. 

Sec. 4. That it shall be the duty of the health department, in every case where a micro- 
scopical e.xamination reveals the existence of tuberculosis, to supply to such person, or those 

260 



LEGISLATION NOTIFICATION LAWS 

in charge of such person, unless otherwise requested by the attending physician, printed 
instructions as to the methods to be employed to prevent the spread of the disease. 

Sec. s. That in case of death from pulmonary or other communicable form of tuberculosis, 
or the removal from any apartment or premises of a person or persons so afflicted, it shall be 
the duty of the attending physician, if he has such knowledge, or, if there be no such physician 
or if such physician be absent, of the occupant, or other person in charge of said apartment 
or premises to notify the health officer, in writing, of such death, within twenty-four hours 
thereafter, and such apartment or premises shall then be disinfected by the health department 
at public expense or, if the owner prefers, by the owner to the satisfaction of the health de- 
partment, and shall not again be occupied imtil so disinfected. 

Sec. 6. That it shall be the duty of every person afflicted with tuberculosis, and of every 
person in attendance upon anyone afflicted therewith, and of the authorities of public and 
private institutions or dispensaries in said District to observe and enforce all sanitary rules 
and regulations of the Commissioners of the District of Columbia for preventing the spread 
of the disease. 

Sec. 7. That upon the recovery of any person who has been found to be suffering from 
tuberculosis a report to that effect to the health department, made by the attending physician, 
shall be recorded in the register aforesaid, and shall relieve said person from further liability 
to any requirements imposed by this Act. 

Sec. 8. That any person violating any of the provisions of this Act shall, upon conviction 
thereof, be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be punished by a fine not exceeding 
twenty-five dollars. 

Sec. 9. That all prosecutions under this Act shall be in the police court of said District 
upon information brought in the name of the District of Columbia and on its behalf. 

Sec. 10. That all Acts and parts of Acts contrary to or inconsistent with the provisions 
of this Act be, and they are hereby, repealed. 
Approved May 13, 1908. 
[Public Acts of 1908, No. 114.I 

WISCONSIN 

AN ACT prescribing the duties of physicians and others relative to infectious diseases. 

The people of the State of Wisconsin, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows: 

Section i. It shall be the duty of every physician to report to the department of health 
in every town, incorporated village or city, in writing, the full name, age and address of every 
person suffering from any one of the infectious or contagious diseases following, to wit: Measles, 
smallpox, diphtheria (membranous croup), scarlet fever (scarlatina), typhoid fever, tuber- 
culosis (of any organ), rubella (rotheln), chickenpox, typhus fever, plague, erysipelas, Asiatic 
cholera, whooping cough, cerebro-spinal meningitis, yellow fever, and it shall be the duty of 
every person, owner, agent, manager, principal or superintendent of any public or private 
institution or dispensary, hotel, boarding or lodging house, in any such town, incorporated 
village or city, to make a report, in like maimer and form, of any inmate, occupant or boarder 
suffering from any of the said infectious or contagious diseases. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of every physician to report forthwith in writing to the said 
department of health, the death of any person who dies from, or while suffering with or from 
any infectious or contagious disease, and to state in such report the specific name and tjqae 
of such disease, and in the absence of an attending physician, it shall be the duty of ever}' 
keeper of any boarding house or lodging house, and the proprietor of every lodging house or 
hotel, to report forthwith to the department of health, all known facts in regard to any person 
who died in any such house or hotel under his charge suffering from any of the following 
infectious or contagious diseases: Measles, diphtheria (membranous croup), scarlet fever, 
t3^hoid fever, tuberculosis, smallpox, chickenpox, Asiatic cholera, typhus fever, rubella 
(rotheln), plague, v/hooping cough, within twenty-four hours after the death of such person. 

261 



LEGISLATION NOTIFICATION LAWS 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of every person having knowledge of the existence of any 
person afflicted with any one of the following infectious or contagious diseases, to wit: IMeaslcs, 
diphtheria (membranous croup), scarlet fever, typhoid fever, tuberculosis, smallpox, Asiatic 
cholera, t>T3hus fever, rubella (rotheln), plague, and whooping cough, or has reason to believe 
that any person is so afflicted, to at once report to the health department of such town, in- 
corporated village or city, all facts in regard to the case, and no person shall interfere with 
or obstruct the entrance, inspection or examination of any building or house, or the occupants 
thereof, by the health officer, commissioner of health or his assistants, of such town, incor- 
porated village or cit)', or any officers of such department, when investigating a reported 
case of one of the infectious or contagious diseases above specified, as existing in such house 
or dwelling, nor shall any person interfere with or obstruct, mutilate, or tear down any notices 
of such department posted in or on any premises within such municipality. 

Sec. 4. I. It shall be the duty of every physician or person, or owner, agent, manager, 
principal or superintendent of each and every public or private institution or dispensary, 
hotel, boarding or lodging house, in any such town, incorporated village or city, to report 
to the department of health thereof, in writing, or to cause such report to be made by some 
proper and competent person, the name, age, sex, occupation and latest address of every 
person afflicted with tuberculosis, who is in their care, or who has come under their obser\'ation, 
within one week of such time. 

2. It shall be the duty of every person sick with this disease, and of every person in 
attendance upon any one sick with tliis disease, and of the authorities of public or private 
institutions, or dispensaries to observe and enforce all the sanitary rules and regulations of 
such health department for preventing the spread of pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Sec. 5. In case of the vacation of any apartment or premises by death from tuberculosis, 
or by the removal therefrom of a person or persons sick with tuberculosis, it shall be the duty 
of the person or physician in charge, to notify the commissioner of health of such town, in- 
corporated village or city, aforesaid, of said removal, within twenty-four hours thereafter, 
and such apartments or premises so vacated shall not again be occupied until duly renovated 
and disinfected as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 6. In case of the vacation of any premises or apartments as set out in section 5 
of this act, the commissioner of health, or health officer, shall immediately visit said premises, 
and shall order and direct that such premises or apartments and all infected articles therein 
be properly and suitably disinfected. In case there shall be no remaining occupants in such 
premises or apartments, and same shall be vacant, then the commissioner of health or health 
officer shall cause a notice in writing to be served upon the owner, or agent of the owner of 
such premises or apartments, ordering the renovation and disinfection of such premises or 
apartments, under the direction of and in conformity with the regulations of the local depart- 
ment of health. 

Sec. 7. In case any orders or directions of the commissioner of health or health officer 
requiring the disinfection of any articles, premises or apartments, as hereinbefore provided, 
shall not be complied with within thirty-six hours after such orders or directions shall be 
given, then it shall be the duty of the commissioner of health or health officer to cause a 
placard in words and form as follows, to be placed upon the door of the infected apartments, 
or premises, to wit: 

NOTICE 

Tuberculosis is a communicable disease. These apartments have been occupied by a con- 
sumptive and viay be injected. They must not be occupied until the order of the health commissioner 
or health officer directing their renovation and disinfection has been complied with. 

This notice must not be removed under a penalty of law, except by the commissioner of health, 
or an authorized officer. 

Sec. 8. Any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, and any person 
who, without written authority from the commissioner of health or health officer shall remove, 
or cause to be removed any placard placed upon premises or apartments which are or have 
been occupied by persons sick with any of the diseases mentioned in section i, upon conviction 
thereof, shall be fined not less than five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars or by 
imprisonment in the count}' jail for not less than five days nor more than ninety days. 

262 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

Sec. 9. The provisions of this act shall not be construed as a limitation upon the officers 
of the common council of any city to pass such ordinances in aid of the officers of the commis- 
sioner of health as may tend to promote and secure the general health of the inhabitants of 
such city. 

Sec. 10. All acts or parts of acts, including the provisions of any special charter, contra- 
vening the provisions of this act, are hereby repealed. 

Sec. II. There are added to the statutes of 1898 four new sections to read: Section 
1416 — 5. Any person affected with tuberculosis of the lungs or larynx, or any other disease 
whose virus or infecting agent is contained in the sputum or other secretions, shall not deposit 
liis sputum, saHva or other infectious secretion, in such a place as to cause offense or danger 
of contracting the disease to any person or persons. 

Sec. 1416 — 6. It shall be the duty of every person afflicted with tuberculosis of the 
lungs or larynx, or any other disease whose virus or infecting agent is contained in the sputum, 
saUva or other infectious secretions, to provide himself with a sputum flask or receptacle in 
which to deposit his sputum, saliva, or other infectious secretion, while traveUng in any 
public conveyance or attending any public place, and the contents of said flask or receptacle 
shall be burned or otherwise thoroughly disinfected. 

Sec. 1416 — 7. Upon the complaint of any responsible person the local board of 
health shall at once investigate the conditions complained of and if found dangerous or 
detrimental to the public health said board shall make and enforce such orders as may be 
necessary to abate the offense or dangers caused thereby. 

Sec. 1416 — II. For the purpose of this act railroad conductors or other persons in 
charge of common carriers may exercise the powers of sheriffs and constables. 

[Chapter 93, Laws of 1907.] 



II. SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

The full text of the State sanatorium acts of Massachusetts and Michigan is herewith 
given. The former is of particular interest, as it is the first act of this kind to be passed in 
the United States. In addition to these two, the Ohio and New York laws, which provide 
for county hospitals, are also given. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

AN ACT to establish the Massachusetts Hospital for Consumptives and Tubercular Patients. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section i. The governor, with the advice and consent of the council, shaU appoint five 
persons who shall constitute the Board of Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Con- 
svunptives and Tubercular Patients, and who shall hold office for terms of one, two, three, 
four and five years respectively, beginning with the first Monday of July in the pres- 
ent year, and until their respective successors are appointed and qualified; and pre\a- 
ous to the first Monday in July in each year thereafter the governor shall in like manner 
appoint one such trustee to hold office for the term of five years, beginning with the first 
Monday in July of the year of his appointment, and until his successor is_ appointed and 
quahfied. Any such trustee may be removed by the governor with the advice and consent 
of the council for such cause as they may deem sufficient and as shall be assigned in the order 
of removal. Any vacancy occurring in said board shall be filled in like manner for the un- 
expired term. 

263 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

Sec. 2. The lands held by said trustees in trust for the Commonwealth for tlie use of said 
hospital, as hereinafter provided, shall not be taken for a street, highway or railroad without 
leave of the legislature specially obtained. 

Sec. 3. Said trustees shall be a corporation for the same purposes for which the trustees 
of each of the state lunatic hospitals are made a corporation by section five of chapter eighty- 
seven of the Pubhc Statutes, with all the powers necessary to carry said purposes into effect. 

Sec. 4. Said trustees shall have authority to purchase in behalf of the Commonwealth 
suitable real estate as a site for said hospital, and to cause to be erected thereon suitable 
buildings for said hospital which shall furnish suitable accommodations for not less than two 
hundred patients and for the officers, employees and attendants, and to provide for the 
equipment and furnishing of said buildings: provided, however, that the e.xpenditure for 
carrying out the purposes of this act shall not exceed one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 
No expenditure shall be made for the erection of buildings except for plans therefor, until said 
plans have been approved by the governor and council, and no such approval shall be given 
unless the governor and coimcil shall be satisfied that the cost of the real estate and the erection 
and completion of buildings and the equipment and furnishing of the same ready for occu- 
pancy will not exceed one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The trustees shall have 
authority to make all contracts and employ all agents necessary to carry into effect the 
provisions of this act. 

Sec. 5. Said trustees shall have the same powers and shall be required to perform the 
same duties in the management and control of said hospital as are vested in and required of 
the trustees of the various state lunatic hospitals under sections six, seven and nine of chapter 
eighty-seven of the Public Statutes. 

Sec. 6. When the buildings constructed under the provisions of this act are so far com- 
pleted that in the opinion of said trustees they may be properly used for the purposes of said 
hospital, said trustees shall notify the governor, who shall thereupon issue his proclamation 
establishing said hospital. 

Sec. 7. After the establishment of said hospital said trustees shall receive no compensa- 
tion for their services, but they shall be reimbursed from the treasury of the Commonwealth 
for all expenses actually incurred by them in the performance of their official duties. The 
governor and council shall fix the compensation to be paid to them for ser\'ices rendered in the 
selection and purchase of real estate and the construction, equipment and furnishing of the 
hospital buildings. 

Sec. 8. Said trustees may appoint the physicians, assistants and employees necessary 
for the proper administration of the affairs of said hospital and may incur all expenses neces- 
sarj' for the maintenance of the same. Said trustees shall provide homeopathic medical 
treatment for all patients who desire it and for that purpose shall appoint such number of 
homeopathic physicians as may be necessary. 

Sec. 9. The charges for the support of the inmates of said hospitals as are of sufiicient 
ability to pay for the same, or have persons or kindred bound by law to maintain them, 
shall be paid by such iimaates, such persons, or such kindred at a rate to be determined by the 
trustees of said hospital. The board of such inmates as have a legal settlement in some city 
or town shall be paid by said city or town if such patients are received at said hospital on the 
request of the overseers of the poor of said city or town. The trustees may in their discretion 
receive other patients who have no means to pay for treatment; and the board of all such 
patients shall be paid from the treasury of the Commonwealth. 

Sec. 10. There shall be a thorough visitation of said hospital by two of the trustees 
thereof monthly, and by a majority of them quarterly, and by the whole board semi-annually, 
at each of which a written report of the state of the institution shall be drawn up, which shall 
be presented at the annual meeting to be held between the first day of October and the first 
day of November. At the annual meeting the trustees shall make a detailed report in the 
same manner as is required of the trustees of the state lunatic hospitals, and shall audit the 
report of the treasurer, which shall be presented at said annual meeting, and transmit it with 
their aimual report to the governor and council. 

Sec. II. The accounts and books of the treasvurer shall at all times be open to the inspec- 
tion of the trustees. 

264 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

Sec. 12. For the purpose of meeting any expenses that may be incurred under the pro- 
visions of this act the treasurer and receiver-general is hereby authorized, with the approval 
of the governor and council, to issue scrip or certificates of indebtedness to an amount not 
exceeding one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, for a term not exceeding thirty years. 
Said scrip or certificates of indebtedness shall be issued as registered bonds or with interest 
coupons attached, and shall bear interest not exceeding four per cent, per annum, payable 
semi-annually on the first days of May and November in each year. Such scrip or certificates 
of indebtedness shall be designated on the face thereof as the Hospital for Consumptives' 
Loan, shall be countersigned by the governor and shall be deemed a pledge of the faith and 
credit of the Commonwealth, and the principal and interest shall be paid at the times specified 
therein in gold coin of the tjnited States or its equivalent; and said scrip or certificates of 
indebtedness shall be sold and disposed of at public auction, or in such other mode, and at 
such time and prices, and in such amounts (the rate of interest not to exceed the rate above 
specified) as shall be deemed best. The sinking fund estabHshed by chapter three hundred 
and ninety-one of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and seventy-four, known as the prison 
and hospital loan sinking fund, shall also be maintained for the purpose of extinguishing 
bonds issued under the authority of this act, and the treasurer and receiver-general shall 
apportion thereto from year to year an amount sufiicient with the accumulations of said 
fund to extinguish at maturity the debt incurred by the issue of said bonds. The amount 
necessary to meet the annual sinking fund requirements and to pay the interest on said bonds 
shall be raised by taxation from year to year. 

Sec. 13. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
Approved June 5, 1895. 
[Chapter 503, Laws of 1895.] 

MICHIGAN 

AN ACT to establish a State Sanatorium in some suitable locality in Michigan, for the care 
and treatment of persons having tuberculosis, and making appropriations therefor, and 
to provide a tax to meet the same. 

The People of the State of Michigan enact : 

Section i. That a State Sanatorium for the care and treatment of tuberculous persons, 
in some suitable locaHty in Michigan be and hereby is established. 

Sec. 2. The Governor shall appoint six citizens of this State, four of whom shall be legally 
registered physicians, who shall constitute the board of trustees of the State Sanatorium. 
The term of office of each trustee shall be six years, the terms of two members of such board 
expiring every two years. To effect such order of expiration of term of office, the first appoint- 
ment shall be made for the respective terms of two, four and six years. Thereafter there 
shall be appointed by the Governor, with the consent of the Senate, two members every 
two years. Any such trustee may be removed by the Governor for such cause as the Governor 
may deem sufficient, after an opportunity to be heard in his ovm. defense has been granted 
him. Any vacancy arising in said board by reason of removal, accepted resignation, or by 
death, shall be filled for the unexpired term by appointment in like manner as in the first 
instance. A majority of the board shall constitute a quorum, but no business shall be trans- 
acted except by the affirmative vote of at least three members of said board. 

Sec. 3. For the purpose of this act, the board of trustees and their successors in office 
shall be a body corporate, with all the powers necessary to carry into effect this act. 

Sec. 4. Said board of trustees shall have the general control of the property and affairs 
of the Sanatorium, and shall take such action as shall be necessary to carry out the purposes 
of this act. 

Sec. 5. The board of trustees shall appoint a medical superintendent, not a member of 
said board, who shall be a legally quaUfied physician, of at least six years' experience in the 
practice of his profession, and who shall be chosen with a special view to his professional 
and executive ability. Such medical superintendent shall, in all matters pertaining to the 
Sanatorium, be under the general supervision of the board of trustees, who may remove 
him at any time and appoint his successor. 

26s 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

Sec. 6. Said board of trustees shall elect from the members a president, and shall appoint 
a secretary, and a treasurer. The treasurer shall give a bond to the people of the State of 
INIichigan for the faithful performance of his trust, in the penal sum of twenty-five thousand 
dollars, to be approved by the Governor and filed with the Secretary of State. Said secretary 
or treasurer may at any time be removed, and his successor appointed, by the Governor on 
the recommendation of said board of trustees in its discretion. 

Sec. 7. The medical superintendent, with the consent of the board of trustees, shall 
appoint such other officers, assistants and employees in and for the Sanatorium as may be, 
from time to time, necessary to carry into effect this act: Provided, however, That all medical 
officers shall be well educated physicians. All such officers, assistants and employees shall 
be under the direct supervision of the medical superintendent, and may be removed by him. 
In case of removal by the medical superintendent of an}' such oflicers, assistants or employees, 
said medical superintendent shall forthwith report the same to the said board of trustees. 

Sec. 8. The board of trustees shall, from time to time, determine the salaries and allow- 
ances of the officers, assistants and employees of said Sanatorium: Provided, That the salary 
of said medical superintendent shall not e.xceed the sum of two thousand dollars annually. 

Sec. 9. The board of trustees is hereby directed to establish such by-laws as it maj' deem 
necessary and expedient for defining the duties of officers, assistants and employees, for fixing 
the conditions of admission, support and discharge of patients, and for conducting in a proper 
manner the professional and business affairs, also to ordain and enforce a suitable system 
of rules and regulations for the internal government, discipline and management of the Sana- 
toriimi. 

Sec. id. The board of trustees shall have authority, and it is hereby made the duty of 
said board on behalf of the State to receive by gift or grant, real estate consisting of State 
tax homestead lands as a site for said Sanatorium: Provided, That said lands are situated in 
some county of this State where the conditions are most favorable for the treatment of persons 
afflicted with tuberculosis. Said board shall have power to receive and hold property or 
money as endowment or otherwise for said Sanatorium, or to purchase a site and to cause to 
be erected thereon suitable buildings for said Sanatorium and to provide for the equipment of 
said buildings. If the said board can find a suitable tract of State tax homestead land upon 
which to erect said institution, consisting of any number of acres, the Commissioner of the 
State Land Office shall withdraw and withhold from said entry and sale said tract of lands 
subject to control and disposition of his department and to convey the same by deed of the 
Commissioner of the Land Office to said board of trustees as a site for said Sanatorium. 
The trustees shall have power to make all contracts and employ all agents necessary to carry 
into effect this act. 

Sec. II. Said board shall meet at the Sanatorium at least semi-annually, at which time 
a written report of the aff'airs and conditions of the Sanatorium and of the patients therein, 
to be prepared by the medical superintendent, shall be submitted to and carefully examined 
by the board. The board shaO at such meetings personally inspect the Sanatorium, and shall 
examine and audit all bills and accounts. At the annual meeting, which shall be held in 
July, the board of trustees shall make a detailed report and shall examine the report and audit 
the accounts of the treasurer, which shall be presented at said annual meeting, and shall 
transmit it with their annual report to the Governor, for publication by the Board of State 
Auditors. 

Sec. 12. The board of trustees shall receive no compensation for their services, but ex- 
penses incurred in the performance of their duties shall be audited by the board of trustees, 
certified by the president and secretary, and paid by its treasurer. 

Sec. 13. The medical superintendent shall be chief executive officer of the Sanatorium. 
He shall have general superintendence of the buildings, grounds, furniture, fixtures, and stock, 
and the direction and control of all persons therein, subject to the by-laws and regulations 
established bj' the board of trustees. He or his representative shall daily ascertain the con- 
dition of each and all the patients, and prescribe or direct their treatment. He shall cause 
full and fair records of all his official acts and the entire business and operation of the Sana- 
torium to be kept regularly, from day to day, in books provided for that purpose, in the manner 
and to the extent prescribed in the lay-laws, and he shall see that all the accounts and records 
are fully made up to the last day of June and present the same to the board of trustees at 

266 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

their annual meeting. It shall be the duty of the medical superintendent to admit any of 
the board of trustees into every part of the Sanatorium, and to exhibit to him or them, on 
demand, all the books, papers, accounts, and writings belonging to the Sanatorium, or jjer- 
taining to its business, management, discipline, or government; also to furnish copies, ab- 
stracts, and reports whenever required so to do by said board. The medical superintendent 
shall make, in a book kept for that purpose, at the time of reception, a record, with the date 
of the same, of the name, age, residence, occupation and such other statistics in regard to 
every patient admitted to the Sanatorium as the by-laws may require. 

Sec. 14. The treasurer shall have the custody of all moneys, bonds, notes, mortgages, 
and other securities and obhgations to the Sanatorium. Said moneys shall be disbursed only 
for the uses and purposes of the Sanatorium, and in the manner prescribed by the by-laws 
on itemized vouchers allowed by the board of trustees, and so certified by the president and 
secretary of the board. The treasurer shall keep full and accurate accounts of all receipts 
and payments, in the manner directed in the by-laws, and such other accounts as the board 
of trustees shall prescribe. He shall render statements of accounts of the several books, 
and of the funds and other property in his custody, whenever required so to do by the board 
of trustees. He shall have all accounts and records pertaining to his office fully made to 
the last day of June and present the same to the board of trustees at their annual meeting. 

Sec. 15. There shall be received into said Sanatorium, such persons as shall be proved 
by proper bacteriological or clinical examination to be suffering from tuberculosis. Such 
patients shall be of two classes, namely, first, persons resident of this State who on account 
of their poverty are unable to pay the necessary expenses for residence at said Sanatorium; 
and second, residents of this State who are able to pay such fees as shall be fixed by the board 
of trustees. 

Sec. 16. In case of any person designated in section fifteen under the first class, after 
such persons shall have furnished a certificate of the superintendent of the poor of their county 
or township, approved by the judge of probate of said county, that such person belongs in 
said first class, the board of trustees shall have discretionary power to pay their necessary 
expenses, not less than five dollars nor more than seven dollars per week, and may issue a 
voucher properly itemized and sworn to the Auditor General that such amoimt has been 
expended for the benefit of such person, whereupon the Auditor General shall draw his warrant 
on the State Treasurer therefor, and any such sums are hereby appropriated, and shall be 
paid out of any moneys in the general fund not otherwise appropriated, and the Auditor 
General shall charge all such money to the county of which such person is a resident or to 
which he or she belongs, to be collected quarterly and returned to the general fund in the 
State treasury. 

Sec. 17. Any superintendent of the poor, in any county of this State, may send, or cause 
to be sent, with the approval of the judge of probate of said county, to the Sanatoriimi any 
person who, under the rules of the Sanatorimn, is entitled to admission therein, who is a 
charge upon the county. Before sending any patient to the Sanatorium, under the provisions 
of this act, such superintendent of the poor shall correspond with the superintendent of the 
Sanatorium, and conform to the rules established by the board of trustees, and he shall cause 
the patient to be comfortably clothed, and shall provide the patient with suitable clothing 
while the patient remains at the Sanatorium, and shall defray the necessary traveling expenses 
in going to and returning therefrom, and provide the patient with such articles of necessity 
and convenience as are required by the rules of the Sanatorium. 

Sec. 18. All persons entitled to admission to the Sanatorimn who are not a charge upon 
the county, but who, on account of their poverty, are unable to provide themselves with suit- 
able clothing or other necessary articles, shall receive the same aid from the superintendent of 
the poor of their respective counties while attending the Sanatorium as is provided in this act 
for those who are a county charge. All proper expenses incurred by- the superintendents of 
the poor under this or the preceding section shall be a charge against their respective counties, 
and shall be defrayed out of the poor fund of such coimty. 

Sec. 19. The charges for the support of the patients in said Sanatorium who are able to 
pay the same, or have persons or kindred bound by law to maintain them, shall be paid to 
the medical superintendent by such patients, persons, or kindred, at a rate to be determined 
by the board of trustees of said Sanatorium. 

267 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

Sec. 20. All moneys collected by the medical superintendent shall be passed over to 
the treasurer of the Sanatorium and his receipt taken therefor, such moneys to be disbursed 
by the treasurer under the provisions of section fourteen of this act. 

Sec. 21. The sirni of twenty thousand dollars is hereby appropriated for the fiscal year 
ending Jime thirty, nineteen hundred six, for the purpose of purchasing a site, of erecting, 
constructing and equipping the Sanatorium and buildings herein provided for, and to pay 
the necessary expenses of the members of the board of trustees and for the maintenance of 
the Sanatorium provided for in this act. The Treasurer of the State shall, on the warrant 
of the Auditor General and on the statement of the architect and of the board of trustees, pay 
over to the treasurer of the said Sanatorium the above named sum in such amounts as may 
from time to time in the judgment of the architect and board of trustees be deemed necessary. 

Sec. 22. The sum of ten thousand dollars is hereby appropriated for the fiscal year ending 
June thirty, nineteen hundred seven, to pay the necessary expenses of the members of the 
board of trustees and for the maintenance of the Sanatorium provided for in this act. The 
Treasurer of the State shall, on the warrant of the Auditor General and of the board of trustees, 
pay over to the treasurer of the said Sanatorium the above named sum in such amounts as 
may, from time to time, in the judgment of the board of trustees, be deemed necessary. 

Sec. 23. The Auditor General shall add to and incorporate in the State tax for the 
fiscal year ending June thirty, nineteen hundred five, the sum of twenty thousand dollars, 
and for the fiscal year ending June thirty, nineteen hundred six, the sum of ten thousand 
dollars, which, when collected, shall be credited to the general fund to reimburse the same for 
the money hereby appropriated. 

This Act is ordered to take immediate effect. 

Approved June 16, 1905. 

[No. 254, Laws of 1905.] 

NEW YORK 

AN ACT to amend the county law, in relation to the establishment and maintenance of 
county hospitals for the care of persons suffering from the disease known as tubercu- 
losis. 

[Became a law May 13, igog, with the approval of the Governor. Passed, three-fifths being present.] 
The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows: 

Section i. Chapter sixteen of the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act 
in relation to counties, constituting chapter eleven of the consolidated laws," is hereby 
amended by adding thereto ten new sections after section forty-four thereof, to be known as 
sections forty-five, forty-six, forty-seven, forty-eight, forty-nine, forty-nine-a, forty-nine-b, 
forty-nine-c, forty-nine-d, forty-nine-e, to read as follows: 

Sec. 45. Establishment of county hospital for tuberculosis. — The board of supervisors of 
any county shall have power by a majority vote to estabhsh a county hospital for the care 
and treatment of persons suffering from the disease known as tuberculosis. When the board 
of supervisors of any county shall have voted to establish such hospital, it shall have the follow- 
ing power: 

1. To purchase and lease real property therefor, or acquire such real property, and case- 
ments therein, by condemnation proceedings, in the manner prescribed by the condemnation 
law, in any town, city or village in the county. 

2. To erect all necessary buildings, make all necessary improvements and repairs and 
alter any existing buildings, for the use of said hospital, provided that the plans for such 
erection, alteration or repair shall first be approved by the state commissioner of health. 

3. To cause to be assessed, levied and collected such sums of money as it shall deem 
necessary for suitable lands, buildings and improvements for said hospital, and for the main- 
tenance thereof, and for all other necessary expenditures therefor; and to borrow money for 
the erection of such hospital and for the purchase of a site therefor on the credit of the county, 
and issue county obligations therefor, in such manner as it may do for other county purposes. 

4. To appoint a board of managers for said hospital as hereinafter provided. 

5. To accept and hold in trust for the county, any grant or devise of land, or any gift 
or bequest of money or other personal property or any donation to be applied, principal or 

268 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

income, or both, for the benefit of said hospital, and apply the same in accordance with the 
terms of the gift. 

Sec. 46. Appointment and terms of office of managers. — When the board of supervisors 
shall have determined to establish a hospital for the care and treatment of persons suffering 
from tuberculosis, and shall have acquired a site therefor, and shall have awarded contracts 
for the necessary buildings and improvements thereon, it shall appoint five citizens of the 
county, of whom at least two shall be practicing physicians, v/ho shall constitute a board of 
managers of the said hospital. The term of office of each member of said board shall be five 
years, and the term of one of such managers shall expire annually; the first appointments shall 
be made for the respective terms of five, four, three, two and one years. Appointments of 
successors shall be for the full term of five years, except that appointment of persons to fill 
vacancies occurring by death, resignation or other cause shall be made for the unexpired term. 
Failure of any manager to attend three consecutive meetings of the board shall cause a vacancy 
in his office, unless said absence is excused by formal action of the board of managers. The 
managers shall receive no compensation for their services, but shall be allowed their actual 
and necessary traveling and other expenses, to be audited and paid, in the same manner as 
the other expenses of the hospital, by the board of supervisors. Any manager may at any 
time be removed from office by the board of supervisors of the county, for cause after an 
opportunity to be heard. 

Sec. 47. General powers and duties of managers. — The board of managers: 

1. Shall elect from among its members, a president and one or more vice-presidents. 
It shall appoint a superintendent of the hospital who shall be also the treasurer and secretary 
of the board and shall hold office at the pleasure of said board. Said superintendent shall not 
be a member of the board of managers, and shall be a graduate of an incorporated medical 
college, with an experience of at least three years in the actual practice of his profession. 

2. Shall fix the salaries of the superintendent and all other officers and employees within 
the limits of the appropriation made therefor by the board of supervisors, and such salaries 
shall be compensation in full for all services rendered. The board of managers shall determine 
the amount of time required to be spent at the hospital by said superintendent in the discharge 
of his duties. 

3. Shall have the general superintendence, management and control of the said hospital, 
of the grounds, buildings, officers and employees thereof; of the inmates therein, and of all 
matters relating to the government, disciphne, contracts, and fiscal concerns thereof; and 
make such rules and regulations as may seem to them necessary for carrying out the pin-poses 
of such hospital. 

4. Shall maintain an effective inspection of said hospital, and keep itself informed of the 
affairs and management thereof; shall meet at the hospital at least once in every month, and 
at such other times as may be prescribed in the by-laws; and shall hold its annual meeting 
at least three weeks prior to the meeting of the board of supervisors at which appropriations 
for the ensuing year are to be considered. 

5. Shall keep in a book provided for that purpose, a proper record of its proceedings 
which shall be open at all times to the inspection of its members, to the members of the 
board of supervisors of the county, and to duly authorized representatives of the state board 
of charities. 

6 . Shall certify all bills and accounts including salaries and wages and transmit them to 
the board of supervisors of the county, who shall provide for their pajmient in the same 
manner as other charges against the county are paid. 

7. Shall make to the board of supervisors of the county annually, at such time as said 
supervisors shall direct, a detailed report of the operations of the hospital during the year, 
the number of patients received, the' methods and results of their treatment, together with 
suitable recommendations and such other matter as maj^ be required of them, and full and 
detailed estimates of the appropriations required during the ensuing year for all purposes 
including maintenance, the erection ot buildings, repairs, renewals, extensions, unprovements, 
betterments or other necessary purposes. 

Sec. 48. General powers and duties of superintendent. — The superintendent shall be the 
chief executive officer of the hospital and subject to the by-laws, rules and regulations thereof, 
and to the powers of the board of managers: 

I. Shall equip the hospital with all necessary furniture, appliances, fixtures and other 

269 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

needed facilities for the care and treatment of patients and for the use of ofiicers and employees 
thereof and shall in counties where there is no purchasing agent purchase all necessary supplies. 

2. Shall have general supervision and control of the records, accounts, and buildings of 
the hospital and all internal ailairs, and maintain discipline therein, and enforce compliance 
with, and obedience to all rules, bj^-laws and regulations adopted by the board of managers 
for the government,- discipline and management of said hospital, and the employees and in- 
mates thereof. He shall make such further rules, regulations and orders as he may deem 
necessary, not inconsistent with law, or with the rules, regulations and directions of the board 
of managers. 

3. Shall appoint such resident officers and such employees as he may think proper and 
necessary for the efficient performance of the business of the hospital, and prescribe their 
duties; and for cause stated in writing, after an opportunity to be heard, discharge any such 
officer or employee at his discretion. 

4. Shall cause proper accounts and records of the business and operations of the hospital 
to be kept regularly from day to day, in books and on records provided for that purpose; 
and see that such accounts and records are correctly made up for the annual report to the 
board of supervisors, as required by subdivision seven of section forty-seven of this chapter, 
and present the same to the board of managers, who shall incorporate them in their report to 
the said supervisors. 

5. Shall receive into the hospital, under the general direction of the board of managers, 
in the order of application, any person found to be suffering from tuberculosis in any form 
who has been an actual resident and inhabitant of the county for a period of at least one year 
prior to his application for admission to said hospital; and shall also receive persons from 
other counties as hereinafter provided. Said superintendent shall cause to be kept proper 
accounts and records of the admission of all patients, their name, age, sex, color, marital 
condition, residence, occupation and place of last employment. 

6. shall cause a careful examination to be made of the physical condition of all persons 
admitted to the hospital and provide for the treatment of each such patient according to his 
need; and shall cause a record to be kept of the condition of each patient when admitted, 
and from time to time thereafter. 

7. Shall discharge from said hospital any patient who shall wilfully or habitually violate 
the rules thereof; or who is found not to have tuberculosis; or who is found to have recovered 
therefrom; or who for any other reason is no longer a suitable patient for treatment therein; 
and shall make a full report thereof at the next meeting of the board of managers. 

8. Shall collect and receive all moneys due the hospital, keep an accurate account of the 
same, report the same at the monthly meeting of the board of managers, and transmit the 
same to the treasurer of the county within ten days after such meeting. 

9. Shall before entering upon the discharge of his duties, give a bond in such sum as the 
board of managers may determine, to secure the faithful performance of such duties. 

Sec. 49. Admission of patients from county in which hospital is situated. — Any resident 
of the county in which the hospital is situated desiring treatment in such hospital, may applj'' 
in person to the superintendent or to any reputable physician for examination, and such physi- 
cian, if he find that said person is suffering from tuberculosis in an}' form, may apply to 
the superintendent of the hospital for his admission. Blank forms for such applications shall 
be provided by the hospital, and shall be forwarded by the superintendent thereof gratuitously 
to any reputable physician in the county, upon request. So far as practicable, applications 
for admission to the hospital shall be made upon such forms. The superintendent of the 
hospital, upon the receipt of such application, if it appears therefrom that the patient is 
suffering from tuberculosis, and if there be a vacancy in the said hospital, shall notify the person 
named in such application to appear in person at the hospital. If, upon personal examination 
of such patient, or of any patient applying in person for admission, the superintendent is 
satisfied that such person is suffering from tuberculosis, he shall admit him to the hospital 
as a patient. All such applications shall state whether, in the judgment of the physician, 
the person is able to pay in whole or in part for his care and treatment while at the hospital; 
and every application shall be filed and recorded in a book kept for that purpose in the order 
of their receipt. When said hospital is completed and ready for the treatment of patients, 
or whenever thereafter there are vacancies therein, admissions to said hospital shall be made 
in the order in which the names of applicants shall appear upon the application book to be 
kept as above provided, in so far as such applicants are certified to by the superintendent 

270 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

to be suffering from tuberculosis. No discrimination shall be made in the accommodation, 
care or treatment of any patient because of the fact that the patient or his relatives contribute 
to the cost of his maintenance in whole or in part, and no patient shall be permitted to pay 
for his maintenance in such hospital a greater sum than the average per capita cost of main- 
tenance therein, including a reasonable allowance for the interest on the cost of the hospital; 
and no ofi&cer or employee of such hospital shall accept from any patient thereof any fee, 
pajonent or gratuity whatsoever for his services. 

Sec. 49-a. Maintenance of patients in the county in which hospital is situated. — Wherever 
a patient has been admitted to said hospital from the county in which the hospital is situated, 
the superintendent shall cause such inquiry to be made as he may deem necessary, as to his 
circiunstances, and of the relatives of such patient legally liable for his support. If he find 
that such patient, or said relatives are able to pay for his care and treatment in whole or in 
part, an order shall be made directing such patient, or said relatives to pay to the treasurer 
of such hospital for the support of such patient a specified sum per week, in proportion to their 
financial abihty, but such sum shall not exceed the actual per capita cost of maintenance. 
The superintendent shall have the same power and authority to collect such sum from the 
estate of the patient, or his relatives legally liable for his support, as is possessed by an over- 
seer of the poor in like circumstances. If the superintendent find that such patient, or said 
relatives are not able to pay, either in whole or in part, for his care and treatment in such 
hospital, the same shall become a charge upon the county. 

Sec. 49-b. Admission of patients from counties not having a hospital. — In any county not 
having a county hospital for the care and treatment of persons siiffering from tuberculosis, 
a county superintendent of the poor, upon the receipt of the application and certificate here- 
inafter provided for, may apply to the superintendent of any such hospital established by 
any other county, for the admission of such patient. Any person residing in a county in 
which there is no such hospital, who desires to receive treatment in such a hospital, may 
apply therefor in writing to the superintendent of the poor of the county in which he resides 
on a blank to be provided by said superintendent for that purpose, submitting with such 
application a written certificate signed by a reputable physician on a blank to be provided 
by the superintendent of the poor for such purpose, stating that such physician has, within 
the ten days then next preceding, examined such person, and that, in his judgment, such person 
is suffering from tuberculosis. The superintendent of the poor, on receipt of such apphcation 
and certificate, shall forward the same to the superintendent of any hospital for the care and 
treatment of tuberculosis. If such patient be accepted by such hospital, the superintendent 
of the poor shall provide for his transportation thereto, and for his maintenance therein at a 
rate to be fixed as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 49-c. Maintenance of patients from counties not having a hospital. — Whenever the 
superintendent of such a county hospital, shall receive from a superintendent of the poor of 
any other county an application for the admission of a patient, if it appear from such applica- 
tion that the person therein referred to is suffering from tuberculosis, the superintendent shall 
notify said person to appear in person at the hospital, provided there be a vacancy in such 
hospital and there be no pending apphcation from a patient residing in the county in which 
the hospital is located. If, upon personal examination of the patient, the superintendent is 
satisfied that such patient is suffering from tuberculosis, he shall admit him to the hospital. 
Every patient so admitted shall be a charge against the county sending such patient, at a 
rate to be fixed by the board of managers, which shall not exceed the per capita cost of main- 
tenance therein, including a reasonable allowance for interest on the costs of the hospital; 
and the bill therefor shall, when verified by the superintendent of the poor of the county from 
which said patient was sent, be audited and paid by the board of supervisors of the said county. 
The said superintendent of the poor shall cause an investigation to be made into the circiun- 
stances of such patient, and of his relatives legally liable for his support, and shall have the 
same authority as an overseer of the poor in like circumstances to collect therefrom, in whole 
or in part, according to their financial ability, the cost of the maintenance of such person in 
said hospital. 

Sec. 49-d. Visitation and inspection. — The resident ofiicer of the hospital shall ad mi t 
the managers into every part of the hospital and the premises and give them access on demand 
to all books, papers, accounts and records pertaining to the hospital and shall furnish copies, 
abstracts and reports whenever required by them. All hospitals established or maintained 

271 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

under the provisions of sections forty-five to fortj'^-nine-e, inclusive, of this chapter, shall be 
subject to inspection by any duly authorized representative of the state board of charities, 
of the state department of health, of the state charities aid association and of the board of 
"supervisors of the county; and the resident officers shall admit such representatives into every 
part of the hospital and its buildings, and give them access on demand to all records, reports, 
books, papers and accounts pertaining to the hospital. 

Sec. 4Q-e. Hospitals at ahuslioitses. — Wherever a hospital for the care and treatment of 
persons suffering from tuberculosis e.xists in connection with, or on the grounds of a county 
almshouse, the board of supervisors may, after sections forty-five to forty-nine-e of this chapter 
take effect, appoint a board of managers for such hospital, and such hospital, and its board 
of managers, shall thereafter be subject to all the provisions of this act, in like manner as if 
it had been originally established hereunder. Any hospital which may hereafter be established 
by any board of supervisors shall in like manner be subject to all the provisions of said section. 

Sec. 2. This act shall take eff'ect immediately. 
[Chapter 341, Laws of igog.] 

OHIO 

AN ACT to provide for county hospitals for the care and treatment of inmates of county 
infirmaries and other residents of the county suffering from tuberculosis. 

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio: 

Section i. That on and after January i, 191 1, it shall be unlawful to keep any person 
suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis, commonly known as consumption, in any county 
infirmary except in separate buildings to be provided and used for that purpose only. 

Sec. 2. The board of county commissioners are hereby authorized and may construct 
in each county a suitable building or buildings, which shall be separate and apart from the 
infirmarj"- buildings, to be known as the county hospital for tuberculosis; and they shall also 
jirovide for the proper furnishing and equipment of said hospital; provided that there is 
not already established a hospital in the county for treatment and maintenance of tuberculosis 
patients; and whenever in any county funds are not available to carry out the provisions 
of this act, the county commissioners shall levy for that purpose, and set aside the sum neces- 
sary, which shall not be used for any other purpose, and the commissioners of the county 
may issue and sell the bonds of said county in anticipation of said levy, and the provisions of 
Section 2825 of the Revised Statutes, relating to the construction of public buildings and 
bridges, as amended May 9, 1908, shall not applj^ to county hospitals for tuberculosis provided 
for herein. The infirmary directors shall provide for the treatment, care and maintenance 
of patients received at said coimty hospital, and for necessary nurses and attendants, and all 
expenses so incurred shall be audited and paid as are other expenditures for county infirmary 
purposes. An accurate account shall be kept of all moneys received from patients or other 
sources, which shall be applied toward the payment of maintaining said county hospital; 
and the infirmary directors shall have authority to receive for the use of such hospital gifts, 
legacies, demises or conveyances of property, real or personal, that may be made, given or 
granted to for the use of said county hospital, or in its name, or in the name of said directors. 

Sec. 3. The commissioners and infirmary directors of any county, in lieu of providing 
for the erection of a county hospital for tuberculosis, may contract with the infirmary directors 
of any other county or with the board of public service of any municipality where such hospital 
has been constructed for the care and treatment of the inmates of such infirmary or other 
residents of the county who are suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis, and the infirmary 
directors of the county in which such patients reside shall pay into the poor fund of the county 
or into the proper fund of the city receiving such patients the actual cost incurred in their 
care and treatment and other necessaries; and shall also pay for their transportation. The 
probate judge of any county in which such hospital has not been provided may, upon a proper 
presentation of the facts and the recommendation of the state board of health, order any 
inmate of the infirmary who is suffering from pulmonaiy tuberculosis removed to the county 
hospital for tuberculosis of some other county, and there confiined, provided that such removal 
shall not be made without the consent of such inmate if a suitable place outside of the infirmary 
is provided for his or her care and treatment. 

272 



LEGISLATION SANATORIUM AND COUNTY HOSPITAL LAWS 

Sec. 4. The county hospital for tuberculosis shall be devoted to the care and treatment 
of those admitted to the county infirmary who are afflicted with pulmonary tuberculosis, 
and of other residents of the county who may be suffering from said disease and who are in 
need of proper care and treatment; and the board of infirmary directors shall investigate 
all appUcants for admission to the county hospital for tuberculosis who are not inmates of 
the county infirmary and require satisfactory proof that they are in need of proper care, 
and have pulmonary tuberculosis; provided, that the infirmary directors may require from 
any such applicant admitted a payment of not to exceed $3.00 a week, or such less sum as 
they may determine, for hospital care and treatment. The physician to the county infirmary 
shall have the medical care of patients in the county hospital; provided, that any patient 
not an inmate of the county infirmary shall have the privilege of calling other medical at- 
tendance in consultation with the regular infirmary physician, but not at the expense of the 
county. 

Sec. 5. The state board of health shall have general supervision of all county hospitals 
for tuberculosis, and shall prescribe, and is hereby authorized to enforce, such rules and regu- 
lations for their government, and for the protection from infection of other inmates of the 
county infirmary and of nurses and attendants in the county hospital for tuberculosis, and 
others, as they may deem necessary; and it shall be the duty of all persons in charge of or 
employed at such hospitals, or residents thereof, to faithfully obey and comply with any and 
all such rules and regulations; and said board, acting with the board of state charities, shall 
approve the location and plans for all county hospitals for tuberculosis. 

Sec. 6. In accordance with the purposes, provisions, and regulations of the foregoing 
sections, except as herein provided, the commissioners of any two or more counties, not to 
exceed five, may form themselves into a joint board for the purpose of establishing and main- 
taining a district hospital for the care and treatment of persons suffering from tuberculosis, and 
may provide the necessary funds for the purchase of a site and the erection of the necessary 
buildings thereon, in the manner and for the purposes hereinbefore set forth; provided that 
said joint board of county commissioners in the selection and acquirement of a site for said 
hospital shall have the same powers for the appropriation of lands as are conferred upon boards 
of trustees of benevolent institutions of the state by Section 623 of the Revised Statutes; 
and they are hereby authorized to receive and hold in trust for the use and benefit of any such 
institution, any grant or devise of land, and any donation or bequest of money or other personal 
property that may be made for the establishment or support thereof. 

Sec. 7. Immediately upon the organization of the joint board, or as soon thereafter as 
possible, they shall appoint a board of trustees to consist of one member from each county 
represented. Said board of trustees shall hold their offices as follows: One for one year, one 
for two years, and, where three counties are represented, one for three years; and, where 
four counties are represented, one for four years, and, where five counties are represented, 
one for five years; and annually after said board is so constituted the joint board of com- 
missioners shall appoint one trustee for a term of as many years as there are counties repre- 
sented, and until his successor is appointed and qualified. Any vacancy shall be filled by 
an appointment in like manner for the unexpired term of the original appointment. The 
joint board of commissioners shall have power to remove any trustee for good and sufficient 
cause after a hearing upon written charges. 

Sec. 8. The board of trustees herein provided for shall prepare plans and specifications, 
subject to the provisions of this act, and proceed to erect the necessary buildings, and furnish 
the same, for a district hospital for tuberculosis. They shall appoint some suitable person 
who shall act as medical superintendent of such hospital and, upon the recommendation of 
the superintendent such nurses and other employes as may be necessary for the proper conduct 
of such hospital, and the trustees shall fix the compensation of said medical superintendent 
and of the other employes. The superintendent shall have entire charge and control of said 
hospital, subject to such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the board of trustees. 
The trustees shall serve without compensation, but their necessary expenses when engaged 
in services of the board shall be paid. 

Sec. 9. Such board of trustees shall meet monthly, and until said hospital is erected and 

equipped, at such other times as they may deem necessary; and said trustees shall on the first 

Monday in April of each year, file with the joint board of county commissioners a report of 

their proceedings with reference to said district hospital, and a statement of all receipts and 

18 273 



LEGISLATION ANTI-SPITTING AND SCHOOL INSTRUCTION LAWS 

expenditures during the year; and shall at such time certify the amount necessary to maintain 
and improve said hospital for the ensuing year. (Passed March 12, 1909.) 

Sec. 10. The first cost of the hospital, and the cost of all betterments and additions 
thereto, shall be paid by the counties comprising the district, in proportion to the taxable 
property of each county, as shown by their respective duplicates; a statement shall be pre- 
pared quarterly showing the per capita daily cost for the current expense of maintaining said 
hospital, including the cost of the ordinarj' repairs, and each count}' comprised in the district 
shall pay its share of such cost as determined by the number of days the total number of 
patients from such county have spent in such hospital during the quarter, but the sum paid 
by patients from such county for their treatment therein shall be deducted from this amount. 
The boards of commissioners of counties jointly maintaining a district hospital for tuberculosis 
shall make annual assessments of taxes suiEcient to support and defray all necessary expenses 
of such hospital. 

[Approved April 3, 190S; amended as above March 12, 1909.] 



III. ANTI-SPITTING LAWS 

VIRGINIA 

AN ACT prohibiting expectorating or spitting in public places, buildings, theaters, steam- 
boats, railways, and street cars, and other public conveyances, and requiring a sufficient 
number of spittoons or cuspidors to be provided in smoking compartments and smoking 
cars when so requested, and also requiring the posting of copies of this act. 

Be it resolved by the General Assembly of Virginia: 

Section i. That no person shall spit, expectorate, or deposit any sputum, sahva, mucus, 
or any form of sahva or sputum upon the floor, stairway, or upon any part of any theater, 
public hall, or building, or upon the floor or any part of any railroad car or street car or steam- 
boat, or upon the floor or any part of any car of interurban or suburban railway, or of any other 
public conveyance in the State of Virginia, or upon any sidewalk abutting on any pubhc street, 
alley or lane of any pubhc town or city in the State of Virginia; and it is hereby made the 
duty of the owner or lessee of every theater, public hall, or building in the State of Virginia 
to provide every such theater, public hall, or building with a sufficient number of spittoons 
or cuspidors. 

Sec. 2. It is further provided, That every railroad or steamboat company shall provide 
in each smoking compartment or smoking car, when so requested, as many cuspidors or spittoons 
as may be necessary for the convenience of passengers. 

Sec. 3. Any person violating any provision of this law shall, upon conviction, be fined 
in a sum not less than one nor more than five dollars, and in default of payment, be imprisoned 
in the city or county jail for not more than five days. 

Sec. 4. It is further provided that printed copies of this act shall be posted conspicuously 
in all public places, buildings, theaters, railway, and street cars. 

[Approved March 17, 1906.] 



IV. SCHOOL INSTRUCTION LAWS 

The following laws and sections of laws relate to compulsory instruction on tuberculosis 
and kindred;subjects in the public schools. While the Michigan law does not specify tuber- 
culosis, this disease is given special prominence in the list of "dangerous communicable 
diseases" concerning which instruction is required, 

274 



LEGISLATION MUNICIPAL ORDINANCES 



MICHIGAN 

AN ACT to provide for teaching in the public schools the modes by which the dangerous 

communicable diseases are spread and the best methods for the restriction and prevention 

of such diseases. 
The People of the Slate of Michigan enact: 

Section i. There shall be taught in every year in every public school in Michigan the 
principal modes by which each of the dangerous communicable diseases are spread and the 
best methods for the restriction and prevention of each such disease. Such instruction shall 
be given by the aid of text books on physiology, supplemented by oral and black-board 
instruction. From and after July first, nineteen hundred ten, no text book on physiology 
shall be adopted for use in the public schools of this State, unless it shall give at least one- 
eighth of its space to the causes and prevention of dangerous communicable diseases. Text 
books used in giving the foregoing instruction shall, before being adopted for use in the public 
schools, have that portion given to the instruction in communicable diseases approved by the 
state board of health. 

[Approved May i6, 1895, and amended March, 1909.] 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Section one of Chapter forty-two, Revised Laws of 1908: 

Every city and town shall maintain, for at least thirty-two weeks in each year, a sufficient 
number of schools for the instruction of all the children who may legally attend a public school 
therein, except that in towns whose assessed valuation is less than two hundred thousand 
dollars, the required period may, with the consent of the board of education, be reduced to 
twenty-eight weeks. Such schools shall be taught by teachers of competent ability and good 
morals, and shall give instruction in orthography, reading, writing, the English language and 
grammar, geography, arithmetic, drawing, the history of the United States, physiology and 
hygiene, and good behavior. In each of the subjects of physiology and_ hygiene, special 
instruction as to the effects of alcoholic drinks and of stimulants and narcotics on the human 
system, and as to tuberculosis and its prevention, shall be taught as a regular branch of study 
to all pupils in all schools which are supported wholly or partly by public money, except 
schools which are maintained solely for instruction in particular branches. Bookkeeping, 
algebra, geometry, one or more foreign languages, the elements of the natural sciences, kinder- 
garten training, manual training, agriculture, sewing, cooking, vocal music, physical training, 
civil government, ethics and such other subjects as the school committee consider expedient 
may be taught in the public schools. 

MISSOURI 

Section 10,806, chapter 106, article 2 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri, 1909: 
Sec. 65. Instruction in physiology and hygiene. — Physiology and hygiene, including their 
several branches, with special instruction as to tuberculosis, its nature, causes and prevention, 
and the effect of alcoholic drinks, narcotics and stimulants on the human system, shall consti- 
tute a part of the course of instruction, and be taught in all schools supported wholly or in 
part by public money or under state control. 



V. MUNICIPAL ORDINANCES 

The full text of the notification and registration ordinances of San Francisco, Minneapolis 
and Peoria, lU., is given, and also two anti-spitting ordinances from Wilmington, Del., and 
Indianapolis. Section 9 of the San Francisco ordinance provides for the compulsory removal 

27s 



LEGISLATION MUNICIPAL ORDINANCES 

of tuberculous patients under certain conditions. These ordinances are given simply as types 
of the various forms of ordinances in successful operation. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

BILL NO. III2. ORDINANCE NO. 975. (New Series.) Providing methods for the 

prevention of the spread of tuberculosis. 
Be U ordained by the People of the City and County of San Francisco as folloivs: 

Section i. Tuberculosis is hereby declared to be a communicable disease, dangerous 
to the public health. 

It shall be the duty of evcrj'- physician practicing in the City and County of San Francisco, 
and of every person in charge of any hospital, dispensary or other private or public institution 
in said City and County, to report in WTiting to the Board of Health the name, age, sex. 
color, occupation, address and place where last employed, of every person having tuberculosis 
which comes under his care or observation. Said reports shall be made in writing on a form 
furnished as hereinafter provided, and shall be forwarded to said Department of Public 
Health within twenty-four hours after knowledge of the case comes to said physician or person. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the dutj-^ of the Health Officer when so requested by any physician 
or by authorities of any hospital or dispensary to make or cause to be made a microscopical 
examination of the sputum sent him as that of a person having symptoms of tuberculosis, 
accompanied by a blank giving name, age, sex, color, occupation, place where last employed, 
if known, and address of the person whose sputum it is. It shall be the duty of the Health 
Officer to promptly make a report of the results of such examinations free of charge to the 
physician or person upon whose application the same is made. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the Health Officer to cause all reports and all results of 
examinations showing the presence of the bacilli of tuberculosis made in accordance with pro- 
visions of Sections i and 2 respectively of this Ordinance to be recorded in a register of 
which he shall be the custodian. Such register shall not be open to inspection by any person 
other than the health authorities of the State and of the said City and County, and said health 
authorities shall not permit any such report or record to be divulged so as to disclose the 
identity of the person to whom it relates, except as may be necessary to carry into effect the 
provisions of this ordinance. 

Sec. 4. In case of vacation of any apartment or premises by the death or removal there- 
from of a person having tuberculosis, it shall be the duty of the attending physician, or if there 
be no such physician, or if such physician be absent, of the owner, lessee, occupant or other 
person having charge of said apartment or premises, to notify the Department of Pu-blic 
Plealth of said death or removal within twenty-four hours thereafter; and such apartment or 
premises so vacated shall not be occupied until duly disinfected, cleansed, or renovated, as 
hereinafter provided. Further, it shall be unlawful for any person suffering from tuberculosis 
to change his or her residence or to be removed therefrom until the Department of Public 
Health has been notified so that the vacated apartment or premises may be disinfected, cleansed, 
or renovated. 

Sec. 5. When notified of the vacation of any apartment or premises as provided in 
Section 4 thereof, the Health Officer or one of his deputies shall thereafter visit said apartment 
or premises and shall order and direct that except for purposes of cleaning or disinfection no 
infected article shall be removed therefrom until properly and suitably cleansed or disinfected, 
and said Health Officer or deputy shall determine the manner in which said apartment or 
premises shall be disinfected, cleansed or renovated in order that they may be rendered safe 
and suitable for occupancy. After the health authorities determine that disinfection is suffi- 
cient to render them safe and suitable for occupancy, said apartment or premises, together 
with all infected articles therein, shall be immediately disinfected by the Department of 
Public Health; or if the owner prefers, by the owner at his expense to the satisfaction of the 
Health Officer. Should the Health Ofl&cer determine that such apartment or premises are in 
need of thorough cleansing or renovating, a notice to this effect shall be served upon the owner 
or agent of said premises, and said owner or agent shall proceed to the cleansing or renovating 
of said apartment or premises in accordance with the instructions of the Health Officer, and 
such cleansing and renovating shall be done at the expense of said owner or agent. Such 

276 



LEGISLATION MUNICIPAL ORDINANCES 

articles that cannot be disinfected or renovated to the satisfaction of the Health OfiBcer 
shall be destroyed. 

Sec. 6. In case the orders or directions of the Health OfiBcer requiring the disinfecting, 
cleansing or renovating of any apartment or premises or any article therein as hereinbefore 
provided shall not be complied with within forty-eight hours after said orders or directions 
shall be given, the Health Officer may cause a placard, in words and form substantially as 
follows, to be placed on the door of the infected apartment or premises: 

" Tuberculosis is a communicable disease. These apartments have been occupied by a con- 
sumptive and may be infected. They must not be occupied until the order of the Health Officer 
directing the disinfection or renovation has been complied with. This notice must not be re- 
moved under the penalty of the law except by the Health Offi^cer or other duly authorized official.^' 

Sec. 7. Any person having tuberculosis who shall dispose of his sputum, saliva or other 
bodily secretion or excretion so as to cause offense or danger to any person or persons occupying 
the same room or apartment, house or part of house, shall on complaint of any person subject 
to such offense or danger, be deemed guilty of a nuisance; and any person subject to such a 
nuisance may make complaint in writing to the Health Of&cer, and it shall be the duty of the 
Health Officer receiving such complaint to investigate and if it appears that the nuisance 
complained of is such as to cause offense or danger to any person occupying the same room, 
apartment, house or part of a house, he shall serve a notice on the person so complained of 
reciting the alleged cause of offense or danger and requiring him to dispose of his sputum, 
saliva or other bodily secretion or excretion in such a manner as to remove all reasonable 
cause of offense or danger. 

Sec. 8. It shall be the duty of a physician attending a patient for tuberculosis to take all 
proper precautions and to give proper instructions to provide for the safety of all individuals 
occupying the same house or apartment. 

Sec. 9. In cases of tuberculosis proven by sputum analj'sis, or where the attending 
physician or inspector is willing to vouch for the diagnosis, when the necessary precautions 
cannot or will not be observed, or when others, especially children, are exposed to infection, a 
patient may be removed by force if necessary, even if consent of patient or family be not 
obtained, to such place as may be designated by the Department of Public Health. 

Sec. 10. It shall be the duty of the Health Officer to transmit to a physician reporting a 
case of tuberculosis as provided in Section i of this Ordinance a printed statement and report 
naming such procedure and precautions as are necessary or desirable to be taken on the prem- 
ises of a tubercular patient. Upon receipt of such statement or report, the physician shall 
either carry into effect all such procedures and precautions as are therein prescribed, and shall 
thereupon sign and date the same, and return to the Health Officer without delay; or if such 
attending physician be unwilling or unable to carry into effect the procedure and precautions 
so specified, he shall so state on this report, and immediately return the same to the Health 
Officer and the duties therein prescribed shall thereupon devolve upon said Health Officer. 
Upon the receipt of this statement and report, the Health Officer shall examine the same and 
satisfy himself that the attending physician has taken all necessary and desirable precautions 
to insure the safety of all persons living in the apartment or premises occupied by the person 
having tuberculosis. If the precautions taken or instructions given by the attending physician 
are, in the opinion of the Health Officer, not such as will remove all reasonable danger or 
probabihty of danger to the persons occupying the same house or apartment or premises, the 
Health Officer shall return to the attending physician the report with a letter specifying the 
additional precautions or instructions which the Health Officer shall require him to make or 
give; and the said attending physician shall immediately take the additional precautions and 
give the additional instructions specified and shall record and return the same on the original 
report to the Health Officer. It shall be the duty of the Health Officer to transmit to every 
person reporting any case of tuberculosis, or if there be no attending physician, to the person 
reported as suffering from this disease, a circular of information which shall inform the con- 
sumptive of the precautions necessary to avoid transmitting the disease to others. 

Sec. II. It shall be unlawful for any physician or person practicing as a physician to 
report knowingly as affected with tuberculosis any person who is not so affected or vsilfuUy 
make any false statement concerning the name, sex, color, occupation, place where last 

277 



LEGISLATION MUNICIPAL ORDINANCES 

employed, if known, or address of any person reported as affected with tuberculosis, or certify 
falsely as to any of the precautions taken to prevent the spread of infection. 

Sec. 12. No instructor, teacher, pupil or child affected with pulmonary tuberculosis shall 
be permitted to attend school by any superintendent, principal or teacher of any public, pri- 
vate or parochial school, except by written permission of the Health Officer. 

Sec. 13. Upon the recovery of any person having tuberculosis, it shall be the duty of the 
attending physician to make a report of this fact to the Health Officer, who shall record the 
same in the records of his office and shall relieve said person of further liability to any require- 
ments imposed by this act. 

Sec. 14. Any person violating any of the provisions of this Ordinance shall be guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine of not more than five 
hundred dollars ($500), or shall be imprisoned in the County Jail for a period not exceeding 
six (6) months, or by both such fine and imprisonment. 

Sec. 15. This Ordinance shall take effect immediately. 
[Passed December 6, 1909.] 

MINNEAPOLIS 

AN ORDINANCE relating to the preservation of health and the prevention and suppression 

of disease in the city of Miimeapolis. 
The City Council of the City of Minneapolis do ordain as follows: 

Section i. Tuberculosis is hereby declared to be an infectious and communicable disease 
dangerous to the pubhc health. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of every physician in the city to report to the Commissioner 
of liealth of this city in writing the name, age, sex, occupation and address of every person 
having tuberculosis who is now or shall hereafter be under the care of such physician and every 
such physician shall make such report upon each case of tuberculosis within one week from 
the time the same shall come to the knowledge or under the observation of such physician. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the commissioners or managers or the principal, superin- 
tendent or physician in charge of every pubhc or private institution, dispensary or hospital 
in the City of Minneapolis to report to the Commissioner of Health of said city in writing the 
name, age, sex, occupation and last previous address of every person infected with tuberculosis 
who is now imder their care, and to make such report as to every person infected with tuber- 
culosis who shall hereafter come under their care or observation and within one week after 
any such person shall come under their care or observation. 

Sec. 4. In case of the vacation of any apartments or premises by death from tuberculosis 
or by the removal therefrom of the person or persons infected with tuberculosis, it shall be 
the duty of the person in charge, or of the physician in charge to notify the Commissioner of 
Health of such removal and within twenty-four hours thereafter, and such apartments and 
premises so affected shaU not again be occupied until duly renovated and disinfected, as 
hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 5. In case of the vacation of any premises or apartments as mentioned in Section 4 
hereof, the Commissioner of Health or one of his health officers shall immediately visit said 
premises and shall order and direct that said apartments or premises and all infected articles 
therein be properly and suitably disinfected. 

In case there shall be no remaining occupants in such premises or apartments and the 
same shall be vacant, the Commissioner of Health shall cause a notice in writing to be served 
upon the owner, or the agent of the owner of such premises or apartments, directing the reno- 
vation or disinfection of such premises or apartments under the direction and in conformity 
with the regulations of the local department of health. 

Sec. 6. In case any orders or directions of the Commissioner of Health requiring the disin- 
fection of any articles, premises or apartments, as hereinbefore provided, shall not be complied 
with within thirty-six hours after such orders or directions shall be given, then it shall be the 
duty of the Commissioner of Health to cause a placard, in words and figures as follows, to be 
placed upon the door of the infected apartments or premises, to wit: 

278 



LEGISLATION MUNICIPAL ORDINANCES 

NOTICE 

Tuberculosis is a communicable disease. These apartments have been occupied by a con- 
sumptive and may have become infected. They must not be occupied until the order of the Health 
Commissioner directing their renovation and disinfection has been complied with. 

This notice must not be removed, defaced^ torn down or destroyed, under penalty of law, except 
by the Commissioner of Health or an authorized officer. 

Sec. 7. In all cases where a nuisance shall be found in any building or upon any grounds 
or premises within the City of Minneapolis and such nuisance is not abated within thirty-six 
hours after a written notice from the Commissioner of Health to the owner or agent of such 
building or premises to abate such nuisance, it shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Health, 
when in his judgment a nuisance shall be such as to render the occupancy of such building or 
premises dangerous or xmhealthy, to place upon such building or premises a placard warning 
the public that such building or premises are unhealthy and should not be occupied until 
placed in a sanitary condition. 

Sec. 8. Any person who shall violate any provision of this ordinance, or who, without 
written authority from the Commissioner of Health shall remove, tear down, deface or destroy, 
or induce or cause another to remove, tear down, deface or destroy any placard placed upon 
any grounds, premises or apartments as hereinbefore provided, shall, upon conviction thereof 
before the municipal court, be pimished by a fine of not less than five dollars ($5.00), nor more 
than one hxmdred dollars ($100), or by imprisonment for not less than five (5) days nor more 
than ninety (90) days. 

Sec. 9. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication. 

[Passed August 26, 1905.] 

PEORIA 

AN ORDINANCE to prevent the spread of tuberculosis. 

Be it ordained by the Common Council of the City of Peoria, Illinois, as follows: 

Section i. That tuberculosis is hereby declared to be an infectious and commimicable 
disease, dangerous to public health. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of every physician in the city to report to the Commissioner 
of Health of this city, in writing, the name, age, sex, occupation and address of every person 
having tuberculosis, who is now under the care of such physician, and such physician shall 
likewise hereafter report upon each case of tuberculosis that shall come under the observation 
of such physician for the first time, within one week of such time. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the Commissioners or Managers, or the Principal, Superin- 
tendent or Physician, in charge of every public or private institution, dispensary or hospital, 
in the City of Peoria, to report to the Commissioner of Health of said city, in writing, the name, 
age, sex, occupation and last previous address of every person infected with tuberculosis, who 
is now in their care, or who shall hereafter come under their observation for the first time, 
within one week of such time. 

Sec. 4. In case of the vacation of any apartments or premises by death from tuberculosis, 
or by the removal therefrom of a person or persons infected with tuberculosis, it shall be the 
duty of the person in charge, or of the physician in charge, to notify the Commissioner of 
Health aforesaid, of such removal, within twenty-foiu: hours thereafter, and such apartments 
or premises so vacated shall not again be occupied until duly renovated and disinfected as 
hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 5. In case of the vacation of any premises or apartments as set out in Section four 
(4) hereof, the Commissioner of Health or one of his health ofl&cers shall immediately visit 
said premises and shall order and direct that such premises or apartments and all infected 
articles therein be properly and suitably disinfected. 

In case there shall be no remaining occupants in such premises or apartments and same 
shall be vacant, then the Commissioner of Health shall cause a notice in writing to be served 
upon the owner, or the agent of the owner of such premises or apartments, ordering the 
renovation and disinfection of such premises or apartments, under the direction and in con- 
formity with the regulations of the local department of health. 

279 



LEGISLATION MUNICIPAL ORDINANCES 

Sec. 6. In case any orders or directions of the Commissioner of Health requiring the dis- 
infection of any articles, premises or apartments, as hereinbefore pro\dded, shall not be 
complied with within thirty-six (36) hours after such orders or directions shall be given, then 
it shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Health to cause a placard, in words and form as 
follows, to be placed upon the door of the infected apartments, or premises, to wit: 

NOTICE 

Tuberculosis is a communicable disease. These apartments have been occupied by a con- 
sum pt/ive and may have become infected. They must not be occupied until the order of the Health 
Commissioner directing tJieir renovation and disinfection has been complied with. 

This notice must not be removed under penalty of law, except by the Commissioner of Health 
or an authorized officer. 

And such placard shall not be removed until such time as the order'or directions of the 
Commissioner of Health shall have been complied with, and the removal of such placard 
authorized by the Commissioner of Health. 

Sec. 7. That any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this ordinance, and 
any person who, without written authority from the Commissioner of Health, shall remove, or 
induce another person to remove, any placard placed upon premises or apartments, as herein- 
before provided, shall, upon con\'iction thereof, be subject to a fine of not less than Five 
Dollars ($5.00) nor more than One Hundred Dollars ($100.00), or by imprisonment in the 
work house for not less than five (5) days nor more than ninety (90) days. 

Sec. 8. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage, approval 
and pubhcation. 

[Approved in 1905.] 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

AN ORDINANCE to prevent spitting in certain public places in the city of Wilmington. 
Be it ordained by the Council of Wilmington: 

Section i . It shall be unlawful on and after the passage of this ordinance for any person 
to spit on the sidewalk, crossing or footway of any pubUc streetway, park or square, or upon 
the floor of any hall or office in any hotel, apartment house, tenement or lodging house which 
is used in common by the guests or tenants thereof, or upon the floor, platform, steps or stairs 
of any public building, hall, church, theatre, railway station, store or factory, street car or 
other public conveyance. 

Sec. 2. The term "spitting" as referred to in this ordinance shall be defined as follows: 
the act of expelling anything from the chest, throat, mouth or nose. 

Sec. 3. Any violations of this ordinance shall be punishable with a fine of not less than 
One Dollar nor more than Five Dollars for the first offence, and not less than Two Dollars 
nor more than Five Dollars for each succeeding offence. 

[Approved October 26, 1907.] 

INDL^APOLIS 

AN ORDINANCE to further promote the public health and cleanliness of the City of In- 
dianapolis by prohibiting the practice of spitting upon sidewalks, in street cars and other 
public places, fixing a penalty for the violation thereof, and providing when the same shall 
take effect. 

Be it ordained by the Common Council of the City of Indianapolis, Indiana: 

Section i. That it shall be unlawful for any person to spit upon any sidewalk within the 
limits of the City of Indianapolis, or upon the floors or steps of any street car or other pubHc 
conveyance of said city, or upon the floors, steps or entrances of any public building within 
said city, or upon the floors, steps or platform of any railroad station therein. 

Sec. 2. Any person violating any of the provisions of Section i of this ordinance, shall, 
upon conviction thereof, be fined in any sima not exceeding two dollars. 

280 



Supplementary Directory of Anti- 
Tuberculosis Institutions and 
Organizations 
in Canada 



Supplementary Directory of Anti-Tuber- 
culosis Institutions and Organizations 
in Canada 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

Instead of listing the Canadian anti-tuberculosis agencies under their re- 
spective sections, following the United States agencies, as has been done in the 
two former editions of the Directory, these institutions and organizations have 
been grouped together in a special section. This section of the Directory has 
been compiled largely from material furnished by the Canadian Association 
for the Prevention of Tuberculosis. 

The same general plan of arrangement has been followed as in the other 
sections of the Directory. The Provincial associations are placed first and the 
other organizations are arranged alphabetically according to location. A 
similar arrangement is followed for sanatoria and dispensaries. The figures in 
parentheses indicate the date of establishment or organization. 



283 



Tuberculosis Sanatoria and Hospitals 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 

KAMLOOPS 

RIVERSIDE COTTAGE (1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 15. Rates: — On appli- 
cation. Attending Physician: — Dr. R. W. Irving. Application should be made to the 
Attending Physician. 

TRANQUILLE 

KING EDWARD SANATORIUM (190S): 

For incipient cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — For full-paying patients $15.00 per week 
for residents; non-residents, $18.00. No case from British Columbia refused because of 
inabihty to pay. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. C. H. Vrooman. Secretary: — Dr. C. 
J. Fagan, Victoria. Application should be made to the Superintendent or the Secretary. 



MANITOBA 



NINETTE 

MANITOBA SANATORIUM FOR CONSUMPTIVES (May, 1910): 
For early cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Capacity: — 60. Rates: — $12.00 per week 
for those able to pay; indigent patients are treated without charge. Medical Superinten- 
dent: — Dr. David A. Stewart. Application should be made to the Medical Superintendent. 

WINNIPEG 

THE WINNIPEG GENERAL HOSPITAL (1908): 

Receives moderately advanced and advanced cases. Capacity for tuberculous 

patients: — 25. Rates: — There are no charges. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. Fred 
Bell. 



NOVA SCOTIA 



KENTVILLE 

PROVINCIAL SANATORIUM (June, 1904): 

For early cases of tuberculosis. Capacity: — 30. Rates: — $5.00 per week. Physician: 
— Dr. F. Miller. Note: — The Sanatorium is supported by the provincial government. 
Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

284 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY SANATORIA AND HOSPITALS 

ONTARIO 



GRAVENHURST 

THE MINNEWASKA (March 3, 1909): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $10.00 to 
$18.00 per week. Medical Director :— Dr. C. D. Parfitt. Manager :— Mrs. E. G. Fournier. 

MUSKOKA COTTAGE SANATORIUM (1897): 

Primarily for early cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, but moderately advanced cases are 
admitted if they have a fair chance for recovery. Capacity: — 105. Rates: — $12.00 and 
$15.00 per week. Physician in Charge:— Dr. W. B. Kendall. Application should be 
made to the Secretary, 347 King Street, W., Toronto. 

MUSKOKA FREE HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES (April, 1902): 
For persons in the early stages of consumption who are unable to pay for sanatorium 
treatment. Capacity: — 150. Rates: — There are no charges. Physician in Charge: — 
Dr. W. B. Kendall. Application should be made to the Secretary, 347 King Street, W., 
Toronto. 

HAMILTON 

THE MOUNTAIN SANATORIUM (May 28, 1905) : 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity:— 60. _ Rates: — No charges 
to $10.00 per week; twenty free beds are maintained. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. H. 
Holbrook. Application should be made to the Physician in Charge. 

SOUTHAM HOME FOR ADVANCED CASES: 
Capacity : — 24. 

LONDON (P. O. Byron) 

THE QUEEN ALEXANDRA SANATORIUM (August 8, 1910): 

For incipient and moderately advanced cases. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — $.50, $.70 

and $1.50 per day. Medical Superintendent:— Dr. C. S. Mahood. Application should 

be made to the Superintendent. 

OTTAWA 

THE "LADY GREY" HOSPITAL (February 15, 1910): 

For advanced cases. Capacity: — 45. Rates: — There are no charges. Physician in 
Charge :— Dr. J. K. M. Gordon. 

ST. CATHARINES 

ST. CATHARINES CONSUMPTIVE SANATORIUM (October 19, 1909): 

For all classes of cases. Capacity: — 20. Rates: — There are no charges. Secretary: 

— A. W. Taylor. Matron: — Mrs. A. Gadsby. Application should be made to the City 

Physicians. 

TORONTO 

HEATHER CLUB PAVILION FOR TUBERCULOUS CHILDREN (1909): 
Capacity: — 14. Rates: — There are no charges. Supported by the Heather Club, 
an organization of graduate nurses. 

KING EDWARD SANATORIUM FOR CONSUMPTIVES (August, 1907): 
For patients in the advanced stages of consumption who are in a position to pay for 
treatment. Capacity: — 40. Rates: — $15.00 and $18.00 a week. Physician in Charge : — 

285 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY SANATORIA AND HOSPITALS 

Dr. W. J. Dobbie. Applications for admission should be made to the Secretary, 347 King 
Street, W., Toronto. 

TORONTO FREE HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES (post-office, Weston) 
(September, 1904): 

For persons in .the advanced and far-advanced stages of consumption who are unable to 
pay for sanatorium treatment. Capacity: — 115. Rates: — There are no charges. Physi- 
cian in Charge:— Dr. W. J. Dobbie. Application for admission should be made to the 
Secretary, 347 King Street, W., Toronto. 



QUEBEC 

LAKE EDWARD 

LAKE EDWARD SANATORIUM (Oct. i, 1910): 

For incipient cases. Capacity: — 25. Rates: — $7.00 to $15.00 per week. Medical 
Superintendent: — Dr. D. A. Craig. Application should be made to the Superintendent. 

MONTREAL 

THE GRACE DART HOME, HOSPITAL FOR DESTITUTE INCURABLES, 

418 St. Antoine Street (1909): 
Receives advanced cases of tuberculosis. Capacity: — 50. Rates: — There are no 
charges. Managing Director: — H. J. Dart. Secretary: — C. Withycomb. Applica- 
tion should be made at the office of the Hospital, 155 Craig Street, West, 

STE. AGATHE DES MONTS 

BREHMER REST (1905): ■ 

P'or those predisposed to tuberculosis, and for convalescents from pneumonia, pleurisy, 
tj^hoid, etc. Capacity : — 15. Rates : — $4.00 per week. Several free patients are supported 
by the institution. Medical Superintendent: — Dr. A. J. Richer. Application should be 
made to the Superintendent. 

LAURENTIAN SANATORIUM FOR THE TREATMENT OF INCIPIENT TU- 
BERCULOSIS (191 i): 
Capacity: — 40. Rates: — $8.00 per week. Physician in Charge: — Dr. J. R. Byers. 



Tuberculosis Clinics and Dispensaries 



NEW BRUNSWICK 

ST. JOHN 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY DISPENSARY (1910): 
Physician in Charge : — Dr. T. Walker. 

286 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY CLINICS AND DISPENSARIES 

ONTARIO 



HAMILTON 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY OF HAMILTON HEALTH ASSOCIATION 

(1906): 
Hours : — Twice a week. 

OTTAWA 

THE MAY COURT CLUB DISPENSARY, 248 Friel Street (June 17, 1908): 
Hours : — Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 11 A. M. to i P. M. Physicians in 
Charge : — Drs. Gibson and Paterson. 

TORONTO 

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC, TORONTO GENERAL HOSPITAL (1906) : 
Hours: — Tuesdays and Fridays at 10.30. Physician in Charge: — Dr. Harold C. 
Parsons. 

TUBERCULOSIS DISPENSARY AND CLINIC, ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL 

(January, 1909) 
Hours : — Once a week. Physician in Charge : — Dr. A. Adame. 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



CHARLOTTETOWN 

DISPENSARY OF THE PROVINCIAL ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (ic 
Physician in Charge : — Dr. MacLauchlan. 



QUEBEC 
MONTREAL 

ROYAL EDWARD INSTITUTE OF MONTREAL (Successor to the Montreal Tuber- 
culosis League), 47 Bebnont Park (November 7, 1904; reorganized under new name, 
October 21, 1909): 

Hours: — Week days from 11 A.M. to i P.M. Physician in Charge: — Dr. E. S. 
Harding. 

QUEBEC 

ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY DISPENSARY (1910) 



287 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY ASSOCIATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

Anti-Tuberculosis Associations and 
Committees 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(March, 1901): 
Executive Office: — 102 Bank Street, Ottawa, Ont. President: — Dr. J. George 
Adami, McGill University, Montreal. Secretary : — Dr. George D. Porter, 455 Huron Street, 
Toronto, Ont. Note : — The Canadian Association is supported by a grant from the Federal 
Government. 



ALBERTA 



CALGARY 

CALGARY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY: 

A committee composed of Dr. Lafferty, Dr. W. Graham, Dr. Anderson, Rev. Mr. Pratt 
with others are completing the organization. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATION 

THE BRITISH COLUMBIA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1904): 
President:— A. C. Flumerfelt. Secretary:— Dr. C. J. Fagan, Victoria. Note: — 

This association has twenty-nine branch societies throughout the cities and towns of British 

Columbia. 



MANITOBA 

WINNIPEG 

THE WINNIPEG ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1908): 

President : — Dr. H. H. Chown. Secretary : — Dr. Fred A. Young, 334 Portage Avenue. 



288 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY ASSOCIATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATION 

THE NEW BRUNSWICK ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1909): 
President:— Dr. Thomas Walker. Corresponding Secretary:— Rev. T. Hunter 
Boyd. 



FREDERICTON 

FREDERICTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President :— Judge Barry. Secretary-Treasurer: — Dr. W. H. Irvine. 

MONCTON 

MONCTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — Dr. R. L. Botsford. Secretary: — Dr. L. C. Hains. 

ST. JOHN 

ST. JOHN ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(May 31, 1909): 
President : — Justice McKeown. Secretary : — Miss Helen Sidney Smith, 276 Rockland 
Road, St. John. 



NOVA SCOTIA 



AMHERST 

AMHERST ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1908): 
President: — I. C. Craig. Secretary: — Dr. R. H. Burrell. 

ANTIGONISH 

TRI-COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF ANTIGONISH, GUYS- 
BOROUGH AND PICTOU COUNTIES (November 18, 1909): 

President: — Dr. John W. MacKay, New Glasgow. Secretary: — John W. MacLeod, 
Antigonish. 

ANTIGONISH COUNTY LEAGUE (1909): 

President: — Rev. H. P. MacPherson, D.D., Rector of St. Francis Xavier College. 
Secretary: — J. W. McLeod. 

BADDECK 

BADDECK ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1909): 
President: — Dr. D. MacDonald. 

CANSO 

CANSO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — Mayor Whitman. Secretary: — Dr. P. A. McGarry. 
19 289 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY ASSOCIATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

CAPE BRETON COUNTY 

CAPE BRETON ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF CONSUMPTION 
AND OTHER FORMS OF TUBERCULOSIS (January 20, 1910): 

President: — Rev. D. M. MacAdam, Sydney. Secretary-Treasurer: — Dr. R. J. 
MacDonald, Cape Breton. 

COLCHESTER COUNTY 

COLCHESTER COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TU- 
BERCULOSIS (January, 1905): 
President: — J. B. Calhin. Secretary: — Dr. Smith L. Walker, Truro. 

GLACE BAY 

GLACE BAY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
Vice-President : — Neil J. Gillis. 

GUYSBORO COUNTY 

GUYSBORO COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 

President: — Dr. J. A. Mackenzie, Mulgrave. Secretary: — L. J. Shanahan, Mulgrave. 

HALIFAX COUNTY 

HALIFAX COUNTY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (June, 1909): 
President: — Dr. John Stewart, 28 South Street, Halifax. Secretary: — Mrs. William 

Schon, 83 Morris Street, Halifax. 

INVERNESS, C. B. 

INVERNESS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 

President: — Hon. D. H. McLeod. Secretary: — Dr. James A. Proudfoot. 

LOUISBURG 

LOUISBURG ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — Rev. T. A. Draper. Secretary: — Dr. D. A. Morrison. 

NORTH SYDNEY 

NORTH SYDNEY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — Mayor Kelly. Secretary: — Dr. M. T. MacLean. 

PICTOU COUNTY 

PICTOU COUNTY LEAGUE (1909): 

President: — Rev. Dr. McVicar. Secretary: — Miss Carmichael, New Glasgow. 

STELLARTON 

THE STELLARTON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — ^John Fellows. Secretary: — N. A. Osborne. 

SYDNEY 

SYDNEY LADIES' AUXILIARY (1910): 

President: — Mrs. H. S. Ross. Secretary: — Mrs. E. J. Johnson. 

SYDNEY MINES 

SYDNEY MINES ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — Dr. L. Johnson. Secretary:— D. E. MacDonald. 

290 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY ASSOCIATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

WINDSOR 

WINDSOR ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President:— Dr. J. P. Black. Secretary-Treasurer :—0. B. Kcddy. 



ONTARIO 



ALMONTE 

THE ALMONTE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1908): 
President: — William Thorburn. Secretary: — Dr. J. F. Hanley. 

ARNPRIOR 

THE ARNPRIOR ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCU- 
LOSIS (1908): 
President: — Dr. J. G. Cranston. Secretary-Treasurer: — Charles McNamara. 

BERLIN 

THE BERLIN ANTI-CONSUMPTION LEAGUE (1908): 
President: — F. W. Sheppard. Secretary: — Dr. G. H. Bowlby. 

BRANT 

THE BRANT ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1909): 
President:— Dr. H. R. Frank. Secretary:— John T. Hewitt. 

BROCKVILLE 

THE BROCKVILLE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — Dr. J. C. Mitchell. Secretary: — William Shearer. 

CHATHAM 

CHATHAM ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President : — ^John Park. Secretary : — Charles Austin. 

GALT 

THE GALT ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1908): 

President: — Dr. J. H. Radford. Secretary-Treasurer: — ^John R. Blake. 

GUELPH 

THE GUELPH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1909): 
President : — J. P. Downey. Secretary : — Dr. W. O. Stewart. 

HAMILTON 

THE HAMILTON HEALTH ASSOCIATION (1904): 
President: — W. D. Long. Secretary-Treasurer: — W. J. Southam. 

LONDON 

THE LONDON HEALTH ASSOCIATION (1909): 
President : — Hon. Adam Beck. Secretary-Treasurer : — H. E. Gates. 

291 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY ASSOCIATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

OTTAWA 

THE OTTAWA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (September 28, 1904): 
President: — James Manuel, 36 Vittoria Street. Secretary: — Walter Tucker, James 
Street. 

OWEN SOUND 

THE OWEN SOUND ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY (1910): 
President: — James MacLauchlan. Secretary: — Dr. H. G. Murray. 

PEMBROKE 

THE PEMBROKE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President — S. E. Mitchell. Secretary: — A. J. Fortier. 

RENFREW 

RENFREW ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — Dr. James Mann. Secretary: — Hon. A. Gravelle. 

SMITH'S FALLS 

SMITH'S FALLS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION (1909): 
President: — G. F. McKimm. Secretary-Treasurer: — Dr. C. L. B. Stammers. 

TORONTO 

THE TORONTO LEAGUE FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1909): 
President:— P. C. Larkin. Secretary:— Dr. J. H. Elliott. 

WATERLOO 

THE WATERLOO ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1908): 
President: — Frank Haight. Secretary: — Dr. W. L. Hilliard. 

WOODSTOCK 

THE WOODSTOCK ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — D. W. Karn. Secretary: — Dr. Mackenzie McKay. 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATION 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS (1909): 

President: — Dr. D. McLachlan, Charlottetown. Secretary-Treasurer: — Miss D. E. 
Blois, Charlottetown. 



CHARLOTTETOWN 

CHARLOTTETOWN BRANCH OF THE PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND ASSO- 
CIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1909): 
President: — W. F. Tidmarsh. Secretary: — Mrs. W. E. Bentley. 

292 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY ASSOCIATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

QUEENS AND KING COUNTY 

QUEENS AND KING COUNTY BRANCH OF THE PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 

ASSOCIATION FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS (1909): 
President: — Dr. D. McLachlan. Secretary-Treasurer: — Reuben MacDonald. 



QUEBEC 



PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATION 

THE QUEBEC ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 

President:— Sir F. Langelier, Chief Justice, Province of Quebec. Secretaries:— Drs. 
Alphonse Lessard, W. H. Delaney, and O. Leclerc. 



MONTREAL 

THE MONTREAL LEAGUE FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(1902): 
See Royal Edward Institute Tuberculosis Dispensary. 

QUEBEC 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE OF QUEBEC (February 19, 1909): 
Executive Office: — 133 Boulevard Langelier, Quebec. President: — Hon. Judge 
Chs. Langelier. Secretary: — Dr. Alphonse Lessard, 134 St. Francois Street. 

SHERBROOKE 

DISTRICT OF ST. FRANCIS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (July, 1903): 
President: — Hon. P. Pelletier. Secretary-Treasurer: — Dr. E. J. Williams. 

THREE RIVERS 

THREE RIVERS ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President: — Dr. L. P. Normand. Secretary: — Aug. Desilets. 



SASKATCHEWAN 



PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATION 

SASKATCHEWAN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President: — P. McAra. Secretary: — Dr. M. M. Seymour, Regina. 



ABERNETHY 

ABERNETHY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President: — Hon. Mr. Motherwell. 

293 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY ASSOCIATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

BATTLEFORD 

BATTLEFORD ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President:— Dr. Stanley Millar. Secretary:— W. R. Kingston. 

CARNDRUFF 

CARNDRUFF ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President: — Dr. W. F. Lockhart. 

DAVIDSON 

DAVIDSON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President:— H. G. Craig. Secretary :— Dr. F. Hutchinson. 

ESTEVAN 

ESTEVAN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
Secretary:— L. A. Duncan. 

FLEMING 

FLEMING ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President:- Dr. D. D. Ellis. 

GRENFELL 

GRENFELL ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
President:— Hugh Dobson. Secretary:— Harry Laver. 

HANLEY 

HANLEY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
Secretary : — F. Kilpatrick. 

INDIAN HEAD 

INDIAN HEAD ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President:— J. H. Francis. Secretary :—R. S. Campbell. 

LUMSDEN 

LUMSDEN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President:— F. Watson. Secretary :—W. R. Jamieson. 

MILESTONE 

MILESTONE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
Secretary: — J. Murphy. 

MOOSEJAW 

MOOSE JAW ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President: — E. J. Chegivin. 

MOOSOMIN 

MOOSOMIN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
Secretary: — A. Whyte. 

PRINCE ALBERT 

PRINCE ALBERT ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
Secretary: — Dr. B. A. Hopkins. 

294 



CANADIAN DIRECTORY ASSOCIATIONS AND COMMITTEES 

REGINA 

REGINA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1909): 
Secretary: — A. L. Gordon. 

SASKATOON 

SASKATOON ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
Secretary: — Professor George H. Ling. 

WAPELLA 

WAPELLA ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President: — Dr. Donald MacDonald. Secretary: — Dr. D. P. Miller. 

WEYBURN 

WEYBURN ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President: — Dr. S. M. Bowman. Secretary: — W. J. Bullis. 

WHITEWOOD 

WHITEWOOD ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President:— Dr. J. R. Bird. 

WOLSELEY 

WOLSELEY ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE (1910): 
President: — R. J. Cooke. Secretary: — A. D. Ferguson. 



29s 



APPENDIX 

Tables Showing Growth of Anti-Tuber- 
culosis Movement 



TABLE SHOWING DISPENSARIES AND CLINICS FOR THE TREATMENT OF 
TUBERCULOSIS IN THE UNITED STATES BEFORE 1905 AND UP TO 

APRIL 1, 1911^ 



Name of State. 


td M • 
55 P o 

w t*^ S. 

om 


M 

Z 
14 

o 


During 

Opened 

During 

1906. 




Sao 

OQ 


Q 

^ 1-4 00 

(4 ai 
00 


a 

£ » ? 

OQ" 


Opened 

During 

1910. 


Opened 
Duxing 

1911 
(April i). 


Totals 

TO 

April 1, 
1911. 


Alabama 

Alaska . . . 


4 

I 

8 

I 

2 

I 




I 

I 2 

3 2 

I 

I 

4 

I 

I I 


I 
2 

I 

I 

I 
I 

4 

I 
4 

2 

25 

2 


2 

2 

4 
2 

I 
I 

"s 

I 

2 
II 

82 

I 

I 


I 

2 

I 
I 

2 

I 

7 
2 
8 

3 
10 

9 

7 

I 


2 
I 

6 
2 

I 

I 

3 

2 
2 

I 

4 

I 
I 

IS 

2 

5 

I 

4 

I 

I 

I 
I 
I 
3 


I 

4 

I 
I 
3 

2 
2 

2 

I 

2 


2 


Arizona • 




Arkansas 




California 


5 


Colorado 


Connecticut 


4 
8 


Delaware 


District of Columbia 

Florida 


7 


Georgia 




Hawaii 




Idaho 




Illinois 




Indiana 




Iowa 


I 


Kansas 




Kentucky 


5 


Louisiana 


Maine 


5 
4 
30 
5 
4 


Maryland 


Massachusetts 


Michigan 


Minnesota 


Mississippi 


Missouri 


13 


Montana 


Nebraska 




Nevada 




New Hampshire 

New Jersey 


I 
10 


New Mexico 




New York 


54 
2 


North -Carolina 


North Dakota 




Ohio 


9 


Oklahoma 


Oregon 


I 


Pennsylvania 


124 
I 

7 
5 

I 


Philippine Islands 

Porto Rico 




South Carolina 


South Dakota 




Tennessee 


I 


Texas 


I 


Utah 




Vermont 




Virginia 


4 


Washington 


I 


West Virginia 


2 


Wisconsin 


6 


Wyoming 




Totals 


i8 




6 14 


45 


118 


59 


62 


20 


342 







* The figures for 191 1 include only those dispensaries which have been opened, or will 
probably be opened before January i, 191 2. 



TABLE SHOWING ASSOCIATIONS FOR THE PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 
IN THE UNITED STATES BEFORE 1905 AND UP TO APRIL 1, 1911 



Name op State. 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut . . . . 

Delaware 

District of Col- 
umbia '. . 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . 

Michigan 

Miimesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey . . . . 

New Mexico . . . 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota . . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . . 

Philippine 
Islands 

Porto Rico 

Rhode Island . . . 

South Carolina , 

South Dakota . , 

Tennessee , 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont , 

Virginia 

Washington . . . , 

West Virginia . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Totals 



Founded 

Before 

1 90s. 



Founded 

During 

1 90s. 



IS 



Founded 

During 

1906. 



18 



Founded 

During 

1907. 



14 

I 



46 
299 



Founded 

During 

1908. 



2 

9 

13 

7 



2 

I 
2 
4 

109 



Founded 

During 

1909. 



4 
7 
I 
2 
5 

23' 
2 



I 
6 

I 

46 

6 



4 

I 

4 
7 

167 



Founded 

During 

1910. 



30 
4 



2 

4 

5 
7 

117 



Founded 
During 

1911. 
(April 1) 



Totals 

TO 

April i, 
1911. 



4 

4 
15 

2 
II 

2 



S 

2 

10 

IS 

4 

9 

38 

43 

18 

12 

I 
4 

2 

33 

I 

104 

12 

I 
13 

S 

2 

19 



3 

19 
10 



10 
7 



23 



Sii 



■H3aHQM 



<^00'«tOO>OiOtNOOO<3>JOOOfOfO'^'*OrOt^MOO ■^oo 

^ i-i rf t^ O OO ro iJO rO ■^ rO Tj-vO 00 O t^OO rO ^0 »O00 M CO ro tN t^ 



U5 

o 






C/2 05 



U>-1 
I— ( 

< 



2-^ 



■spag 
JO o^i 



•BIIO^BnBg I 

JO -ON 



<NMC>MrOMrOMCS 






O M PL 

ft -5 



•spaa 
JO -ON 



lO o •* o o 

W O ■* lO M 

CO It 



•■Buoi^n'Bg 
JO -ON 



C< M PO M M 



HI M M 



•spaa 
JO -CM 



•■BUO^BU'Bg 
JO OM 



M r^oo voon T}-ioiOMTj-rot^i-ir^ 

MMrOMlO MCSIN -MM -M •t^MCO 



•spaa 
jooM 



•Biio^BU'eg 
■jo -OM 



•spaa 
JO •ON 



•EUOlBnEg 

JO -ON 



M O lOOO 

o Tt r~-oo 

ON M 







o 


lO 


•<t 


n 


cs 


O 


O 


o 


o 


■* 


00 


't 


lO 


•sjjaa 


M 


^ . 


. OO 


CO 


'^ . 


Ol 


vO 


lO 




f^ . 


. . ^ >o . 


"•> . . 


JO 


•ON 





























•■BUOJ'Bn'BS 

JO •ON 



■spaa 
JO -ON 



••BUO^'Bn'BS 

JO •ON 



•spag 
JO ON 



■■BlIOl'En'BS 

JO -ON 



O 

w 
o 



O »o r^oo •<!■ 

CO M 




•aaajiflN 



w M CO "^^ >00 I^OO O* O M w CO Tt loO I^OO 0> O M M CO •* io>0 r^OO O 



<MC<M«CiP»CtMO«P) 



300 



O f^ o ^ 

H t^ M 1 



cs roco O^ iJ^ lo M -O lo Th 

M lO M CO 04 CO 



CO >0 lO ro 


M 


■^^^ 


<o 


„ 


■* 


to 


CO W O M 


<N VO 00 


C^ 


lo -"d- 


COO 


p< 


M 


H 


t^ 


*^ 




M 






M 






















Tt- 


O vO 




O 




O 


M 






O 


O 




■D-o 


n 




n 


o 


O 


o 


M 


•* Tt- 








CO 


O) 






lO 


LO 






() 








■+ 


o>o 




M 




t^ 






^ 






W 








" 


" 












CO 


H (N 




o 




» 


00 






M 


M 




H 


CO 


M 




" 


H 


CO 


e) • 




O 


o 


o 


8 




(S 


O 


o 


O 


CJ 


lO 








O 


cq 


CS 






CO 


•* lO 






-t 


<N 


lo O 


■>+ 


. CO . 








H 


vO 


Tt 












ro 


M 




M 






"^ 


M 






















• M 


N 


O^ 


CC 




rO 


H 


H 


rf 


Ol 


■ M • 








: " 


M 


C4 






00 



(D 

d 

OJ 

a 
o 

3 



lO • M M 



O O lo O 

^ Ti" CO M 
■* M 



M N O CO 



• <N H 


C) ■ 




• • CS • 


H M 




• W M 


■ CO • 


o 

CO 


vO lo 

. Ol 00 


o) O 

M CO 


. o 

. 00 


M 

* M 




. . o 




O . 

. "* : 




• H P) 


<M H 


• 1-1 














^ 




c^ 




M 














. . o 


Tj- XT, 

r^ csi 




. o o . 

. ^ CO . 


. o . 

M 


lO 

: 00 ! 






CO 


^ 


lO H 




M M 


CN 








00 
M 








*^ 



















-a 



H >0 CO CO 



1^ ^ 



a >% o • o a 
^ S^ OCJQ 



T3.S2 

:2;;z;:2;^^;z;ooopHpHPH(:^c^cBHHt)>>^ 

Ol ro tT lo>0 t^OO O O 



fl C 






301 



INDEX 



The various forms of anti-tuberculosis activity are arranged in the Index under the several cities and states, 
which are in turn arranged alphabetically. The figures immediately following any form of activity indicate the 
number of that form of activity in the city or state mentioned. A star following the word " associations " indi- 
cates a state organization. 



PAGE 

Abbeville, S.C.: 

Association 190 

Abernethy, Sask.: 

Association 293 

Adam, J. N., Hospital (N. Y.) 44 

Adams, Mass. : 

Association 155 

Sanatorium 30 

Adirondack Cottage Sanitarium (N. Y.) 51 

Agnes Memorial Sanatorium (Colo.) ... 17 

Aiken, S. C: 

Association 190 

Sanatorium 63 

Akron, Ohio.: 

Legislation 245 

Sanatorium 55 

Alabama. : 

Associations (2) 142 

Dispensaries (2) ^ 91 

Insane Hospitals (2) 71 

Legislation 218 

Sanatoria (2) 11 

Alameda, Cal.: 

Association 143 

Alameda County, Cal. : 

Association 144 

Dispensary 92 

InjQrmary 15 

Alamo Cottage Sanatorium (N. Mex.) . . 41 

Alamogordo, N. Mex.: 

Sanatoria (2) 41 

Alaska. : 

Sanatorium 12 

Albany, N.Y.: 

Association 171 

Dispensary 105 

Legislation 241 

Open Air School 134 

Sanatoria (3) 44 

Alberta. : 

Association. ...,,,,,.,..,.,.,.,. 288 



Albion, N.Y.: 

Association 171 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. : 

Sanatoria (3) 42 

Alexandria, La. : 

Association 152 

Alexandria, Va.: 

Association 191 

Alexian Brothers' Dispensary (Mo.) .... 103 
Allegany County (Md.) Association. . . 154 
Allen County, Ohio: 

Association 184 

Sanatorium 57 

Allen, Crawford, Memorial Hospital 

(R.L) 63 

Allen, Henry W., School (La.) 133 

Allentown, Pa.: 

Association 185 

Dispensary 112 

Legislation 247 

Almonte, Ont. : 

Association 291 

Alpena, Mich.: 

Association 159 

Alta, Cal.: 

Sanatorium 13 

Altamont, N. Y.: 

Association 171 

Alto, Ga.: 

Sanatoriimi 21 

Altoona, Pa.: 

Dispensary 112 

Legislation 247 

Altus, Okla.: 

Association 184 

American Society for the Prevention 

and Cure of Tuberculosis (New 

York) 177 

Ames', Dr., Sanatorium (La.) 27 

Amherst, N. S.: 

Association 289 



303 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Amite City, La.: 

Association 152 

Amsterdam, N. Y.: 

Association 172 

Dispensary 105 

Legislation . ' 241 

Anamosa, la.: 

Penal Institution 85 

Anderson, S. C: 

Association 190 

Andover, Me. : 

Sanatorium 28 

Andover, Mass. : 

Association 156 

Androscoggin (Me.): 

Association 154 

Dispensary 98 

Annapolis, Md.: 

Association 154 

Ann Arbor, Mich.: 

Association 159 

Sanatorium 35 

Anne Arundel County (Md.) Association 154 
Antigonish, N. S.: 

Association 289 

Antonito, Colo.: 

Sanatorium 16 

Arecibo, P. R.: 

Association 187 

Arequipa Sanatorium (Cal.) 14 

Arizona : 

Associations* (4) 142 

Legislation 219 

Penal Institution 83 

Sanatoria (9) 12 

Arizona Health League of Tucson 142 

Arkansas: 

Associations* (4) 143 

Legislation 219 

Sanatorium 13 

Arlington Street Class (Mass.) 99 

Armstrong, Mo.: 

Association 165 

Amprior, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Asheville, N. C: 

Sanatoria (4) 54 

Asheville-Biltmore Sanatorium (N. C.) . 54 

Association Health Farm (Colo.) 17 

Association of Tuberculosis Clinics 

(Bkln.) 108 

Association of Tuberculosis Clinics 

(N. Y.) 106 

Associations 141 

Association Table 299 

Asylum, Miss.: 

Insane Hospital 76 

Athens, Ohio: 

Insane Hospital 78 



PAGE 

Atlanta, Ga.: 

Association 147 

Dispensaries (2) 95 

Legislation 223 

Penal Institution 84 

Sanatoria (3) 22 

Atlantic City, N. J.: 

Association 168 

Attleboro, Mass.: 

Association 156 

Auburn, Me.; 

Dispensary 98 

Auburn, N. Y.: 

Legislation 242 

Auglaize County (Ohio) Hospital 57 

Augusta, Ga.: 

Association 147 

Legislation 223 

Sanatorium 22 

Augusta County (Va.) Association 192 

Au Sable, Mich.: 

Association 159 

Austin, Minn.: 

Association 163 

Austin, Tex.: 

Association 191 

Insane Hospital 79 

Bacon Memorial Mission Dispensary 

(III.) 96 

Baddeck, N. S.: 

Association 289 

Baguio, P. I.: 

Sanatorium 62 

Baldwin Sanatorium (Tex.) 65 

Ballston Spa., N. Y.: 

Association 172 

Baltimore, Md.: 

Association 154 

Dispensaries (4) 98 

Legislation 230 

Sanatoria (2) 29 

Bangor, Me.: 

Association 154 

Dispensary 98 

Insane Hospital 74 

Sanatorium 28 

Bangor, Pa.: 

Dispensary 112 

Banning, Cal.: 

Sanatorium 13 

Barlow Sanatorium (Cal.) 14 

Barnes University Hospital (Mo.) 103 

Batavia, N. Y.: 

Association 172 

Bates County (Mo.) Association 165 

Baton Rouge, La.: 

Association 153 



304 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Bath, N. Y.: 

Association 172 

Sanatorium 44 

Battle Creek, Mich.: 

Association 160 

Battleford, Sask.: 

Association 294 

Battle Hill Sanatorium (Ga.) 22 

Battle Mountain Sanatorium (S. D.) ... 64 
Bay City, Mich.: 

Association 160 

Bay Ridge Hospital Dispensary (N. Y.) 108 

Bay View Hospital (Mass.) 32 

Beaver Dam, Wis.: 

Association 194 

Beaver Falls, Pa.: 

Dispensary 112 

Bedford Class (N. Y.) 108 

Bedford Station, N. Y.: 

Sanatorium 44 

Belding, Mich. : 

Association 160 

Belief onte, Pa.: 

Dispensary 112 

BelleviUe, N. J.: 

Sanatorium 40 

Bellevue Day Camp Open Air Classes 

(N. Y.) 136 

Bellevue Hospital Clinic (N. Y.) 106 

Bellingham, Wash.: 

Association 192 

Sanatorium 67 

Bell Memorial Hospital (Kans.) 26 

BelmoEtt, Cal.: 

Sanatorium 13 

Benton Harbor, Mich.: 

Association 160 

Berkeley, Cal.: 

Dispensary 92 

Legislation 220 

Berks County (Pa.) Association 186 

Berlin, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Berwick, Pa.: 

Dispensary 112 

Bessemer, Mich.: 

Association .' 160 

Bethlehem, Pa.: 

Association 185 

Beverly, N. J.: 

Association 168 

Bilibid Prison (P. I.) 87 

Biltmore, N. C: 

Sanatorium 54 

Binghamton, N. Y.: 

Association 172 

Insane Hospital 77 

Legislation 242 

Sanatorium 44 

20 30s 



Birdville Sanatorium (Va.) 67 

Birmingham, Ala.: 

Association 142 

Dispensary 91 

Legislation 219 

Sanatorium 11 

Bismarck, N. D.: 

Association 182 

Black Mountain, N. C: 

Sanatoria (3) 54 

Black River Falls, Wis.: 

Association 194 

Blake School (D. C.) 132 

Bloomington, 111.: 

Association 148 

Bloomsburg, Pa.: 

Dispensary 113 

Blue Earth County (Minn.) Associa- 
tion 164 

Blue Moimd Sanatorium (Wis.) 68 

Blue Ridge Mountain Sanatoriima (Pa.) . 59 

Boehne Farm (Ind.) 24 

Bogalusa, La.: 

Association 153 

Bon Air Sanatorium (Pa.) SQ 

Boonville, Ark.: 

Sanatorium 13 

Boonville, N. Y. : 

Association 172 

Boston, Mass.: 

Associations (3) 155, 156 

Dispensaries (13) 99 

Legislation 231 

Open Air Schools (5) 133 

Penal Institution 85 

Sanatoria (9) 30 

Boulder Lodge Sanatorium (la.) : 26 

Bound Brook, N. J. : 

Association 168 

Box Spring Sanatoriimi (Cal.) 15 

Braddock, Pa.: 

Dispensary 113 

Bradford, Pa.: 

Association 185 

Dispensary 113 

Sanatorium 59 

Branch Hospital (Ohio) 55 

Brant, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Brattleboro, Vt.: 

Sanatorium 66 

Brehmer Rest (Que.) 286 

Bridgeport, Conn.: 

Legislation 221 

Sanatorivun 19 

Bridgeton, N. J.: 

Association 168 

Bridgewater Hospital for Criminal In- 
sane (Mass.) 75 



INDEX 



Bristol, Pa. : 

Dispensary 113 

Bristol, Tenn.: 

Association 190 

British Columbia: 

Association 288 

Sanatoria (2) 284 

Brockport, N. Y.: 

Association 172 

Brockton, Mass.: 

Association 156 

Dispensary 100 

Legislation 231 

Brockville, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Bronx Clinics (N. Y.) 107 

Brookfield, N. Y.: 

Association 172 

Brookline, Mass.: 

Association 156 

Sanatoria (2) 31 

BrookljTi, N. Y.: 

Associations (2) 177 

Dispensaries (9) 108 

Open Air School 136 

Sanatoria (7) 49 

Brook's, Dr., Sanatorium (Conn.) 20 

Brookville, Pa.: 

Dispensary 113 

Broome County (N. Y.) Association .... 172 

Brownsville Clinic (N. Y.) 108 

Bro\\Tisville, Pa.: 

Dispensary 113 

Brush, Colo.: 

Sanatorium 16 

Bryce Hospital for the Insane (Ala.) .... 71 

Buchanan County (Mo.) Association . . . 166 

Buckley House (N. Y.) 46 

Buffalo, N.Y.: 

Association 172 

Dispensary 105 

Insane Hospital 77 

Legislation 242 

Open Air School 134 

Sanatoria (4) 44 

Burlington, N. J. : 

Association 168 

Burrillville, R. I.: 

Association 188 

Butler, Mo.: 

Association 165 

Butler, Pa. : 

Dispensary 113 

Butte, Mont.: 

Legislation 237 

By-Laws of Associations 197 

Cadillac, Mich.: 

Association 160 



Calgary, Alb.: 

Association 288 

California: 

Associations* (15) 143 

Dispensaries (5) 92 

Insane Hospitals (2) 71 

Legislation 219 

Open Air Schools (2) 131 

Penal Institution 83 

Sanatoria (23) 13 

California, Mo.: 

Association 165 

Calumet, Mich.: 

Dispensary 102 

Cambridge, Md.: 

Association 154 

Cambridge, Mass. : 

Association 156 

Dispensary 100 

Legislation 232 

Open Air School 133 

Sanatoria (2) 31 

Cambridge, N. Y.: 

Association 172 

Camden, N. J.: 

Association 168 

Dispensary 104 

Legislation 239 

Camp Hygeia (La.) 27 

Camp Mount Pleasant (Mass.) ^^ 

Camp Yonah Sanatorium (Ga.) 22 

Canada : 

Associations (73) 288 

Dispensaries (8) 286 

Sanatoria (20) 284 

Canandaigua, N. Y.: 

Association 173 

Canastota, N. Y.: 

Associations 1 73 

Candor, N. Y.: 

Association 173 

Canon City, Colo.: 

Penal Ins titution 83 

Canso, N. S.: 

Association 289 

Canton, Mass.: 

Association 156 

Canton, N. Y.: 

Association 173 

Canton, Ohio: 

Association 183 

Dispensary in 

Legislation 245 

Cape Breton County (N. S.) Associa- 
tion 290 

Cape Girardeau, Mo.: 

Association 166 

Carlisle, Pa.: 

Dispensary 113 



306 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Carlton County (Minn.) Association . . . 164 
Carmel, N. Y.: 

Association 1 73 

Camdruff, Sask.: 

Association 294 

Carnegie, Pa.: 

Dispensary 113 

Carney Hospital Dispensary (Mass.) ... 99 
Caro, Mich.; 

Association 160 

Carson Cottage (N. C.) 54 

Catawba, Va. : 

Sanatoria (2) 66 

Cattaraugus, N. Y.: 

Association 1 73 

Cattaraugus County (N. Y.) Hospital . . 45 
Cazenovia, N. Y.: 

Association 173 

Cedar Rapids, la. : 

Legislation 227 

Cedarville, N. Y.: 

Association 173 

Celina, Ohio; 

Association 183 

Central Elm Sanatorium (Mass.) 33 

Centrallslip, N. Y.; 

Insane Hospital 77 

Central Maine: 

Association 154 

Sanatorium 28 

Chambersburg, Pa.: 

Dispensary 113 

Champaign County (Ohio) Hospital .... 57 

Channing Home (Mass.) 30 

Charleston, S. C; 

Association 190 

Dispensary 125 

Charleston, W. Va.: 

Associations, (2) 193 

Dispensary 127 

Charlotte, N. C: 

Association 181 

Dispensary no 

Charlottesville, Va. : 

Association 191 

Sanatorium 66 

Charlottetown, P. E. I.: 

Association . 292 

Dispensary 287 

Chatham, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Chattanooga, Tenn.: 

Association 191 

Legislation 251 

Sanatoriiun 64 

Chelsea, Mass. : 

Association 156 

Dispensary 100 



PAGE 

Legislation 232 

Sanatorium 32 

Chemawa, Ore.: 

Sanatorium 58 

Cherokee, la.: 

Insane Hospital 73 

Chester, Pa.: 

Dispensary 113 

Chicago, 111.: 

Associations (2) 148 

Dispensaries (11) 95 

Legislation 224 

Open Air Schools (6) 132 

Sanatoria (6) 23 

Chicago Winfield Tuberculosis Sana- 
torium (111.) 24 

Chillicothe, Ohio: 

Association 183 

Chippewa Co. (Mich.) Hospital 36 

Christ Church Dispensary (Md.) 98 

Cincinnati, Ohio: 

Association 183 

Dispensary in 

Legislation 245 

Open Air School 137 

Sanatoria (2) 55 

Clair Mont Sanatorium (Pa.) 61 

Clarinda, la.: 

Insane Hospital 73 

Clarion, Pa.; 

Dispensary 114 

Clarke County (Ohio) Hospital 57 

Clarke County (Wash.) Association .... 193 

Clarksburg, W. Va.; 

Association 193 

Classes for Tuberculosis 91 

Classes, Open Air Schools and 131 

Clearfield, Pa.: 

Dispensary 114 

Cleveland, Ohio: 

Associations (2) 183 

Dispensaries (4) in 

Legislation 245 

Sanatoria (4) 56 

Clinics 91 

Clinton, Mass.: 

Association 156 

Sanatorium 32 

Clinton County (Mich.) Association .... 163 

Clinton Prison (N. Y.) 86 

Cloquet, Minn. : 

Association 164 

Coatesville, Pa.; 

Dispensary 114 

Cohn, Kaspare, Hospital and Training 

School (Cal.) 14 

Cohoes, N. Y.: 

Association 173 

Dispensary 106 



307 



INDEX 



Colchester County (N. S.) Association . . 290 Corry, Pa.: 



Coldwater, Mich.: 

Association 160 

Collins Cottage (N. Y.) 51 

Colorado: 

Associations* (2) 145 

Dispensary 92 

Legislation 220 

Open Air Schools (2) 131 

Penal Institution 83 

Sanatoria (21) 16 

Colorado Springs, Colo.: 

Association 14S 

Legislation 221 

Open Air School 131 

Sanatoria (7) 16 

Columbia, Mo.: 

Association 166 

Columbia, Pa.: 

Dispensary 114 

Columbia, S. C: 

Penal Institution 87 

Columbiana County (Ohio) Hospital ... 55 
Columbus, Ohio: 

Association 183 

Dispensary m 

Insane Hospital 78 

Legislation 245 

Open Air Schools (2) 137 

Penal Institution 87 

Sanatorium S6 

Committees 141 

Concord, Mass.: 

Association 156 

Concord, N. H.: 

Association 167 

Sanatorium 39 

Connecticut: 

Associations* (11) i45 

Dispensary 93 

Insane Hospital 72 

Legislation 221 

Open Air Schools (2) 132 

Penal Institution 84 

Sanatoria (15) 18 

Connellsville, Pa.: 

Dispensary 114 

Constitutions of Associations 197 

Convalescent Home of the Children's 

Hospital (Mass.) 35 

Cook County, 111.: 

Hospital 23 

Infirmary 23 

Coopersville, Mich.: 

Association 160 

Corning, N. Y.: 

Association 1 73 



Dispensary 

Cortland, N.Y.: 

Association 

Coudersport, Pa.: 

Dispensary 

County Hospital Laws 

Covington, Ky.: 

Association 

Legislation 

Covington, La. : 

Association 

Sanatoria (2) 

Cragmont Sanatorium (N. C.) 

Cragmor Sanatorium (Colo.) 

Craig Colony for Epileptics (N. Y.) 

Crane Sanatorium, (Mass.) 

Cranston, R. I.: 

Association 

Cresson, Pa.: 

Sanatorium 

Crippled and Deformed Children Hos- 
pital (N. Y.) 

Crittenton Dispensary (Mich.) 

Cromwell, Conn.: 

Sanatorium 

Crookston, Minn.: 

Association 

Cuba, N. Y.: 

Association 

Cuenca Sanatorium (Minn.) 

CulUs Consumptives' Home (Mass.) 

Cumberland, Md.: 

Association 

Cumberland County (N. C.) Associa- 
tion 

Custer, S. D.: 

Sanatorium 

C5mthiana, Ky.: 

Association 



Dannemora, N. Y.: 

Penal Institution 

Danvers State Hospital (Mass.) 
Danville, Ind.: 

Sanatorium 

Danville, Pa. : 

Dispensary 

Danville, Va. : 

Association 

Dart, Grace, Home (Que.) 

Davenport, la.: 

Association 

Sanatorium 

Davidson, Sask.: 

Association 

Day Camps 



114 
173 

114 
263 

152 
228 

153 
27 

54 
16 
78 
33 



59 

53 
102 

19 

164 

174 
37 
30 

154 

182 

64 

151 



86 
74 

24 

114 

192 



150 

25 

294 



308 



INDEX 



PACE 

Dayton, Ohio: 

Association 183 

Legislation 245 

Sanatoria (3) 56 

Decatur, 111.: 

Legislation 225 

Deer Island Hospital (Mass.) 85 

Defiance County (Ohio) Hospital 56 

Delaware: 

Associations* (2) 146 

Dispensaries (8) 93 

Insane Hospital 72 

Legislation 222 

Penal Institution 84 

Sanatorium 20 

Delaware County (Ind.) Association. . . . 150 

Delta County (Mich.) Association 160 

Denison House Dispensary (Mass.) .... 99 

Denver, Colo.: 

Association 145 

Legislation 221 

Open Air School 132 

Sanatoria (8) 17 

Dermady Cottage Sanatorium (Pa.) .... 60 

DeRuyter, N. Y.: 

Association 174 

Des Moines, la.: 

Association 150 

Dispensary 97 

Sanatorium 25 

Detroit, Mich. : 

Association • 160 

Dispensaries (2) 102 

Legislation 234 

Sanatoria (2) 35 

Diggins Sanatorium (Cal.) 15 

Dispensaries 91 

Dispensary, Table 298 

District of Columbia: 

Association 147 

Dispensaries (7) 94 

Insane Hospital 72 

Legislation 222 

Open Air School 132 

Sanatoria (4) 21 

Dixmont, Pa.: 

Insane Hospital 78 

Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.: 

Association 1 74 

Dolgeville, N. Y.: 

Association 1 74 

Dorchester, Mass. (see Boston) : 

Dorchester County (Md.) Association . . 154 

Dorchester Free Dispensary (Massachu- 
setts) 99 

Douglas County (Neb.) Hospital 39 

Douglas Coimty (Wis.) Hospital 68 

Dover, Del.: 

Dispensary 93 



PAGE 

Doylestown, Pa,: 

Dispensary 114 

Drake County (Ohio) Hospital 57 

Drake Medical School Dispensary (la.) . 97 

Dryden, N. Y.: 

Association 174 

Du Bois, Pa.: 

Dispensary 114 

Dubuque, la.: 

Association 150 

Legislation 227 

Duluth, Minn. : 

Association 164 

Dispensary 102 

Legislation 235 

Sanatoria (2) 36 

Dundee, N.Y.: 

Association 174 

Dunkirk, N. Y.: 

Association 174 

Dispensary 106 

Dimn Cottages (N. C.) 54 

Durham, N. C. : 

Association 181 

Du Shore, Pa. : 

Dispensary 115 

Duval County (Fla.) Association 147 



Eagleville, Pa.: 

Sanatorium 59 

EastBloomfield, N.Y.: 

Sanatorium 45 

East Bridgewater, Mass.: 

Sanatorium 32 

East Farm Sanatorium (Ariz.) 12 

East Greenwich, R. I.: 

Association 188 

Sanatorimn 63 

East Las Vegas, N. Mex.: 

Sanatorium 42 

Easton, Md.: 

Association 155 

Easton, Pa. : 

Association 185 

Dispensary 115 

East Orange, N. J.: 

Legislation 239 

East Providence, R. I. : 

Association 188 

East St. Louis, 111.: 

Legislation 225 

East View, N.Y.: 

Sanatorium 45 

Eaton, Ohio: 

Association 183 

Eaton Rapids, Mich,: 

Association 160 



309 



INDEX 



Eau Claire, Wis.: 

Association 194 

Eben-Ezer Mercy Institute (Colo.) 16 

Eddyville, Ky.: 

Penal Institution 85 

Edgecombe County (N. C.) Association 182 
Edgewater, Colo.: 

Sanatoria (2) 18 

Edward Sanatorium (111.) 23 

Egg Harbor City, N. J.: 

Association 168 

Elgin, 111.: 

Insane Hospital 72 

Elizabeth, N. J.: 

Association 168 

Dispensary 104 

Legislation 239 

Elkins, W.Va.: 

Association 193 

Elks, Benevolent and Protective Order 

of, Sanatorium (D. C.) 21 

EUenville, N. Y.: 

Association 174 

Ellicottville, N. Y.: 

Association 174 

Ebiiira, N. Y.: 

Legislation 242 

Sanatorium 45 

Eloise, Mich.: 

Sanatorium 35 

El Paso, Tex.: 

Dispensary 126 

Sanatoria (2) 65 

El Reposo Sanatorium (Cal.) 15 

Emanuel Church Class (Mass.) 99 

Emporium, Pa.: 

Dispensary 115 

Englewood, N. J.: 

Association 168 

Episcopal City Mission Home (Pa.) .... 60 
Erie, Pa.: 

Association 185 

Dispensary 115 

Legislation 247 

Erie County (N. Y.) Hospital 45 

Escanaba, Mich.: 

Association 160 

Esse.x County, N. J.: 

Sanatorium 40 

Estevan, Sask. : 

Association 294 

Eudowood Sanatorium (Md.) 29 

Evanston, 111.: 

Association 148 

Evansville, Ind.: 

Association 149 

Dispensary 96 

Legislation 225 

Sanatorium 24 



PAGE 

Everett, Mass.: 

Association 156 

Legislation 232 

Everett, Pa.: 

Dispensary 115 

Everett, Wash.: 

Association 193 

Evergreen Lodge (N. Y.) 51 



Fairfax, Cal.: 

Sanatorium 14 

Fairfield, Me.: 

Sanatorium 28 

Fairfield County, Conn. : 

Association 146 

Sanatorium 19 

Fairmont, W. Va.: 

Association 193 

Fall River, Mass.: 

Association 157 

Legislation 232 

Sanatorium 32 

Falls Village, Conn. : 

Sanatorium 19 

Faribault, Minn.: 

Association 164 

Insane Hospital 75 

Farmingdale, N. J.: 

Sanatorium 40 

Farnhurst, Del.: 

Insane Hospital 72 

Fayette County, Ky.: 

Association 152 

Fayetteville, N. Y.: 

Association 174 

Fayetteville, N. C: 

Association 182 

Federation of Labor Pavilion (N. Y.) ... 44 

Fellowship Sanatorium (N. C.) 54 

Fergus Falls, Minn. : 

Association 164 

Fern Cliff Sanatorium (Pa.) 61 

Fern Hill Sanatorium (Colo.) x8 

Ferry Boat Middletown Day Camp 

(N.Y.) 47 

Ferry Boat Southfield Day Camp (N. Y.) 47 
Ferry Boat Susquehanna Day Camp 

(N. Y.) 49 

Ferry Boat Westfield Day Camp (N. Y.) 47 
Fitchburg, Mass.: 

.'Association 157 

Dispensary 100 

Legislation 232 

Flat Rock, N. C: 

Sanatorium 54 

Fleming, Sask.: 

Association 294 



310 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Flint, Mich.: 

Association i6i 

Florence, Ariz.: 

Penal Institution 83 

Florida: 

Association 147 

Legislation 223 

Sanatoria (2) 21 

Flower Hospital Clinic (N. Y.) 106 

Flower Mission Pavilion for Incurables 

(Ind.) 25 

Fonda, N. Y.: 

Association 1 74 

Fond Du Lac, Wis. : 

Association 194 

Foresters' Sanatorium (Conn.) 19 

Foresters', Independent Order of, Sana- 
torium (N. Y.) 50 

Forney Sanatorium (Pa.) 60 

Fort Apache Tubercular Camp (Ari- 
zona) 13 

Fort Bayard, N. Mex.: 

Sanatorium 42 

Fort Dodge, la.: 

Sanatorium 26 

Fort Lapwai, Idaho: 

Sanatorium 22 

Fort Plain, N. Y.: 

Association 175 

Fort Smith, Ark.: 

Association 143 

Fort Stanton, N. Mex.: 

Sanatorium 42 

Fort Wayne, Ind.: 

Association 149 

Legislation 226 

Sanatorium 24 

Framingham, Mass.: 

Association 159 

Dispensary loi 

Frankenmuth, Mich.: 

Association 161 

Frankford, Pa.: 

Dispensary 115 

Frankfort, Ind. : 

Sanatorium 24 

Franklin, Pa.: 

Dispensary 115 

Franklin County (Ohio) Hospital 56 

Franklin Open Window Room (111.) .... 133 
Franklinton, Pa.: 

Association 153 

Frederick, Md.: 

Association 155 

Fredericton, N. B.: 

Association 289 

Freedmen's Hospital Clinic (D. C.) 94 

Freeport, N. Y.: 

Association 175 



PAGE 

Fremont, Mich.: 

Association 161 

Fruitvale School (Cal.) 131 

Fulton, Mo.: 

Insane Hospital 76 

Fulton, N. Y.: 

Association 175 

Fulton County (N. Y.) Hospital 45 

Gabriels Sanatorium (N. Y.) 45 

Gads Hill Dispensary (III.) 95 

Gallatin, Tenn.: 

Association 191 

Gait, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Galveston, Tex. : 

Legislation 252 

Gardner, Mass.: 

Association 157 

Dispensary 100 

Garyville, La. : 

Association 153 

Gasconade County (Mo.) Association. . . 166 

Gaylord Farm Sanatorium (Conn.) 20 

Genesee County (N. Y.) Association 172 

Geneva, N. Y.: 

Associations (2) 175 

Georgetown, Del. : 

Dispensary 93 

Georgetown, Ky.: 

Association 151 

Dispensary 97 

Georgetown University Hospital Clinic 

(D.C.) 95 

Georgia: 

Associations* (6) 147 

Dispensaries (2) 95 

Insane Hospital 72 

Legislation 223 

Penal Institutions (2) 84 

Sanatoria (7) 21 

German Hospital Clinic (N. Y.) 106 

Gettysburg, Pa.: 

Dispensary 115 

Glace Bay, N. S.: 

Association 290 

Gladstone, Minn.: 

Sanatorium 37 

Glassboro, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Glenellis Sanatorium (Me.) 28 

Glen Gardner, N. J.: 

Sanatorium 39 

Glens FaUs, N. Y.: 

Association 175 

Glockner Sanatorium (Colo.) 16 

Gloversville.N.Y.: 

Association 175 



311 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Goldsboro, N. C: 

Insane Hospital 78 

Good Samaritan Clinic (N. Y.) 106 

Gouvcmeur Hospital Clinic (N. Y.) .... 106 
Gowanda, N. Y.: 

Association 175 

Insane Hospital 77 

Graham Open Window School (111.) .... 133 
Grand Haven, Mich.: 

Association 161 

Grand Rapids, Mich.: 

Association 161 

Dispensary 102 

Legislation 234 

Sanatorium 35 

Grand View Sanatorium (Pa.) 60 

Grandview Sanatorium (Tenn.) 65 

Grasraere, N. H.: 

Sanatorium 39 

Gravenhurst, Ont.: 

Sanatoria (3) 285 

Great Barrington, Mass.: 

Association 157 

Greenbank, Del.: 

Penal Institution 84 

Green Bay, Wis.: 

Penal Institution 88 

Greene Coimty (Mo.) Association 166 

Greensboro, N. C: 

Association 182 

Greensburg, La.: 

Association 153 

Greensburg, Pa.: 

Dispensary 115 

Greenwich, Conn.: 

Sanatorium 19 

Grenfell, Sask.: 

Association 294 

Griffith Hospital (S. C.) 87 

Grove, The (N. J.) 40 

Guelph, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Guilford County (N. C.) Association . . . 182 
Guthrie, Okla.: 

Association 184 

Guysboro County (N. S.) Association. . . 290 



Hackensack, N. J. : 

Association 169 

Sanatorium 40 

Ilagerstown, Md.: 

Association 155 

Hahnemann Hospital Dispensary (111.). . 95 
Haines, Alaska: 

Sanatorium 12 

Halifax, N. S.: 

Association 290 

Halliday Cottage (N. Y.) 46 



Hamburg, Pa.: 

Sanatorium 59 

Hamilton, Ohio: 

Legislation 246 

Hamilton, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Dispensary 287 

Sanatoria (2) 285 

Hamline Open Window Room (111.) .... 133 

Hammond, La.: 

Sanatorium 27 

Hammonton, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Hancock, Mich.: 

Dispensary 102 

Hanley, Sask.: 

Association 294 

Hanover, Pa.: 

Dispensary 115 

Hanwood Home (Ariz.) 12 

Harlem Hospital Clinic (N. Y.) 107 

Harrington, Del.: 

Dispensary 93 

Harrisburg, Pa.: 

Association 186 

Dispensary 116 

Insane Hospital 78 

Legislation 248 

Hartford, Conn.: 

Associations (2) 145 

Dispensaiy 93 

Legislation 221 

Open Air School 132 

Sanatoria (4) 18 

Hartford County (Conn.) Sanatorium . . 18 

Hastings, Mich. : 

Association 161 

Hastings, Pa.: 

Dispensary 116 

Haverhill, Mass.: 

Association 157 

Dispensaries (2) 100 

Legislation 232 

Hawaii : 

Association 148 

Sanatorium 22 

Hawthorne, INIass.: 

Insane Hospital 74 

Hazelwood Sanatorium (Ky.) 27 

Hazleton, Pa.: 

Association 186 

Dispensary 116 

Open Air School 137 

Healthmore Camp (N. Y.) 53 

Heather Club Pa\iHon (Ont.) 285 

Hebron, Me.: 

Association 154 

Sanatorium 28 

Heidelberg Sanatorium (N. C.) 54 



312 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Heliotrope Open Air School (Cal.) 131 

Henderson, Ky.: 

Association 151 

Dispensary 97 

Sanatorium 26 

Henderson ville, N. C: 

Association 182 

Sanatoria (2) 54 

Henry, Walter H., Memorial Sanatorium 

(Wash.) 67 

Herkimer, N. Y. : 

Association 175 

Highland Park Sanatorium (Cal.) 14 

Highlands Camp Sanatoriima (N. C.) ... 55 

Hillcrest Cottage (N. Y.) 51 

Hill Crest Sanatorium (N. J.) 40 

Hillcroft Sanatorium (Mass.) SS 

Hillsborough County (N. H.) Hospital . . 39 
Hillsdale, Mich. : 

Association 161 

Hill'sGrove, R. I.: 

Sanatorium 63 

Hinton, W. Va.: 

Association 193 

Hoboken, N. J.: 

Legislation 239 

Holdrege, Neb. : 

Association 167 

Holland, Mich.: 

Association 161 

HoUy, Mich.: 

Association 161 

Holy Ghost Hospital (Mass.) 31 

Holyoke, Mass.: 

Association 157 

Legislation 232 

Sanatoria (2) 32 

Homan Sanatorium (Tex.) 65 

Home, The (Colo.) . 17 

Home Cottage (Va.) 66 

Home for Incurables (Ga.) 22 

Home for Incurables (T. H.) 22 

Home for Incurables (111.) 23 

Home for Incurables (N. Y.) 47 

Homer, La.: 

Association 153 

Homestead, Pa.: 

Dispensary 116 

Honesdale, Pa.: 

Dispensary 116 

Honolulu, T.H.: 

Association 148 

Sanatorium 22 

Hope Farm (Del.) 20 

Hopewell Hospital (Minn.) 37 

Hopkins, Joluis, Hospital Dispensary 

(Md.) 99 

Hopkinsville, Ky.: 

Insane Hospital 74 



PAGE 

Homell, N. Y.: 

Association 175 

Hospital, III.: 

Insane Hospital 73 

Hospitals II 

Hot Springs, S. D.: 

Sanatorium 64 

Houghton, Mich.: 

Association 161 

Sanatorium 35 

Houghton County (Mich.) Dispensary. . 102 

House of Rest (N. Y.) 47 

House of the Good Samaritan (Mass.) . . 31 
Houston, Tex.: 

Legislation 252 

Howard, R. I.: 

Sanatorium 63 

Howard County (Mo.) Association 165 

Howell, Mich.: 

Association 161 

Sanatorium 35 

Hudson, Mass. : 

Association 157 

Hudson, N.Y.: 

Association 175 

Hudson County, N. J. : 

Association 169 

Sanatorium 41 

Hudson Falls, N. Y.: 

Association 176 

Hudson River State Hospital (N. Y.) ... 77 
Huntingdon, Pa.: 

Dispensary 116 

Huntress House (Mass.) 34 

Huntsville, Tex.: 

Penal Institution 87 

Hygeia Camp (La.) 27 

Idaho : 

Legislation 224 

Sanatorium 22 

Illinois : 

Associations* (10) 148 

Dispensaries (13) 95 

Insane Hospitals (5) 72 

Legislation 224 

Open Air Schools (6) 132 

Penal Institutions (2) 84 

Sanatoria (11) 23 

Indiana: 

Associations* (8) 149 

Dispensaries (2) 96 

Insane Hospital . , 73 

Legislation 225 

Penal Institution 85 

Sanatoria (9) 24 

Indiana, Pa. : 

Dispensary 116 



313 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Indianapolis, Ind.: 

Dispensary 96 

Legislation 226 

Sanatoria (2) 25 

Indian Head, Sask.: 

Association . 294 

Indians, Sanatoria for, 12, 13, 22, 42, 58 

Ingham County (Mich.) Association. . . . 162 

Insane Hospitals 71 

Inverness, N. S.: 

Association 290 

lola Sanatorium (N. Y.) 51 

Ionia, Mich.: 

Association 161 

Penal Institution 85 

Sanatorium 36 

Iowa: 

Associations* (6) 150 

Dispensary 97 

Insane Hospitals (3) 73 

Legislation 226 

Penal Institution 85 

Sanatoria (6) 25 

Iredell County (N. C.) Association 182 

Iroquois Memorial Dispensary (111.) .... 96 

Italian Clinic (N. Y.) 107 

Ithaca, N. Y.: 

Association 176 



Jackson, La.: 

Insane Hospital 74 

Jackson, Mich.: 

Association 162 

Jackson County (Mo.) Association 166 

Jackson County (Okla.) Association. ... 184 

Jackson School (Pa.) 137 

Jacksonville, Fla.: 

Association 147 

Legislation 223 

Jacksonville, 111.: 

Association 148 

Insane Hospital 73 

Jamestown, N. Y.: 

Association 176 

Dispensary 106 

Jamestown, R. I.: 

Association 188 

Jeflferson City, Mo.: 

Penal Institution 86 

Jefferson County, Ala.: 

Association 142 

Dispensary 91 

Sanatorium 11 

Jefferson County (Ark.) Association .... 143 

Jefferson County (la.) Hospital 26 

Jefferson County (N. Y.) Hospital 45 

Jefferson County (Ohio) Hospital 57 



Jefferson Medical College Dispensary 

(Pa.) 119 

Jeffersonville, Ind.: 

Penal Institution 85 

Jenkintown, Pa.: 

Dispensary 116 

Jersey City, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Dispensary 104 

Jewish Consumptives Dispensary 119 

Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society 

Sanatorium (Colo.) 18 

Jewish Home for Consumptives of Balti- 
more City (Md.) 29 

Jewish Home for Incurables (Mo.) 38 

Jewish Hospital Dispensary (Mo.) 103 

Jewish Hospital for Consumptives 

(Colo.) 17 

Jewish, Philadelphia, Sanatorium (Pa.) . 59 

Jolms Hopkins Hospital Dispensary 

(Md.) 99 

Johnston County (N. C.) Association. . . 182 

Johnstown, Pa.: 

Dispensary 116 

Legislation 248 

Joliet, 111.: 

Penal Institution 84 



Kalamazoo, Mich.: 

Association 162 

Insane Hospital 75 

Legislation 234 

Sanatorium •. . . 36 

Kamloops, B. C: 

Sanatorium 284 

Kanawha County, W. Va.: 

Association 193 

Dispensary 127 

Kane, Pa.: 

Dispensary 116 

Kankakee State Hospital (111.) 73 

Kansas: 

Associations* (2) 151 

Dispensary 97 

Insane Hospitals (2) 74 

Legislation 227 

Sanatoria (4) 26 

Kansas City, Kans.: 

Legislation 227 

Kansas City, Mo.: 

Association 166 

Dispensary 103 

Legislation 236 

Sanatoria (2) 38 

Kaspare Cohn Hospital and Training 

School (Cal.) 14 

Kaukauna, Wis.: 

Association 194 



314 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Kendall, N. Y.: 

Association 176 

Kenosha, Wis.: 

Association 19S 

Kensington Dispensary (Pa.) 119 

Kentucky: 

Associations* (10) 151 

Dispensaries (5) 97 

Insane Hospitals (2) 74 

Legislation 227 

Penal Institution 85 

Sanatoria (5) 26 

Kentville, N. S.: 

Sanatorium 284 

Keyser, W. Va.: 

Association 194 

King County (Ont.) Association 293 

King County, Wash.: 

Association 193 

Sanatorium 67 

King Edward Sanatorium (B. C.) 284 

King Edward Sanatorium (Ont.) 285 

Kings County (N. Y.) Hospital 49 

King's Daughters' Home for Incurables 

(Cal.) 14 

Kings Park, L. I.: 

Insane Hospital 77 

Kingston, N. Y. : 

Association 176 

Dispensary 106 

Sanatorium 46 

Kittanning, Pa. : 

Dispensary 117 

Kleeman Memorial Camp (Ohio) 57 

Knoxville, Tenn.: 

Association 191 

Legislation 251 

Koch, Robert, Hospital (Mo.) 38 



Labor, Central Federation of. Pavilion 

(N. Y.) 44 

Labor, Rome Federation of. Pavilion 

(N.Y.) 51 

Labor Union, Brooklyn Central, Sana- 
torium, (N. Y.) 49 

La Crosse, Wis.: 

Association 195 

Legislation 225 

Lady Grey Hospital (Ont.) 285 

Lafayette, Ind.: 

Association 149 

Lafayette, La.: 

Association 153 

Laguna, N. Mex.: 

Sanatorium 42 

La Junta, Colo. : 

Sanatorium 18 



Lake County, 111.: 

Institute 149 

Sanatorium 24 

Lake County (Minn.) Association 165 

Lake Edward, Que.: 

Sanatorium 286 

Lake George, N. Y.: 

Association 176 

Lake Kushaqua, N. Y. : 

Sanatorium 46 

Lakeland, Ky.: 

Insane Hospital 74 

Lake View Pavilion (Conn.) 19 

Lakeview Sanatorium (N. Y.) 52 

Lakeville State Tuberculosis Hospital 

(Mass.) 29 

Lakewood, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Lancaster, Pa.: 

Association 186 

Dispensary 117 

Lansford, Pa.: 

Dispensary 117 

Lansing, Mich.: 

Association 162 

Lapwai, Idaho: 

Sanatorium 22 

Lare's, Mrs., Tent Sanatorium (Colo.) . 17 
Las Animas, Colo. : 

Sanatorium 18 

Lassiter, Va. : 

Penal Institution 87 

Latane, S. P. Association (Va.) 192 

Latonia, Ky.: 

Association 152 

Laurentian Sanatorium (Que.) 286 

La Vina Sanatorium (Cal.) 14 

Lawrence, Mass.: 

Association 157 

Legislation 232 

Sanatoria (2) 32 

Laws, Typical 257 

Leahi Home (T. H.) 22 

Leavenworth, Kans.: 

Association 151 

Lebanon, Pa.: 

Dispensary 117 

Lebanon Hospital Dispensary (Pa.) .... 120 
Legislation Relative to Tuberculosis .... 217 
Leonardsville, N. Y.: 

Association 176 

LeRoy, N. Y.: 

Association 176 

Lewes, Del.: 

Dispensary 93 

Lewis Coxmty (N. Y.) : 

Association 177 

Lewiston, Me.: 

Association 154 



31S 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Le^istowTi, Pa.: 

Dispensary 117 

Lexington, Ky. : 

Association 152 

Dispensary 97 

Legislation . . .' 228 

Liberty, N. Y.: 

Sanatoria (8) 46 

Lima, Ohio: 

Association 184 

Sanatorium 57 

Lincoln, Neb.: 

Legislation 237 

Lincoln, N. Me.x. : 

Sanatorium 42 

Lincoln County (Ky.) Association 152 

Lincoln House Dispensary (Mass.) 99 

Liritz, Pa.: 

Sanatorium 60 

Little Compton, R. I.: 

Association 188 

Little Falls, N.Y.: 

Association 176 

Little Rock, Ark.: 

Legislation 219 

Little Valley, N. Y.: 

Association 176 

Llano, Tex.: 

Sanatorium 65 

Lock Haven, Pa. : 

Dispensary 117 

Lockport, N. Y.: 

Association 177 

Loeb, Matilda, H., Dispensary (Pa.) .... 1 20 

Logan County (Okla.) Association 184 

Logansport, Ind.: 

Insane Hospital 73 

London, Ont.: 

Association 291 

Sanatorium 285 

Long Beach . Cal. : 

Association 143 

Long Island College Dispensary (N. Y.) 109 

Long Island Hospital (Mass.) 31 

Loomis Sanatorium (N. Y.) 46 

Lorain County (Ohio) Hospital 57 

Los Angeles, Cal.: 

Association 144 

Dispensary 92 

Legislation 220 

Sanatoria (4) 14 

Louisburg, N. S.: 

Association 290 

Louisiana: 

Associations* (15) 152 

Dispensary 98 

Insane Hospital 74 

Legislation 228 

Open Air Schools (2) 133 

Sanatoria (5) 27 



PAGE 

Louisville, Ky.: 

Association 152 

Dispensary 97 

Legislation 228 

Sanatoria (3) 27 

Lowell, Mass.: 

Legislation 232 

Sanatorium 33 

Lovvville, N. Y.: 

Association 177 

Lucas County (Ohio) Sanatorium 57 

Ludington, Mich. : 

Association 162 

Lumsden, Sask.: 

Association 294 

Lunenburg, Mass.: 

Sanatorium 33 

Lutheran, Evangelical, Sanatorium 

(Colo.) 18 

Lycoming Count}' (Pa.) Association .... 187 

Lykens, Pa.: 

Dispensary 117 

LjTichburg, Va.: 

Association 192 

Dispensary 126 

Lynn, Mass.: 

Association 157 

Dispensary loi 

Legislation 233 

Sanatorium 33 



McCall School (Pa.) 137 

McCormellsburg, Pa.: 

Dispensary 117 

McCormick, Elizabeth, Open Air 

Schools (111.) 132 

McCreight Sanatorium (Mass.) 31 

McDonagh School (La.) 133 

McGehee's, Dr., Cottage Colony (La.) . . 27 

McKeesport, Pa.: 

Dispensary 117 

Legislation 248 

Macon, Ga.: 

Association 147 

Madison, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Madison, Wis. : 

Association 195 

Dispensary 127 

Madison County (Ohio) Hospital 57 

Mahoning County, Ohio: 

Hospital 55 

Infirmary 58 

Maine: 

Associations* (4) 154 

Dispensaries (5) 98 

Insane Hospital 74 

Legislation 229 

Sanatoria (4) 28 



ii6 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Maiden, Mass. : 

Association 158 

Dispensary loi 

Legislation 233 

Malone, N. Y.: 

Association 177 

Manchester, N. H. : 

Legislation 238 

Manhattan State Hospital (N. Y.) 77 

Manila, P. I.: 

Association 187 

Dispensary 124 

Legislation 249 

Penal Institution 87 

Sanatoria (2) 62 

Manistee, Mich.: 

Association 162 

Manistique, Mich.: 

Association 162 

Manitoba: 

Association 288 

Sanatoria (2) 284 

Maukato, Minn.: 

Association 164 

Mannington, W. Va.: 

Association 194 

Maple Lodge Sanatorium (Mass.) 34 

Maricopa County (Ariz.) Association. . . 142 

Maricopa Hospital (Ariz.) 12 

Marion, Va.: 

Insane Hospital 79 

Marquette, Mich. : 

Sanatorium 36 

Marquette College Dispensary (Wis.) ... 127 

Marquis Cottage (N. Y.) 51 

Marshall, Mich. : 

Association 162 

MarshaUton, Del.:- 

Sanatorium 20 

Marshalsea, Pa.: 

Sanatorium 60 

Martinsburg, W. Va.: 

Association 194 

Martyn Sanatorium (Cal.) 15 

Maryland: 

Associations* (9) 154 

Dispensaries (4) 98 

Legislation 229 

Sanatoria (6) 28 

Mason City, la.: 

Association 151 

Massachusetts: 

Associations* (38) 155 

Dispensaries (30) 99 

Insane Hospitals (6) 74 

Legislation 230 

Open Air Schools (6) 133 

Penal Institutions (2) 85 

Sanatoria (48) 29 



Massena, N. Y.: 

Association 177 

Mauch Chunk, Pa.: 

Dispensary 117 

May Court Club Dispensary (Ont.) .... 287 

Mecklenberg County (N. C.) Associa- 
tion 181 

Medfield, Mass.: 

Insane Hospital 75 

Medford, Mass.: 

Association 158 

Melrose, Mass.: 

Association 158 

Memorial Hospital (N. J.) 40 

Memphis, Tenn.: 

Legislation 251 

Sanatorium 64 

Mendocino State Plospital (Cal.) 72 

Mennonite Sanatorium (Colo.) 18 

Menomonie, Wis. : 

Association 19S 

Men tone Sanatorium (Cal.) 15 

Mercer County, Ohio: 

Association .'. 183 

Sanatorium 57 

Meriden, Conn.: 

Association 146 

Sanatorium 19 

Meridian, Miss.: 

Insane Hospital 76 

Merrill, Wis. : 

Association 195 

Metropohtan Cottage (N. Y.) 46 

Metropolitan Hospital (N. Y.) 47 

Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.'s Sanatoriiun 

(N. Y.) 47 

Meyersdale, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Miami County (Ohio) Hospital 57 

Miami Valley Hospital (Ohio) 56 

Michigan: 

Associations* (47) 159 

Dispensaries (5) 102 

Insane Hospitals (3) 75 

Legislation 234 

Penal Institution 85 

Sanatoria (12) 35 

Middleboro, Mass.: 

Sanatorium 29 

Middlesex Association (Conn.) 146 

Middlesex Camp (Conn.) 19 

Middletown, Conn.: 

Association 146 

Insane Hospital 72 

Sanatorimn 19 

Middletown, N. Y.: 

Association i77 

Dispensary 106 



317 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Middletown, R. I.: 

Association i88 

Middletown Day Canap Open Air School 

(N. Y.) 136 

Middletown Ferry Boat Day Camp 

(N. Y.) 47 

MiddleviUe, N. Y.: 

Association i77 

Miflainsburg, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Mifflintown, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Milestone, Sask.: 

Association 294 

Milford, Del.: 

Dispensary 94 

MUford, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Military Home (Ohio) 56 

Milledgeville, Ga.: 

Insane Hospital 72 

Penal Institution 84 

Millet Sanatorium (Mass.) 32 

Millville, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Milton, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Milwaukee, Wis.: 

Associations (3) 19S 

Dispensaries (4) ^27 

Insane Hospital 80 

Legislation 255 

Sanatoria (3) 68 

Milwaukee Heights, Ore.: 

Sanatoria (2) 58 

Minneapolis, Minn.: 

Association 164 

Dispensaries (2) 102 

Legislation 235 

Sanatoria (3) 37 

Minnequa Hospital Dispensary (Colo- 
rado) 92 

Minnesota: 

Associations* (18) 163 

Dispensaries (4) 102 

Insane Hospitals (2) 75 

Legislation 235 

Open Air School i34 

Penal Institutions (2) 86 

Sanatoria (9) 36 

Minnewaska,The (Ont.) 285 

Minor Cottages (N. C.) 54 

Mississippi : 

Insane Hospitals (2) 76 

Legislation 235 

Missouri: 

Associations* (12) 165 

Dispensaries (13) 103 

Insane Hospitals (2) 76 



Legislation 236 

Penal Institution 86 

Sanatoria (8) 37 

Monadnock, N. H.: 

Association 167 

Moncton, N. B.: 

Association 289 

Monessen, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Moniteau County (Mo.) Association ... 165 
Monongahela, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Monroe County (N. Y.) Hospital 46 

Monrovia, Cal.: 

Association i44 

Open Air School 131 

Sanatorium 14 

Mont Alto, Pa.: 

Sanatoria (2) 59. 60 

Montana: 

Association* 166 

Legislation 237 

Sanatorium 38 

Montclair, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Dispensary 104 

Open Air School i34 

Montefiore County Sanatorium (N. Y.) 44 

Montefiore Home (N. Y.) 48 

Montgomery, Ala.: 

Association 142 

Dispensary 9^ 

Legislation 219 

Montgomery Coimty (Md.) Association . 155 
Montgomery County (N. Y.) Hospital . . 47 
Montgomery County (Ohio) Hospital . . 56 
Montreal, Que.: 

Association 293 

Dispensary 287 

Sanatorium 286 

Montrose, N. C: 

Sanatorium S3 

Montrose, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Moorestown, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Moosejaw, Sask.: 

Association 294 

Moosomin, Sask.: 

Association 294 

Morgagni CHnic (N. Y.) 107 

Morganton, N. C: 

Insane Hospital 78 

Morristown, N. J. : 

Association 169 

Dispensary 104 

Morse's, Dr., Sanatorium (N. C.) 54 

Morton, Pa.: 

Sanatorium 60 



318 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Moseley Open Window Room (III.) 133 

Moss, Lucien, Home (Pa.) 60 

Mountain Sanatorium (N. Y.) 44 

Mountain Sanatorium (Ont.) 285 

Mountain Side Hospital Dispensary 

(N.J.) 104 

Mountain View Sanatorium (N. Y.) .... 50 
Mount Airy, Pa. : 

Open Air School 137 

Mount Carmel, Pa.: 

Dispensary 118 

Mount Holly, N. J.: 

Association 169 

Mount McGregor, N. Y. : 

Sanatorium 47 

Mt. Pleasant, la. : 

Insane Hospital 73 

Mt. Pleasant, Pa.: 

Dispensary 119 

Mount St. Michael's Sanatorium (Pa.) . . 61 

Mount St. Rose Hospital (Mo.) 38 

Mount Sinai Class (Mass.) 100 

Mount Sinai Clinic(N. Y.) 107 

Mount Vernon, Ala.: 

Insane Hospital 71 

Mount Vernon, Mo.: 

Sanatorium 37 

Mount Vernon, N. Y.: 

Legislation 242 

Mount Vernon, Ohio: 

Sanatorium 55 

Mower County (Minn.) Association .... 163 

Mulanphy Hospital Dispensary (Mo.) . . 103 

Multnomah County (Ore.) Hospital .... 58 
Muncie, Ind.: 

Association 150 

Municipal Ordinances 275 

Muskegon, Mich.: 

Association 162 

Muskoka Cottage Sanatorium (Ont.) . . . 285 

Muskoka Free Hospital (Ont.) 285 

Nanticoke, Pa.: 

Dispensary 119 

Naperville, 111.: 

Sanatorium 23 

Naples, N.Y.: 

Association 177 

Nashville, Tenn.: 

Association 191 

Dispensary 125 

Legislation 251 

Sanatorium 64 

National Association 141 

National Home for Disabled Volunteer 

Soldiers (Cal.) 15 

National Home for Disabled Volunteer 

Soldiers (Tenn.) 64 



National Plome for Volunteer Soldiers 

(S. D.) _ .._. 64 

National Homeopathic Hospital Clinic 

(D. C.) 95 

National Legislation 218 

National Military Home (Ohio) 56 

National Soldiers' Home (Tenn) 64 

Neal Cottage (N. Y.) 51 

Nebraska: 

Associations* (4) 167 

Legislation 237 

Sanatoria* (2) 39 

Needles Cottage Sanatorium (Cal.) 14 

Nevada : 

Legislation 237 

Nevada, Mo.: 

Insane Hospitals 76 

Neversink Mountain Sanatorium (Penn- 
sylvania) 61 

Newark, N. J. : 

Associations (2) 170 

Dispensary 105 

Legislation 239 

Open Air School 134 

Sanatoria (4) 40 

New Bedford, Mass.: 

Association 158 

Dispensary loi 

Legislation 233 

Sanatorium 33 

Newberry, S. C: 

Association 190 

New Bloomfield, Pa.: 

Dispensary 119 

New Britain, Conn.: 

Association 146 

New Brunswick: 

Associations (4) 289 

Dispensary 286 

New Brunswick, N. J.: 

Association 1 70 

Newburgh, N. Y. : 

Association 177 

Sanatorium 47 

Newburyport, Mass.: 

Association 158 

Dispensary loi 

New Canaan, Conn. : 

Sanatorium 20 

New Castle, Pa.: 

Dispensary 119 

New Castle County, Del. : 

Dispensary 94 

Workhouse 84 

New Hampshire : 

Associations* (2) 167 

Dispensary 104 

Legislation 238 

Sanatoria (3) 39 



319 



INDEX 



PAGE 

New Haven, Conn.: 

Association 146 

Dispensary 93 

Legislation 222 

Sanatoria (2) 20 

New Haven County, Conn.: 

Association 146 

Sanatorium 19 

New Jersey: 

Associations* (34) 168 

Dispensaries (10) 104 

Insane Hospitals (2) 76 

Legislation 238 

Open Air Schools (4) i34 

Penal Institution 86 

Sanatoria (15) 39 

New London, Mo.: 

Association 166 

New Mexico: 

Association* 171 

Legislation 240 

Penal Institution 86 

Sanatoria (15) 41 

New Mexico Cottage Sanatorium (N.Mex.) 43 
New Orleans, La.: 

Association 152 

Dispensary 98 

Legislation 228 

Open Air Schools (2) 133 

Sanatoria (2) 27 

Newport, R. I.: 

Association 188 

Newport, Tenn.: 

Sanatorium 64 

New Shoreham, R. I.: 

Association 188 

Newton, Mass.: 

Legislation 233 

Newton Lower Falls, Mass.: 

Sanatorium 33 

New York: 

Associations* (104) 171 

Dispensaries (53) 105 

Insane Hospitals (11) 77 

Legislation 240 

Open Air Schools (30) 134 

Penal Institution 86 

Sanatoria (85) 43 

New York City: 

Associations (5) i77 

Dispensaries (32) 106 

Insane Hospital 77 

Legislation 242 

Open Air Schools (26) 13S 

Sanatoria (23) 47 

Niagara County (N. Y.) Hospital 49 

Niagara Falls, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Dispensary 109 



Ninette, Man.: 

Sanatorium 284 

Nordrach Ranch Sanatorium (Colo.) ... 17 

Norfolk, Va.: 

Association 192 

Dispensary 126 

Legislation 253 

Sanatoria (2) 66 

Norristown, Pa.: 

Dispensary 119 

Insane Hospital 79 

Northampton, Mass.: 

Association 158 

North CaroHna: 

Associations* (12) 181 

Dispensaries (2) no 

Insane Hospitals (2) 78 

Legislation 244 

Sanatoria (14) S3 

North Dakota: 

Association* 182 

Legislation 244 

Sanatorium 55 

North Kingston, R. I. : 

Association 189 

North Platte, Neb.: 

Association 167 

North Reading State Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital (Mass.) 29 

North Sydney, N.S.: 

Association 290 

North Vineland, N. J.: 

Sanatorium 4° 

Norwalk, Conn.: 

Association 146 

Norwood, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Notification Laws 257 

Nova Scotia: 

Associations (18) 289 

Sanatorium 284 

Nyack, N. Y.: 

Association 178 



Oakdale, la.: 

Sanatorium 

Oak Forest, 111.: 

Sanatorium 

Oakland, Cal.: 

Association 

Dispensary 

Legislation 

Open Air School 

Sanatorium 

Oak Mount Sanatorium (N. Y.) , 
O'Fallon Dispensary (Mo.) .... 



25 
23 

144 
92 

220 

131 
14 
45 

103 



320 



INDEX 



Ogdensburg, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Insane Hospital 77 

Ohio: 

Associations* (13) 183 

Dispensaries (9) 1 1 1 

Insane Hospitals (2) 78 

Legislation 244 

Open Air Schools (3) 137 

Penal Institution 87 

Sanatoria (23) 55 

Ohio County, W. Va. : 

Association 194 

Infirmary 68 

Sanatorium 68 

Oil City, Pa.: 

Dispensary 119 

Sanatorium 60 

Okahumpka, Fla. : 

Sanatorium 21 

Oklahoma: 

Associations* (5) 184 

Legislation 246 

Sanatorium 58 

Oklahoma City, Okla. : 

Associations (2) 184 

Legislation 246 

Sanatorium 58 

Olean, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Dispensary 109 

Omaha, Neb.: 

Associations (2) 167 

Legislation 237 

Sanatorium 39 

Oneida, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Oneida County (Wis.) Association 195 

Onondaga County (N. Y.) Hospital .... 50 

Ontario: 

Associations (18) 291 

Dispensaries (4) 287 

Sanatoria (11) 285 

Ontario County, N. Y.: 

Association 175 

Sanatorium 45 

Open Air Schools 131 

Orange, N. J.: 

Association 1 70 

Dispensary 105 

Legislation 239 

Open Air Schools (2) 134 

Sanatoria (2) 40 

Oregon : 

Associations* (2) 185 

Dispensary 112 

Legislation 246 

Sanatoria (4) 58 

Orleans County (N. Y.) Association .... 171 



Osawatomie, Kans.: 

Insane Hospital 74 

Oshkosh, Wis.: 

Legislation 256 

Oswego, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Oswego County (N. Y.) Hospital 50 

Otisville Sanatorium (N. Y.) 50 

Ottawa, 111.: 

Sanatorium 23 

Ottawa, Ont.: 

Association 292 

Dispensary 287 

Sanatorium 285 

Ouchterlony Hospital (Ky.) 27 

Owego, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Owensboro, Ky. : 

Association 152 

Dispensary 97 

Owen Sound, Ont.: 

Association 292 

Owensville, Mo.: 

Association 166 

Owosso, Mich.: 

Association 162 

Oxford, Pa.: 

Association 186 



Paducah, Ky.: 

Association 152 

Sanatorium 27 

Palmyra, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Pamsetgaaf , Among the Pines (Ariz.) ... 12 

Pan Handle Association (W. Va.) 194 

Parkersburg, W. Va.: 

Association 194 

Park Region Association (Minn.) 164 

Pasadena, Cal.: 

Association 144 

Legislation 220 

Sanatoria (2) 14 

Passaic, N. J.: 

Legislation 240 

Sanatorium 41 

Paterson, N. J.: 

Association 170 

Dispensary 105 

Legislation 240 

Sanatorium 41 

Patterson, La.: 

Association 153 

Patton, Cal.: 

Insane Hospital 71 

Paw Paw, Mich.: 

Association 162 



321 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Pawtucket, R. I.: 

Association 189 

Dispensaries (2) 125 

Legislation 250 

Open Air School 138 

Pawtuxet \'allej^ (R. I.) Association .... 189 

Pembroke, Ont.: 

Association 292 

Pembroke Sanatorium (N. H.) 39 

Penal Institutions 83 

Pennsylvania : 

Associations* (19) 185 

Dispensaries (124) 112 

Insane Hospitals (5) 78 

Legislation 247 

Open Air Schools (6) 137 

Sanatoria (25) 59 

Peoria, 111.: 

Association 149 

Dispensary 96 

Insane Hospital 73 

Legislation 225 

Perth Amboy, N. J.: 

Association 170 

Legislation 240 

Petersburg, Va.: 

Association 192 

Insane Hospital 79 

Sanatorium 67 

Petoskey, Mich.: 

Association 162 

Phelps, N. Y.: 

Association 178 

Philadelphia, Pa.: 

Associations (2) 186 

Dispensaries (10) 119 

Legislation 248 

Open Air Schools (2) 137 

Sanatoria (5) 60 

Philadelphia Jewish Sanatoriimi (Pa.) . . 59 

Philippine Islands: 

Association* 187 

Dispensary 124 

Legislation 249 

Penal Institution 87 

Sanatoria (3) 62 

Philipsburg, Pa. : 

Dispensary 120 

Phillipsburg, N. J.: 

Association 170 

Dispensary 105 

Phipps Dispensary (Md.) 99 

Phipps Institute (Pa.) 186 

Phipps Institute Dispensary (Peimsyl- 

vania) 120 

Phipps Institute Hospital (Pa.) 60 

Phoemx, Ariz.: 

Association 142 

Sanatoria (5) 12 



PhoenijTvrille, Pa.: 

Dispensary 120 

Picton County (N. S.) Association 290 

Pierce County (Washington) Associa- 
tion 193 

Pine Bluff, Ark.: 

Association 143 

Pine Camp (Va.) 67 

Pine City, Minn.: 

Sanatorium 37 

Pine Cottage (Mass.) 34 

Pinedale, Ga.: 

Sanatorium 22 

Pine Mountain Sanatorium (Ga.) 22 

Pines Sanatorium (N. C.) 54 

Pittsburg, Pa.: 

Associations (2) 186 

Dispensaries (2) 120 

Legislation 248 

Open Air Schools (2) 137 

Sanatoria (3) 61 

Pittsfield, Mass.: 

Association 158 

Dispensary loi 

Legislation 233 

Sanatorium 33 

Pittsford, Vt.: 

Sanatorium 66 

Pittston, Pa.: 

Dispensary 120 

Plainfield, N. J.: 

Association 1 70 

Dispensary 105 

Sanatorium 41 

Plattsburg, N. Y.: 

Association 179 

Pokegama Sanatorium (Minn.) 37 

Poland, N.Y.: 

Association 179 

Ponce, P. R.: 

Association 187 

Pontiac, 111.: 

Association 149 

Penal Institution 84 

Pontiac, Mich. : 

Insane Hospital 75 

Portage, Wis.: 

Association 195 

Portage County (Ohio) Hospital 55 

Portland, Me.: 

Dispensaries (2) 98 

Legislation 229 

Portland, Mich. : 

Association 163 

Portland, Ore.: 

Associations (2) 185 

Dispensary 112 

Legislation 246 

Sanatoria (2) 58 



322 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Porto Rico: 

Associations* (3) 187 

Dispensaries (7) 124 

Legislation 249 

Sanatorium 62 

Portsmouth, N. H.: 

Dispensary 104 

Portsmouth, R. I.: 

Association 189 

Pottenger Sanatorium (Cal.) 14 

Pottstown, Pa.: 

Dispensary 121 

Pottsville, Pa.: 

Association 186 

Dispensary 121 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. : 

Association 179 

Insane Hospital 77 

Sanatorium 50 

Power Cottage (Mass.) 34 

Preble County (Ohio) Hospital 56 

Prendergast Camp (Mass.) 31 

Presbyterian Hospital, Alaska. . . ._ 12 

Presbyterian Hospital Clinic (N. Y.) . . . 107 
Prescott, Ariz. : 

Association 142 

Sanatorium 12 

Pressmen's, Printing Sanatorium (Tenn.) 65 

Preventorium for Children (Conn.) 19 

Preventorium for Children (N. J.) 40 

Prince Albert, Sask. : 

Association 294 

Prince Edward Island: 

Associations (3) 292 

Dispensary 287 

Princeton, Wis.: 

Association 195 

Printers', Union, Home (Colo.) 17 

Printing Pressmen's Sanatorium (Tenn.) 65 

Prospect School (N. J.) 134 

Protestant Orphanage Open Air School 

(Pa.) 137 

Providence, R. I.: 

Associations (2) 189 

Dispensaries (2) 125 

Legislation 250 

Open Air School 138 

Sanatoria (3) 63 

Provident Hospital Dispensary (111.) ... 96 
Pueblo, Colo.: 

Dispensary 92 

Legislation 221 

Punxsutawney, Pa.: 

Dispensary 121 



Quarantine, Mo. 
Sanatorium . 



38 



PAGE 

Quebec: 

Associations (5) 293 

Dispensaries (2) 287 

Sanatoria (4) 286 

Quebec, Que.: 

Association 293 

Dispensary 287 

Queen Alexandra Sanatorium (Ont.) .... 285 

Queens Clinic (N. Y.) 108 

Queens County (Ont.) Association 293 

Quincy, 111.: 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Home 23 

Quincy, Mass.: 

Association 158 

Sanatorium 33 



Racine, Wis. : 

Association 195 

Legislation 256 

Rahway, N. J. : 

Penal Institution 86 

Rainbow Lake, N. Y.: 

Sanatorium 50 

Raleigh, N. C: 

Association 182 

Ralls County (Mo.) : 

Association 166 

Ranch Sanatorium (N. Mex.) 42 

Randolph, N. Y.: 

Association 179 

Rapides Branch (La.) Association 152 

Ray Brook, N. Y.: 

Sanatoria (2) 43, 5° 

Reading, Pa. : 

Association 186 

Dispensary 121 

Legislation 248 

Sanatoria (2) 61 

Reception Hospital (N. Y.) 52 

Redlands, Cal.: 

Association 144 

Sanatoriimi 15 

Red Cross Day Camp (N. Y.) 48 

Red River Valley Association (Minn.) .. 164 
Reed City, Mich.: 

Association 163 

Regina, Sask.: 

Association 295 

Registration Laws 257 

Reisterstown, Md. : 

Sanatorium 29 

Renfrew, Ont. : 

Association 292 

Renovo, Pa.: 

Dispensary 121 

Rensselaer County (N. Y.) : 

Hospital 50 



323 



INDEX 



PACE 

Rhinelander, \\'is.: 

Association iQS 

Rhode Island: 

Associations* (19) 188 

Dispensaries (5) 125 

Lejaslation . . .■ 249 

Open Air Schools (2) 138 

Sanatoria (6) 63 

Richland Center, Wis.: 

Association 19S 

Richmond, Ind.: 

Association 150 

Richmond, N. Y. : 

Dispensarj' 107 

Sanatorium 49 

Richmond, Va.: 

Associations (2) 192 

Dispensaries (2) 126 

Legislation 254 

Sanatorium 67 

Richmond County, Ga.: 

Association 147 

Sanatorium 22 

Ridge Camp (la.) 25 

Ridgway, Pa.: 

Dispensary' 121 

River Pines Cottage Sanatorium (Wis.) . 68 

Riverpoint, R. I. : 

Association 189 

Dispensarj' 125 

Riverside, Cal.: 

Sanatorium 15 

Riverside Cottage (B.C.) 284 

Riverside Sanatorium (N. Y.) 48 

Roanoke, Va.: 

Legislation 254 

Sanatorium 67 

Rochester, Minn.: 

Association 164 

Rochester, N. Y.: 

Association 179 

Dispensaries (2) 109 

Legislation 243 

Open Air School 136 

Sanatoria (3) 50 

Rochester, Pa.: 

Dispensarj' 121 

Rock Hill, S. C: 

Association 190 

Rock Island, 111.: 

Association 149 

Sanatorium . 23 

Rockland County (N. Y.) Association . . 178 

Rockville, Ind.: 

Sanatorium 24 

Rockville, Md.: 

Association 155 

Rockwood Tuberculosis Sanatorium 

(Ind.) 24 



PAGE 

Rocky Mountain Camp Sanatorium 

(Cal.) 16 

Rogersville, Tenn. : 

Sanatorium 65 

Rome, N. Y.: 

Association 1 79 

Dispensary 109 

Insane Hospital 77 

Sanatorium 51 

Rosedale, Kans. : 

Sanatorium 26 

Ross County (Ohio) Association 1S3 

Rowan County (N. C.) Association 182 

Roxbury, Mass. (See Boston) : 
Roxbury Homeopathic Dispensary 

(Mass.) 100 

Royal Edward Institute Dispensary 

(Que.) 2S7 

Royal League Sanatorium (N. C.) 54 

Rumenapp Cottage (N. Y.) 52 

Rush Hospital (Pa.) 61 

Rush Hospital Dispensary (Pa.) 120 

Rutland, Mass.: 

Sanatoria (8) 30, 33 



Sabillasville, Md. : 

Sanatorium 28 

Sacramento, Cal.: 

Association 144 

Legislation 220 

Saginaw, Mich.: 

Association 163 

Sanatorium 36 

Ste. Agathe Des Monts, Que. : 

Sanatoria (2) 286 

St. Anthony's Hospital (N. Y.) 49 

St. Anthony's Sanatorium (N. Mex.) ... 42 

St. Bartholomew's Clinic (N. Y.) 107 

St. Catharines, Ont.: 

Sanatorium 285 

St. Cloud, Minn.: 

Association 164 

Penal Institution 86 

St. Francis District (Que.) Association . . 293 

St. George's Class (N. Y.) loS 

St. George's Roof Camp (N. Y.) 48 

St. John, N. B.: 

Association 289 

Dispensary 286 

St. Johns, Mich.: 

Association 163 

St. John's Dispensary (Mo.) 104 

St. John's Infirmary Dispensary (Wis.) . . 127 
St. Joseph, La.: 

Association 153 

St. Joseph, Mo.: 

Association 166 



324 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Legislation 236 

Sanatorium 38 

St. Joseph's County (Ind.) Hospital .... 25 

St. Joseph's Hospital (Ariz.) 12 

St. Joseph's Hospital (N. Y.) 48 

St. Joseph's Hospital (R. I.) 63 

St. Joseph's Sanatorium (N. Mex.) 42 

St. Joseph's Sanatorium (N. Mex.) 43 

St. Joseph's Sanatorium (N. C.) 54 

St. Lawrence State Hospital (N. Y.) .... 77 
St. Louis, Mich.: 

Association 163 

St. Louis, Mo.: 

Associations (2) 166 

Dispensaries (12) 103 

Legislation 236 

Sanatoria (4) 38 

St. Louis County, Minn.: 

Dispensary 102 

Sanatorium 36 

St. Luke's Dispensary (Md.) 99 

St. Luke's Home (Ariz.) 12 

St. Luke's Hospital Clinic (N. Y.) 108 

St. Mary's Hospital (Ariz.) 13 

St. Mary's Hospital Clinic (Wis.) 127 

St. Mary's of the Lake (N. Y.) 52 

St. Michael's Hospital Dispensary (Ont.) 287 

St. Monica's Home, (Mass.) 31 

St. Paul, Minn.: 

Associations (2) 164 

Dispensary 103 

Legislation 235 

Open Air School 134 

Sanatoria (2) 37 

St. Peter, Minn.: 

Association 164 

Insane Hospital 76 

St. Peter's Hospital (N. Y.) 49 

St. Rochus Hospital (Ind.) 24 

St. Vincent's Hospital Clinic (N. Y.) 108 

St. Vincent's Sanatorium (N. Mex.) .... 43 
Salamanca, N. Y.: 

Association 179 

Salem, Mass. : 

Association 158 

Dispensary loi 

Legislation 233 

Sanatoria (2) 34 

Salem, Ore.: 

Sanatorium 58 

Salem Indian School (Ore.) 58 

Salisbury, N. C: 

Association 182 

Salt Lake City, Utah: 

Legislation 252 

Saluda, S. C: 

Association 190 

San Angelo, Tex. : 

Sanatoria (2) 65 



San Antonio, Tex. : 

Insane Hospital 79 

Legislation 252 

Sanatorium 66 

Sanatoria 11 

Sanatorium Laws 263 

Sanatorium Table 300 

San Diego, Cal.: 

Association 144 

Dispensary 92 

Legislation 220 

San Francisco, Cal.: 

Association 144 

Dispensary 92 

Legislation 220 

Sanatoria (2) 15 

San Joaquin County (Cal.) Camp 16 

San Jose, Cal. : 

Association 144 

Sanatorium '. 15 

San Juan, P. R.: 

Association 187 

Sanatorium 62 

San Juan Camp (P. I.) 62 

San Juan de Dios Hospital (P. I.) 62 

San Leandro, Cal.: 

Sanatorium 15 

San Quentin, Cal.: 

Penal Institution 83 

Santa Ana, Cal.: 

Association 144 

Santa Barbara, Cal.: 

Association 145 

Santa Clara, N. Y.: 

Sanatoria (2) 51 

Santa Clara County, Cal.: 

Association 144 

Sanatorium 15 

SantaFe, N. Mex.: 

Penal Institution 86 

Sanatoria (2) 43 

Saranac Lake, N. Y. : 

Association 179 

Sanatoria (9) 51 

Saratoga County (N. Y.) Hospital 52 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y.: 

Association 179 

Saskatchewan : 

Associations (21) 293 

Saskatoon, Sask.: 

Association 295 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.: 

Sanatorium 36 

Savannah, Ga.: 

Association 148 

Sayles-Memorial Dispensary (R. I.) . . . . 125 

Schenectady, N. Y.: 

Association 179 

Dispensary 109 



325 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Legislation 243 

Sanatorium 52 

Schenevus, N. Y.: 

Association 180 

Schoolcraft County j(Mich.) Associa- 
tion ■ 162 

School Instruction Laws 274 

Schools 129 

Schuylerville, N. Y.: 

Association 180 

Schuylkill County (Pa.) Association .... 186 

Scott County (la.) Hospital 25 

Scott County (Ky.) Association 151 

Scranton, Pa.: 

Association 186 

Dispensary 121 

Legislation 248 

Sanatorium 61 

Sea Breeze Hospital (N. Y.) 49 

Seaford, Del.: 

Dispensary 94 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Associations (2) 193 

Dispensary 126 

Legislation 254 

Sanatoria (3) 67 

Sea View Hospital (N. Y.) 49 

Secaucus, N. J.: 

Sanatorium 41 

Sedgwack Home (Kans.) 26 

Selingsgi-ove, Pa.: 

Dispensary 121 

Seton Hospital (N. Y.) 48 

Settlement, The (Cal.) 15 

Shamokin, Pa.: 

Dispensary 121 

Shannon's, Dr., Sanatorium (Conn.) .... 19 

Shapiro, Eva, Memorial Camp (Minn.) . 37 

Sharon, Mass.: 

Sanatorium 34 

Sharon, Pa.: 

Dispensary 122 

Shawnee, Okla.: 

Association 184 

Sheboygan, Wis. : 

Association 196 

Shelby, Mich.: 

Association 163 

Shelby County (Ohio) Hospital 57 

Shalt on, Conn.: 

Sanatorium 19 

Shenandoah, la.: 

Association 151 

Shenandoah, Pa.: 

Dispensary 122 

Sherbrooke, Que. : 

Association 293 

Shreveport, La.: 

Association 153 



Sierre Madre, Cal.: 

Association 145 

Sanatorium 15 

Siloam Springs, Ark.: 

Association 143 

Silver City, N. Max. : 

Association 171 

Sanatoria (2) 43 

Siou.-'w City, la.: 

Legislation 227 

Skillman, N. J.: _ 

Insane Hospital 76 

Smithfield, N. C: 

Association 182 

Smith's Falls, Ont.: 

Association 292 

Smithville, Tenn.: 

Association 191 

Smyrna, Del.: 

Dispensary 94 

Snokomish County League (Wash.) .... 193 

Snow Hill, Md.: 

Association 155 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Home (111.) 23 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Home (N. Y.) 44 

Soldiers' Home, Cal.: 

Sanatorium 15 

Soldiers' Home (Mass.) 32 

Somerset County (N. J.) Association ... 170 

Somerville, Mass.: 

Association 158 

Legislation 233 

Sanatorium 34 

SomerviUe, N. J.: 

Association 170 

Sonyea, N. Y.: 

Insane Hospital 78 

South Bend, Ind. : 

Association 150 

Legislation 226 

Sanatoria (2) 25 

South Bethlehem, Pa.: 

Dispensary 122 

South Carolina: 

Associations (9) 190 

Dispensary 125 

Legislation 250 

Penal Institution 87 

Sanatorium 63 

South Dakota: 

Legislation 251 

Sanatoria (2) 64 

Southern Pines Sanitarium (N. C.) 55 

Southfield Ferry Boat Day Camp (N. Y.) 47 

South Framingham, Mass.: 

Association 159 

Dispensary loi 

South Kingstown, R. I.: 

Association 189 



526 



INDEX 



PAGE 

South Manchester, Conn.: 

Association 146 

Open Air School 132 

South Norwalk, Conn.: 

Dispensary 93 

South St. Paul, Minn. : 

Association 165 

Southwestern Presbyterian Sanatorium 

(N. Mex.) 42 

Spartanburg, S. C: 

Association 190 

Spitting Laws 2 74 

Spokane, Wash.: 

Legislation 254 

Sprain Ridge Hospital (N. Y.) 53 

Springfield, 111. : 

Association 149 

Dispensary 96 

Legislation 225 

Springfield, Mass. : 

Association 159 

Legislation 233 

Sanatorium 34 

Springfield, Mo.: 

Association 166 

Springfield, Ohio: 

Legislation 246 

Sanatoria (2) 57 

Springside Sanatorium (Mass.) 33 

Stamford, Conn.: 

Association 146 

Sanatorium 20 

Stanford, Ky.: 

Association 152 

Stanton, Mich. : 

Association 163 

Stapleton, N. Y.: 

Dispensary 109 

Stark Count}' (Ohio) Hospital 55 

Starmont Sanatorium (Md.) 29 

Star Ranch, in the Pines (Colo.) 17 

State Farm, Mass.: 

Insane Hospital 75 

State Infirmary, (Mass.) 30 

Statesville, N. C: 

Association 182 

Staunton, Va.: 

Association 192 

Insane Hospital 80 

Stellarton, N. S.: 

Association 290 

Steuben County (New York) Hos- 
pital 52 

Steuben ville, Ohio: 

Association 184 

Stevens Point, Wis. : 

Sanatorium 68 

Stillwater, Minn.: 

Penal Institution 86 



PAGE 

Stockton, Cal.: 

Sanatorium 16 

Stony Wold Sanatorium (N. Y.) 46 

Stroudsburg, Pa.: 

Dispensary 122 

Sturgeon Bay, Wis. : 

Association 196 

Suffolk, Va.: 

Association 192 

Suffolk County (Mass.) House of Cor- 
rection 85 

Summers County (W. Va.) Association. . 193 

Summit, N. J.: 

Association 170 

Summit County (Ohio) Hospital 55 

Summit Street School (R. I.) 138 

Sumner County (Term.) Association .... 191 

Sumter, S. C: 

Association 190 

Sunbury, Pa.: 

Dispensary 122 

Sunlight Sanatorium (Colo.) 18 

Sunmount Sanatorium (N. Mex.) 43 

Sunnycrest Bungalows (Tex.) 65 

Sunnyrest Sanatorium (Pa.) 62 

Sunnyside (N. Y.) 46 

Superior, Wis. : 

Association 196 

Legislation 256 

Sanatorium 68 

Susquehanna, Pa.: 

Dispensary 122 

Susquehanna Day Camp Open Air 

School (N. Y.) 136 

Susquehanna Ferry Boat Day Camp 

(N.Y.) 49 

Swedish National Sanatorium (Colo.) . . 18 

Sydney, N. S.: 

Association 290 

Sydney Mines, N. S. : 

Association 290 

Syracuse : 

Association 180 

Dispensary 109 

Legislation 243 

Open Air School 136 

Sanatorium 52 

Tacoma, Wash. : 

Association 193 

Legislation 254 

Talbot County (Md.) Association 155 

Tallulah, La.: 

Association 153 

Talmage, Cal.: 

Insane Hospital 72 

Tamaqua, Pa.: 

Dispensary, 122 



327 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Tampa, Fla.: 

Legislation 223 

Tarboro, N. C: 

Association 182 

Tarentum, Pa.: 

Dispensaty. . .- 122 

Taunton, Mass.: 

Association 159 

Insane Hospital 75 

Legislation 233 

Telegraph Hill Neighborhood Associa- 
tion (Cal).: 14 

Tennessee: 

Associations (6) 190 

Dispensary 125 

Legislation 251 

Sanatoria (6) 64 

Tent Colony (Ohio) 56 

Terre Haute, Ind.: 

Association 150 

Legislation 226 

Tewksbury, INIass: 

Sanatorium 30 

Texas: 

Association* 191 

Dispensary 126 

Insane Hospitals (2) 79 

Legislation 251 

Penal Institution 87 

Sanatoria (7) 65 

Thalian Association (Ohio) 184 

Thalian Dispensary (Ohio) iii 

Thalian Fresh Air Camp (Ohio) 57 

Thomas Hospital (Minn.) 37 

Thrash's, Dr. E. C, Sanatorium (Ga.) . 22 

Three Rivers, Que.: 

Association 293 

Throat, Nose, and Lung Hospital (N.Y.), 

Camp and Dispensary 48,107 

Tioga, Pa.: 

Dispensary 122 

Tionesta, Pa.: 

Dispensary 122 

Titusville, Pa.: 

Dispensary 123 

Tiverton, R. I.: 

Association 1S9 

Tobin Cottage (N. Y.) 46 

Toledo, Ohio: 

Association 184 

Dispensary iii 

Legislation 246 

Sanatoria (3) 57 

Topeka, Kans.: 

Association 151 

Dispensary 97 

Insane Hospital 74 

Legislation 227 

Sanatorium 26 



PAGE 

Toronto, Ont.: 

Association 292 

Dispensaries (2) 287 

Sanatoria (3) 2S5 

Towanda, Pa.: 

Dispensary 1 23 

Towson, Md.: 

Sanatorium 29 

Tranquille, B. C: 

Sanatorium 2S4 

Traverse Cit}', Mich.: 

Insane Hospital 75 

Trenton, N. J.: 

Association 170 

Insane Hospital 76 

Legislation 240 

Tri-County League (N. S.) 289 

Troy, N. ¥.: 

Association 180 

Dispensaries (2) no 

Legislation 243 

Sanatorium 52 

Troy, Ohio: 

Sanatorium 57 

Tucson, Ariz.: 

Association 142 

Sanatoria (2) 12 

Tudor Cottage (N. C.) 54 

Tunkhannock, Pa.: 

Dispensary 1 23 

Tupper Lake Sanatorium (N. Y.) 53 

Tuscaloosa, Ala.: 

Insane Hospital 71 

Two Harbors, Minn.: 

Association 165 

Typical Laws 257 

Typical Organization Forms 197 

Tyrone, Pa.: 

Dispensary 123 

Ulster County, N. Y.: 

Association 176 

Sanatorium 46 

Undercliff Association (Conn.) 146 

Union County (N. J.) Hospital 41 

Union Printers' Home (Colo.) 17 

Uniontown, Pa.: 

Dispensary 1 23 

United States Army General Hospital 

(N. Mex.) 42 

United States Naval Hospital (Colo). ... 18 
United States Penitentiary Hospital 

(Ga.) 84 

United States Public Health and Marine 

Hospital Service Sanatorium (N. 

Mex.) 42 

University of Maryland Dispensary 

(Md.) 98 



328 



INDEX 



PAGE 

University of Minnesota Dispensary 

(Minn.) 102 

Uplands (N. Y.) 51 

Utah: 

Legislation 252 

Utica, N. Y.: 

Association 180 

Dispensary no 

Legislation 243 

Sanatorium 53 

Valatie, N. Y.: 

Association 180 

Valmora Industrial Sanatorium (N. 

Mex.) 43 

Vancouver, Wash.: 

Association 193 

Vanderbilt Clinic (N. Y.) 108 

Vanderbilt Clinic Open Air Class (N. Y.) 136 

Vanderburgh County (Ind.) Associa- 
tion 149 

Van Wert County (Ohio) Hospital 57 

Vermont: 

Insane Hospital 79 

Legislation 253 

Sanatoria (2) 66 

Verona, N. J. : 

Sanatorium 41 

Vineland, N. J.: 

Association 171 

Virginia: 

Associations* (11) 191 

Dispensaries (4) 126 

Insane Hospitals (4) 79 

Legislation 253 

Penal Institution 87 

Sanatoria (8) 66 

Wachusett Cottage (Mass.) 34 

Wake County (N. C.) Association 182 

Wales, Wis.: 

Sanatorium 68 

Walker, Minn. : 

Sanatorium 36 

Walla Walla, Wash.: 

Penal Institution 88 

Wallingford, Conn.: 

Sanatorium 20 

Wallum Lake, R. I.: 

Sanatorium 63 

Waltham, Mass.: 

Association 159 

Sanatorium 34 

Walton, N.Y.: 

Association 180 

Wapella, Sask.: 

Association 295 



Ware County (Ga.) Association 148 

Warren, Minn.: 

Association 165 

Warren, Pa.: 

Dispensary 1 23 

Insane Hospital 79 

Warren County (N. Y.) Hospital 53 

Warrensburg, N. Y. : 

Association 180 

Warren Summit, N. H.: 

Sanatorium 39 

Warrensville, Ohio: 

Sanatorium 58 

Warsaw, N. Y.: 

Association 180 

Washburn Dispensary (Mass.) 102 

Washington: 

Associations* (7) 192 

Dispensary 126 

Legislation 254 

Penal Institution 88 

Sanatoria (4) 67 

Washington, D. C: 

Association 147 

Dispensaries (7) 94 

Insane Hospital 72 

Legislation 222 

Open Air School 132 

Sanatoria (4) 21 

Washington, N. J.: 

Association 171 

Washington, Pa.: 

Dispensary 123 

Washington County (la.) Hospital .... 26 

Washington Grove, Md. : 

Sanatorium 29 

Washington University Dispensary 

(Mo.) 104 

Waterbury, Conn.: 

Association 146 

Dispensary 93 

Legislation 222 

Waterbury, Vt.: 

Insane Hospital 79 

Waterloo, N. Y. : 

Association 180 

Waterloo, Ont.: 

Association 292 

Watertown, 111. : 

Insane Hospital 73 

Watertown, N. Y. : 

Association 181 

Dispensary no 

Waterville, Me.: 

Association 154 

Dispensary 98 

Watervliet, N. Y.: 

Association 181 

Dispensary no 



329 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Watrous, N. Mex.: 

Sanatorium 43 

Waukegan, 111.: 

Association 149 

Sanatorium 24 

Waupun, Wis. : 

Penal Institution 88 

Wausau, Wis.: 

Association 196 

Dispensary 127 

Wautoma, Wis.: 

Association 196 

Wauwatosa, Wis. : 

Insane Hospital 80 

Waverly Hill Sanatorium, (Ky.) 27 

Waycross, Ga.: 

Association 148 

Wayne County (Ind.) Association 150 

Wayne County (Mich.) Hospital 35 

Waynesboro, Pa.: 

Dispensary 1 23 

Waynesburg, Pa.: 

Dispensary 1 23 

Wellesley Hills, Mass.: 

Sanatorium 35 

Wellsboro, Pa.: 

Dispensary 1 23 

Wernersville, Pa.: 

Insane Hospital 79 

Westborough, Ma,ss.: 

Insane Hospital 75 

West Chester, Pa. : 

Dispensary 1 23 

Westchester County (N. Y.) Hospital ... 45 
Westerly, R. I.: 

Association 189 

West Fairview, Pa.: 

Dispensary 124 

Westfield Day Camp Open Air School 

(N. Y.) 136 

Westfield Ferry Boat Day Camp (N. Y.) 47 
Westfield State Tuberculosis Hospital 

(Mass.) 30 

West Haverstraw, N. Y.: 

Sanatorium S3 

West Hoboken, N. J. : 

Legislation 240 

West Mountain Sanatorium (Pa.) 61 

Weston, W. Va.: 

Insane Hospital 80 

Westport, N. Y.: 

Association 181 

West Rutland, Mass.: 

Penal Institution 85 

West Virginia: 

Associations* (11) i93 

Dispensaries (2) 127 

Insane Hospital 80 

Legislation 254 

Sanatoria (3) 67 



Wethersfield, Conn.: 

Penal Institution 84 

Wej'burn, Sask.: 

Association 295 

Whatcom County, Wash.: 

Association 192 

Sanatorium 67 

Wheeling, W.Va.: 

Association 194 

Dispensary 127 

Legislation 255 

Sanatoria (2) 68 

White Bear Lake, JNIinn. : 

Sanatorium 37 

White Crusaders (Cal.) . . . .' 144 

White Crusaders' Sanatorium (Cal.) .... 13 

White Haven, Pa.: 

Sanatoria (4) 61 

White Plains, N.Y.: 

Association 181 

Whiteriver, Ariz.: 

Sanatorium 13 

Whitewood, Sask.: 

Association 295 

Whitney's Point, N. Y.: 

Association 181 

Wichita, Kans.: 

Legislation 227 

Sanatorium 26 

Wildwood Sanatorium (Corm.) 20 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa.: 

Association 187 

Dispensary 124 

Legislation 248 

Wilkinsburg, Pa. : 

Association 187 

Dispensary' 1 24 

Wilkinson House (N. Y.) 46 

Willard, N. Y.: 

Insane Hospital 78 

Williamsburg, Va.: 

Insane Hospital 80 

Williamsport, Pa.: 

Association 187 

Dispensary 1 24 

Legislation 248 

Willmar, Minn. : 

Association 165 

Wilmington, Del.: 

Associations (2) 146 

Dispensary 94 

Legislation 222 

Winchester, Mass.: 

Dispensary loi 

Winchester, Va. : 

Association 192 

Windsor, N. S.: 

Association 291 



330 



INDEX 



Winfield, 111.: 

Sanatorium 24 

Winnipeg, Man. : 

Association 288 

Sanatorium 284 

Winona, Minn. : 

Association 165 

Winston-Salem, N. C: 

Association 182 

Dispensary no 

Winyah Sanatorium (N. C.) 54 

Wisconsin : 

Associations* (23) 194 

Dispensaries (6) 127 

Insane Hospital 80 

Legislation 255 

Open Air School 138 

Penal Institutions (2) 88 

Sanatoria (6) 68 

Witherell, Nathaniel, Memorial Pa- 
vilion (Conn.) 19 

Wolseley, Sask. : 

Association 295 

Woodbury, N. J.: 

Association 171 

Woodhaven, N. Y.: 

Sanatorium 53 

Woodmen, Modern, of America, Sana- 
torium (Colo.) 16 

Woodstock, Ont. : 

Association 292 

Woonsocket, R. I. : 

Association 189 



PAGE 

Worcester, Mass.: 

Association 159 

Dispensaries (2) loi 

Insane Hospital 75 

Legislation 234 

Workmen's Circle's Sanatorium (N. Y.) . 46 

Wynne Farm (Tex.) 87 

Wyoming : 

Legislation 256 

Wyoming Valley (Pa.) Association 187 



Yakima, Wash. : 

Association 193 

Yavapai County (Ariz.) Association. . . . 142 

Yonkers, N. Y.: 

Association 181 

Dispensary no 

Legislation 243 

Sanatoria (2) 53 

York, Pa.: 

Dispensary 124 

Legislation 249 

Y. M. C. A. Health Farm (Colo.) 17 

Youngstown, Ohio: 

Association 184 

Dispensary 112 

Legislation 246 

Sanatorium 58 

Ypsilanti, Mich.: 

Association 163 



331 



Advertisements 



III 




New Mexico Cottage Sanatorium 

SILVER CITY, NEW MEXICO 
For the Treatment of Tuberculosis 



Physician - in - Ch ief 

E. S. BULLOCK, M.D. 



Manager 

WAYNE MACV. WILSON 



Beautiful situation in the mountains of southern New Mexico. 
Climatic conditions wonderfully perfect. Cool summers. Moderate 
winters. A flood of sunshine at all seasons. Food excellent and abun- 
dant. All the milk our patients can consume from our own dairy of 
selected cows. IModerate charge. Institution partly endowed. Sepa- 
rate cottages for patients. Complete hospital building for febrile cases. 
Separate amusement pavilions for men and women. Physicians in 
constant attendance. Livery for use of patients. Well equipped lab- 
oratory, treatment rooms, etc. All forms of tuberculosis received. 
Special attention to laryngeal tuberculosis. Tuberculin administered 
in suitable cases. One of the largest and best equipped institutions for 
tuberculosis in America. Patients received only through physicians. 

WRITE TO THE MANAGER FOR DESCRIPTIVE BOOKLET 



ly 



A doertisements 



St Joseph's Sanatorium 

Silver City, ]Sew jMcxico 

A thoroughK' equipped non-sectarian Sanatoiium for the Medical 
Treatment of Tuberculosis, conducted by the Sisters of Mercy. 

Situated in the outskirts of Silver City, altitude 6000 feet, with its 
extremely equitable climate; the winters being moderate and the summers 
relati\ely cool, making outdoor life pleasant throughout the entire year. 
Low humidity and maximum amount of sunshine. 

Buildings of modern construction, each room opening on two wide 
porches. Separate infirmary for febrile cases. Individual cottages for 
those preferring them. All moderate conveniences, including abundant 
baths, electric light, call bells, telephones, etc. Special attention to cuisine. 

To insure individual attention the number of patients is limited. 
Graduate nurses and physician in constant attendance. 

•por Hddtttonal Xnformation and prospectus, Hddress 

Oliver C Ryde, Medical Director 







RANCH SANATORIUM FOR TUBERCULOSIS DR. J. W. LAWS, Physician in Charge 

Temperature: Mean Maximum, 65 Degrees Mean Minimum, 38 Degrees Mean Annual, 52 Degrees 

Situated ten miles east of Fort Stanton Location of U. S. Sanatorium for Tuberculosis 

Altitude, 5,500 feet Annual Sunshine, 306 Days 

RATES: $12.50 TO $15.00 PER WEEK LINCOLN NEW MEXICO 




icxi I'.i; lui 



INTERIOR OF TEXT COTTAGE 



Advertisements 




The Pottenger Sanatorium 

FOR DISEASES OF THE LUNGS AND THROAT 

MONROVIA, CALIFORNIA 

A well equipped institution with high class accommodations for the scientific treatment of tubercu- 
losis. Situated in the foothill region of the Sierra Madre Mountains, the fame of which is world wide, 
for its climate, its natural beauty and its orange groves. 



For particulars address 

THE POTTENGER SANATORIUM, MONROVIA, CALIFORNIA 
Los ANGELES OFFICE, 1202-1203 UNION TRUST BLDG. 



Cragmor Sanatorium 




*^*qgSjj|ff8*:- ■ 



FOR THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS 

THREE MILES FROM COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO. ALTITUDE 6200 FEET 

Ideal Climate the year around. Beautiful view of Mountains and Prairie 
Individual Sleeping Porches. Best selected Food 

PHYSICIAN IN CHIEF, ALEXIUS M. FORSTER, M.D. 

CONSULTING PHYSICIANS 

GERALD B. WEBB, M.D. WM. WHITRIDGE WILLIAMS, M.D. 



SUPERINTENDENT 

MARY L. WHITNEY, R.N. 



DIRECTOR OF LABORATORY 

GEO. BURTON GILBERT, M.D. 



LITERATURE ON APPLICATION 



VI 



Advertisements 



THE WINYAH SANATORIUM 



ESTABLISHED 1888— ASHEVILLE, N. C. 








Dr. Silvio von Ruck. Medical Director 



Dr. Karl von Ruck, Consultant 



A modern and completely equipped Institution for the treatment ol 
tuberculosis. High-class accommodations. Strictly scientific methods. 
For particulars and rates write to WM. SCHOENHETT, Manager. 



Southern Pines Sanitarium 



for the Treatment 
of Tuberculosis 



ESTABLISNED 1898 

The long leaf pine region of North Carolina is now favorably known as an ideal climate 
or the treatment of tubercular cases. Three years ago the North Carolina legislature se- 
lected a site near this town for the State Sanitarium for Tuberculosis. The work done at the 
Southern Pines Sanitarium has been a factor in advertising the advantages of this climate 
in tubercular troubles. It is now the only private institution of its kind in this section of the 
State. Situated midway between the extreme North and South it is pecuHarly adapted to the 
outdoor treatment throughout the winter, and in summer the sleeping porches are securely 
screened. The humidity is low and the sunshine abundant throughout the year. Private 
dressing and sleeping rooms for each patient. The number of patients is limited and each 
has the physician's daily attention. 

RATES FROM 315.00 PER WEEK UP. NO EXTRAS 

ADDRESS EDWIN GLADMON, Phar.D., M.D., Medical Superintendent 

SOUTHERN PINES, N. C. 



A dvertisements 



Vll 



"RIVER 
PINES" 

STEVENS POINT 



WISCONSIN 



ESTABLISHED 
1906 



14 PERMANENT BLDOS. 
42 BEDS 



MEDICAL 

DR. THOS. H. HAY 

Resident Medical 

Director 



Graduate Nurses 
Rates Inclusive 




Outdoor Sleeping Room Indoor Dressing Room 



SURGICAL 

DR. F. E. WALBRIDOE 

Formerly of Milwaukee 

Resident Surgeon 

Surgical Building 

Completed March 

1st. 1911 



An attempt is being^ made in the surgical division to establish the indications for the sanatorium 
treatment of surgical luherculosis upon the same firm basis as the pulmonary form. 



BOOKLETS, CIRCULARS. REFERENCES, ETC. 
UPON REQUEST 



ADDRESS: DR. THOS. H. HAY 
RIVER PINES, STEVENS POINT, WISCONSIN 



SANATORIUM GABRIELS 
IN THE ADIRONDACKS 

TEN MILES FROM SARANAC LAKE 

For incipient and moderately 
advanced cases of Tuberculosis. 
Conducted by the Sisters of Mercy. 

H. J. BLANKEMEYER, M.D., Resident Physician 

Foi particulars apply lo Mothe^ Superior 
GABRIELS, FRANKLIN CO., N. Y. 



VIII A dvertisements 



Sunnyrest Sanatorium 

WHITE HAVEN, PENNA. 
For Diseases of the Lungs and Throat 

Situated in the Blue Mountains, 115 miles from Philadelphia and 147 miles 
from New York. 12 Vestibule Trains daily. 

Cottages and Individual Bungalows 

Visiting Physicians : 

DR. JOSEPH WALSH DR. CHARLES J. HATFIELD DR. H. R. M. LANDIS 

DR. FRANK A. CRAIG and DR! GEORGE FETTEROLF of Philadelphia. Pa. 

DRS. A. M. SHOEMAKER and W. F. WOOD of White Haven, Pa. 

Booklet ELWELL STOCKDALE, Supt. 

FERN CLIFF SANATORIUM 

white haven, pa. 

For the Treatment of Tuberculosis 



Overlooking the town of White Haven and the Lehigh Valley the Fern Clitf Sanatorium 
has the advantage of one of the best locations in the vicinitj\ 

The cottages of the institution are provided with every modern convenience, each patient 
having a private room with plenty of light and air. Spacious porches are provided and the 
patients are directed to be in the open air as much as possible, tents being pitched for those 
who wish to live continuously in the open during the warmer months. 

As the diet of the patient is one of the most important features of the treatment the 
selection and preparation of foods receives the closest consideration. 

The constant attention of a trained nurse is given every patient, and specialists on throat 
and lung diseases, who regularly visit White Haven from Philadelphia, are at their service. 

The records show that during the si.x years since the establishment of the sanatorium, 
rest in the pleasant home-like surroundings, the pure dry air, good water, nourishing food, 
and the climate of White Haven have given the most e.xcellent results where the disease was 
not too far advanced. 

The sanatorium accommodates from 20 to 25 patients, the rates ranging from $12 to 
$15 per week. .\ circular will be mailed upon request. 



A doertisements IX 



The Blue Ridge Mountain Sanatorium 

BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, PA. 



On the Scenic Western Maryland R. R. 



In the Blue Ridge Mountains of Southeastern Pennsylvania. 

Near and easily accessible to all the Eastern cities. 

A summer and winter resort region. Elevation 1650 feet. 

Climate equable and cool in summer, dry and bracing in winter. Pure spring water, 
supplied from large concrete reservoir. Bungalow; Shack; Cottage; Tent camp in summer. 
Electric signal bells from each to administration building. Pure air, no dust; isolated and 
yet easy of access to railroad, trolley, express office, telegraph office, drug store, and all the 
attributes of civilization. Large summer hotels nearby. A complete equipment for the 
scientific care and treatment of pulmonary and surgical tuberculosis. Excellent cuisine. 
Sample menus on request. 

Rates $12 to $25 per week, which includes medical attention. 

For information as to vacancies and admission apply to 

A. BARR SNIVELY, Medical Director 

BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, PA. 



FOR NEARLY TWO YEARS WE HAVE MADE A SPECIALTY 
OF DESIGNING AND SUPPLYING MATERIAL FOR 

TUBERCULOSIS EXHIBITS 

OF ALL KINDS AND SIZES 

From Lantern Slides to Large Travelling Exhibits 

OUR LATEST IS A COMPLETE 

EXHIBIT FOR $30.00 

"Special Bulletin Number One," describing this, free. 
Double Red Cross Shield Tags for Tag Days. 
Forty-page Illustrated Catalogue, " Public Health 
Exhibitions," sent for two-cent stamp. 

'Py.'SATnQNALp G. T. SWARTS, JR. 

ITBOINI ' ' V^ 70 Waterman St.. PROVIDENCE. R. I. 




X 



Adoertisements 



For both INDOOR and OUT-OF-DOOR use 

Kenwood Rugs and Sleeping Bags 
School Rugs and Hospital Rugs 




Offer the 
Greatest Possible 



Protection 

and Comfort 



Write to-day for 

Illtistrated Booklet 

and Samples 

Free 



In a Kenwood School Rug 
at one of the New York 
City Open Air Schools 



THE KENWOOD 
MILLS 

Albany, N. Y., U. S. A. 



Advertisements 



XI 




Dust Dangers 

Dust is always mischievous — 
Often dangerous; 
Doing nothing but harm 
Wherever it may fall. 

The contaminated air in hospi- 
tals, schools, theatres, churches, resi- 
dences and other buildings, always 
contains chemical and bacteriolog- 
ical impurities closely associated with 
the solid particles, or "dust." 

Dust is directly or indirectly the 
greatest enemy of man. Aside from 
the enormous cost involved in the 
continuous warfare against it for 
the sake of mere cleanness, dust is 
dangerous to breathe. 
Ordinary methods of ventilation do not remove these impurities to 
any considerable extent. 

Only by the appHcation of the Vacuum (or Suction) principle, con- 
centrated and controlled by means of specially devised tools for gathering 
dust, dirt, foul air and Hke impurities, can perfect, sanitary cleanness 
be effected. 

The McCrum-Howell Co., operating under the Kenney basic patent, 
the Matchette and Lotz patents (85 patents in all), manufactures the 
only complete line of Sanitary Vacuum Cleaning Systems in the world — 
plants suited to all requirements. 

Illustrated catalogues sent free on request. Correspondence is 
invited from Hospital and School Authorities particularly. 

The M9Crum- Howell COo 

41st St. and Park Ave., New York Rush and Michigan Sts., Chicago 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE FAMOUS 
"RICHMOND" line of Heating Boilers, Radiators, Enameled 
Ware, Concealed Transom Lifts and Vacuum Cleaning Systems 



THERE ARE TOOLS FOR ALL PURPOSES 

The Wide-Swath Bare-Floor Sweeper collects 

and carries away the dust in one operation 



Norwich, Conn.; 



FIVE FACTORIES 
Uniontown, Pa. (two plants) ; 



Racine, Wis.; Chicago, 111. 



N. B. — Correspondents mentioning the fact that they are answering our adver- 
tisement in this Directory will receive special attention. 



XII 



A dvertisements 



Use Preventive Methods 




Mortality reports from differ- 
ent sections of the United States 
show that 25 to 40 per cent, of 
all deaths are from consumption 
and pneumonia. 

It is a well-known fact that 
infection is accomplished chiefly 
b}' inhalation of germ-laden dust. 

The surest safeguard against 
infection is thorough Vacuum 
cleaning with the 




Vaci[\im Cleaner 



The Santo removes all the dust and dirt from the warp and woof as well as the surface 
of furnishings. 

The Santo pumping mechanism is not an adaptation of old ideas but is new and 
novel, specially designed and perfected to do thorough work in a portable vacuum 
cleaner. 

It is sufficiently powerful for use in home, store, 
church — anywhere. In operation it is perfectly 
noiseless, making it adaptable for use in hospitals 
and sanitariums. 

The Santo is used by the United States Gov- 
ernment, the Vatican at Rome, many Protestant 
churches of all denominations, and over 75,000 
homes and business concerns. 

It is furnished with tools for 20 different uses, 
and sold under a perpetual Guaranty Bond. 

Demonstrated and sold by our agents in nearly 
every large city. It will be shipped direct from 
factory upon receijit of price to any point where 
there is no Santo dealer. 

Copy of our interesting book "The Dustless 
Home" will be mailed free to any address upon 
request. 

Keller Mfg. Co., Dept. 2NA, Philadelphia 




Advertisements 



XIII 



Holtzer-Cabot 
Hospital Signaling System 

NOISELESS, EFFICIENT AND RELIABLE 



No 

Relays 

Required 

— this means 

SIMPLICITY 






$.,- 



«"«#••••••••• 



iteiiiafti'i.l r 111- 



No 

High 

Voltage 

-this means 

SAFETY 



Electric Lamp Type Annunciator 



We have given the subject of Hospital Signals most 
careful study, and are prepared to 
furnish a system which will best meet 
your local conditions. We are also 
prepared to furnish complete In- 
terior Telephone and Fire Alarm 
Systems for Hospitals, Schools, Col- 
Lamp signal station leges and other Institutions. 

Send for Specifications and Other Information 

THE HOLTZER-CABOT ELECTRIC CO. 

S'li™S CHICAGO, ILL. SF°FJii BROOKLINE, MASS. 




XIV 



Advertisements 



Sanitary Drinking fountains and Water Coolers 

Of dilTercnl kinds and styles adapted to all 
outdoor and indoor needs, furnished to those who 
use our RED CROSS INDIVIDUAL DRINKING 
CUPS. 

These are practical inventions, filling a long- 
felt want. They supply ice water free, and a new 
sanitary drinking cup to each person at the price of 
a penny or free, as desired. They can be connected 
with any water supply pipe or filled as needed. 

The water is purified by passing through a 
jjorcelain filter which is guaranteed to take out all 
impurities. 

If you have sufficient water supply, we will 
furnish free with cups our individual drinking cup 
vendors. 

The cups are a valuable and attractive adver- 
tising medium. We print your business and address 
on cup if desired. 

OUR LATEST IMPROVED PATENTED 
INDIVIDUAL DRINKING CUP 

Is made from pure wood fibre, waterproof, 
deodorized, and antiseptically treated — cut from one 
piece of paper and so folded that it requires no glue 
or other coating matter to make it water-tight. 

The cups are collapsible, and fold flat, but open 
easily without inserting finger. They can be 
carried in pocket without inconvenience, and used 
several times. For this purpose the cups are put up 
in transparent 
envelopes, five 
cups to the package, and dispensed by Sanitari- 
ums, Hospitals, Drug Stores, Schools, Hotels, etc. 




YOU NEED THESE CUPS. 

They protect you from communicable and 
infectious disease. Have them with you when 
you travel. Take them with 3'ou on your 
vacation. Packed in neat boxes 500 and 1000 
cups to the box. 

Special discount allowed on all cups for 
free distribution. Get our literature and prices. 

If YOU DON 'I BUY fROH US WE BOIH LOSE MONEY 

SANITARY DRINKING FOUNTAIN COMPANY 

W. T. BIRMINGHAM, General Manager 

WINCHESTER VIRGINIA 




A dvertisements 



XV 



The Keith Boston Bubbler 

Illustration sho\ving Bubbler \vith Self-Closing Valve 
adapted to the Recessed Type of Drinking Fountain 

Sanitary 

The convex surface 

I'-^r I ^.t""' being continuously washed 

by the flowing water while 
the fountain is in use. 



Non-Squirtable 

Preventing the fountain 
from being made a public 
nuisance by mischievous 
children. 

Automatic Pressure 

Regulator 

The Keith is the only 
sanitary drinking fountain 
having an Automatic Pres- 
sure Regulator. This in- 
sures a uniform height of 
stream at all times,— -a most 
important feature where 
there are a number of outlets 
on the same line. 




"The feature which attracted us and caused the adoption of the Keith Bubbler was the 
automatic regulation of the flow of water. On the ordinary fountains during recess time the 
flow was diminished to such an extent that the fountain became useless. The Keith Bubbler, 
with its automatic regulator, overcame this trouble and a constant flow of water at all periods 
of the day was obtained." 

Very respectfully yours, 

L. E. Thompson, 
for Board of Education, Lynn, Mass. 

Endorsed by the best-known health ofi&cers and school departments. 
Send name of a reliable local plumber and we will endeavor to co-operate 
so that you may test the Keith Bubbler with slight expense. 

Li. E. Knott Apparatus Company, Boston, Mass. 



XVI 



Advertisements 



PAPER JlycJiENio GOODS 



FOR PROMOTING SANITARY CONDITIONS 




SPL"TL"M CUP FILLERS 
Wire Stitched. Pkgs. 20 



SPUTUiM CUP KILLERS SPUTl'M CUP HOLDERS 

Flat. Pkgs. luo In Laquore, Nickel and Alumimim 




PAPER TOWELS 



WOOD SPECI.MEN r.O.\ES PAl'llR DRIXKINC, CUPS 



Paper Table Cloths 
Paper Napkins 
Toilet Paper 



Crematory Baskets and Fillers 
Waterproof Paper Bags 
Wrapping Paper and Twine 



Dustless Dust Cloths 
Dustless Floor Mops 
Dustless Floor Brushes 



Tuberculosis Exhibit Supplies 

Manufacturers, Importers and Dealers 

STONE & FORSYTH BOSTON, MASS. 

FACTORY AT STONEHAM. MASS. 



Advertisements 



XVII 



Headquarters for Sanatorium Supplies 

Articles for Treatment of and Preventing Spread of Tuberculosis 

SPUTUM FLASKS AND PAPER SPIT CUPS, FUMIGATING AND DISINFECTING APPARATUS 
SICK-ROOM UTENSILS AND INVALID SUPPLIES 

Our Surgic^il IiistrunifiUs, llospilal I^mnilurc, Sleiilizcis, Klf iro-Mr<lic al Apparatus, etc., are 
recog^uized everywhere as Staiiilard of High (juality. 

Write for Catalogue of tliose articles you are panicularly interesud in. 



iTfiSCTOHOSFITflLrURNITURtl 
PbSURGICaL STERILIZERS^ 




THERE.ISfl&REflT5flTI5FflCTI0N 

IN ORI&INPiTlNQ AND IN 
nniNTfllNING fl HIGH STflNDflRD 
THtRE. 15 NO 'economy IN 
BUYING flNYTHING BUT THE BL5T 

THEKNY-5CHEtRLRC0. 

DEPflRTriENTOFHOoPITflLSUPPLILS 

NE.W YORK 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CFTrnLOGUE.. j 



THE 




fr 



KNY-SCHEmCO. 

404-410 West 27th St. 
.Y. 



D-S.flD0LPHU5 KNOPFS 
ORIGINRL WINDOW TLNT 



1 




THL MOST PERFECT flERfiRIUM 

FOR HOnL TREATMENT 

OFPULNGNflRY TU5ERCUL05I5 

CONSTRUCTED ON STRICTLY 

SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLLS 

PRICE. %\0. 

^THLKNY-5CHLLRLRC0^ 

NEW YORK 

. SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE PflMPfiLLTj 



THE ALLEN HEALTH TENT 

Solves the Problem of Bedroom Ventilation 

Why sleep outdoors or have a cold disagreeable 
sleeping room from open windows? The Allen Health 
Tent receives ventilation from both top and bottom of 
the window and permits a warm sleeping room. Venti- 
lation is regulated by raising or lowering the window 

sash. It gives one the pro- 
tection for which houso 
were built and exclude > 
from the sleeper the impure 
house air. 

With top and bottom 
ventilation, ample protection to the body in all sorts 
of weather, its conveniences and comforts in use, it 
is an important and inexpensive helper in the treat- 
ment of Tuberculosis. 




-^E'^D i^pENING 




Write for free Descriptive Booklet, Prices, etc. 

Indoor Window Tent Co., 1307 s. Adams St., Pcoria, in. 



XVIII 



Advertisements 




Guaranteed 
Waterproof 



SANITARY SHEETING 

TS a pure white, soft and imper\"ious sheeting for bed sheets, hospital 
use and the nursery. Made from a formula of our own that con- 
tains no rubber, is odorless, hygienic, acid proof and easily cleaned. 
We also make surgeons' and nurses' aprons of the same material. 

THE OMO MANUFACTURING CO. 

MIDDLETO WN CONNECTICUT 



THE ALLENDALE 

COUNTERPANES 

In use for more than a half century 

IF you want a clean, sanitary bed-spread ; one that can be washed and ironed as 
easily as the ordinary sheet, beautiful in appearance, advised as a sanitary expe- 
dient by physicians and recommended by all who have used them, buy these widely 
used staple Quilts. 

They are carefully woven in a tasteful pattern and will give remarkable wear 
and service. They are popular in homes, h'>spitals, and institutions generally. 

A superintendent of a large institution, who has used them regularly 
for over twenty vears — and several thousands of them during that time — writes : 
' ' The fact that I have used these Quilts for so viany years, and that 
1 have used them in preference to Quilts of other makes ivhich I have 
occasionally purchased, is the best evidence of what I think of thetn. 
Often I have taken occasion to refer to these goods, to their Beauty 
and Durability.'''' 
A superintendent of a hospital writes, in giving her second order : " The 
Quilts are more than satisfactory." 

Among what others write about these Counterpanes are the following, viz.: 
Q " Have used these Counterpanes and find them extremely satisfactory." 

fl " They have worn so satisfactorily and are so easily laundered that I want more 

of them." 

(| " My daughter has used your Quilts and is enthusiastic over them. I wish to 

try them.' Write now for description, Dept. D. 

THE DIMITY QUILT COMPANY, Providence, R. I., U. S. A. 



A dvertisements 



XIX 






^ -.SuHsUnic "" 


Tfrrn-ym 


TiTr7rrn-rrT^'~- r 


■ , 






A. ■'H.S^. CV__sg.4: 


___®_g. 


.-..S'S' ,■-. 


•'■ ^ -- -' 


■^■^smmmm^ 



The Best Clinical Thermometer ever produced for Tuberculosis Work. 

It is vastly superior to the "non-magnifying" style of thermometer, as it presents a 
wider and clearer mercury column than the latter — yet is as easy to find, and any one can 
read it instantly. 

Harvard "Sunshine" scales start at 94 or 96 degrees and do not run above 108 degrees. 
The results are long and open divisions on the scale; and a mercury column easily shaken 
down, without in any way impairing the reliability or dependability of the Thermometer. 

Prices of Harvard "Sunshine" Pyretometers to the Physician: 

No. 72 — 2 minute each $0.75 

No. 74 — ij^ minute " i.oo 

No. 75 — I minute " 1.25 

Usually suppHed in Acme (patented) easily sterilized Hard Rubber or Metal Chain Cases 
Special Discounts to Institutions Ordering in Quantities 



THE TUBERCULIN SUB-Q 




The Approved Instrument for Administering Tuberculins 

(Sold only for Professional Use) 

Tube is of glass with heavy walls and small bore. Black metal piston, gold-plated tip, 
fitted with McElroy's Improved Mineral Packing, which is smooth, firm and elastic, and 
which may be sterilized in alcohol flame, bichloride solution, or boiling water without injur\^ 

For Opsonic Work, it is superior to any other style because minute quantities can be 
given with accuracy, as the exact capacity of each instrument is verified and the graduations 
of the scale show divisions of one hundredth of a Cc. 

Syringes are supplied with screw threads only; ground shp points will be made to order. 

No. 2020, }/2 Cc. in leatherette case, complete with two /C--T^j Polished Razor- 

Edge Needles Si .50 

No. 2021, I Cc. in leatherette case, complete with two /C^ffO Pohshed Razor- 

Edge Needles i .50 

Either size, complete, in fine morocco case 2.50 

THE RANDALL-FAICHISEY COMPANY 

INSTRUMENT MAKERS BOSTON, U. S. A. 



XX A doerlisements 



THE TREATMENT AND 
PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 

is explained nowhere else so clearly and so fully as in the 

Journal of the Outdoor Life 

THE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS MAGAZINE 



Its contributors are leaders in the anti-tuberculosis cam- 
paign. They are the ph}'sicians who stand at the head of the 
profession and have achieved the most substantial successes 
in the treatment of tuberculosis, the social workers who have 
prosecuted the most successful campaigns, and the patients 
who have taken the cure and know and can tell how they won. 
The articles in the Journal of the Outdoor Life are analytical 
and constructive. They tell HOW, in detail, and WHY; the 
reason is no less important than the direction. 

The magazine, however, does not and cannot supplant 
personal medical advice. As stated in each issue, " any one 
suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis, who is not under the 
care and guidance of a physician, is taking grave chances." 

The Journal of the Outdoor Life, on the contrary, is 
designed as an aid to both physician and patient in rigorously 
carrying out the cure. It should be on every physician's table 
and in the hands of every patient, nurse and social worker. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, $1.00 PER YEAR 

Canadian Postage wu rriW in ripiVTC Foreign Postage 

25 Cents Extra '^^^ CUFY, lU Uh.JM ^ 50 Cents Extra 

Six Selected Back Numbers, Containing Helpful Articles, 50 Cts. Prepaid 



Journal of the Outdoor Life 

105 EAST 22D STREET NEW YORK CITY 



Advertisements XXI 



Tuberculosis "Don't Cards" 



AND 



Literature of All Kinds 



^ Our "Don't Cards," four pages, folded, size 
4/^x6^ incfies, two colors (approved by tfie 
National Association for the Study and Prevention of 
Tuberculosis), are printed and kept in stock in sixteen 
different languages. English at $ 1 .60 per 1 000 ; 
foreign at $1.88 per 1000; first and fourth pages 
blank. Imprinted if desired. Samples upon request. 

We have exceptional facilities for printing Annual Reports, 
Books, Pamphlets, Circulars, and Office Stationery. 

ESTIMATES PROMPTLY FURNISHED. 

FRANK F. LISIECKI 

9-15 Murray Street - - - New York City 

TRANSACTIONS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS 

Reduced from $10.00 to $3.00 

There are a few volumes of the Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress on 
Tuberculosis, held in Washington, in 1908, left over after their distribution to members 
and general sale. 

The set consists of six volumes of eight books, about 5C00 pages of printed matter, 
bound in heavy paper. They cover authoritatively such aspects of tuberculosis as its 
Pathology, Bacteriology, Clinical Study, Therapy and Surgery, the Cause and Prevention 
of the Disease, its Hygienic, Social, Industrial and Economic Aspects, State and Muni- 
cipal Control and Animal Tuberculosis in its Relation to Man. The papers are by the 
best known men in their various fields from all parts of the world. 

This is the latest work of its kind on one of the most important economic subjects 
now being discussed by the public, the medical profession and social workers. It con- 
stitutes in itself a most comprehensive and valuable library on tuberculosis, and one 
which will probably never be duplicated. Accordingly it has permanent value and 
should be at the hand of every tuberculosis worker, whether professional or lay. 

There are only a few sets of these books left. Originally sold to non-members for 
^10.00 a set, they will now be offered as long as they last for ^3.00 a set, express charges 
to be paid by the purchaser. 

Orders should be sent to the 

National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis 

105 EAST 22nd STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



DATE DUE 


■ 








iin\^i9?non 


DECn42 


300 


























































































































DEMCO 38-296 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



0041065760 





m^ :